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Eili Y. Klein, Ph.D., M.A.

Headshot of Eili Y. Klein
  • Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

Research Interests

Antimicrobial resistance; Influenza evolution; Pathogen competition across space and scale; Impact of antimicrobial drug resistance on ecology and epidemiology of disease; Economic epidemiology; Mathematical and theoretical ecology; Evolution of pathogen-host interactions. ...read more

Background

Dr. Klein is an associate professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine. He is also a senior fellow at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy in Washington, D.C. Upon finishing his Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from Princeton University, Dr. Klein joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2012.

Dr. Klein’s research focuses on the role of individuals in the spread of infectious diseases. This area of research sits at the nexus of economics and epidemiology, and is premised on the idea of incorporating incentives for healthy behavior and attendant behavioral responses into an epidemiological context to better understand how diseases are transmitted. This nascent field of economic epidemiology is based on the idea of improving policy responses to epidemic diseases by giving policymakers and health care providers clear tools for thinking about how certain actions can influence the spread of disease transmission. The primary disease focus of Dr. Klein’s research is antimicrobial resistance and the spread of disease within the hospital.

Dr. Klein has authored numerous publications on the evolution and spread of antimicrobial drug resistance and efforts to stop transmission in the hospital. Dr. Klein is actively involved in research efforts supported by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) as well as Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to improve infection control as well as medical decision-making to reduce the impact of antibiotic resistance.

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Titles

  • Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

Departments / Divisions

Education

Degrees

  • B.A.; Columbia University in the City of New York (New York) (1998)
  • M.A.; Johns Hopkins University (Maryland) (2005)
  • Ph.D.; Princeton University (New Jersey) (2012)

Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Klein is actively involved in research efforts examining the ecology and epidemiology of antibiotic resistance in the United States, focusing on aspects of the emergence, spread, and economic impact of important pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and Clostridium difficile. In addition, he is also actively engaged in understanding the impact of seasonal changes in antibiotic prescriptions on changes in resistance levels, and how the interaction between the hospital and the community influences different strains of resistance. Dr. Klein also has active research programs dealing with the spread of resistant pathogens in the hospital and improving medical decision-making.

Selected Publications

View all on PubMed

Klein EY, Tseng KK, Hinson J, Goodman KE, Smith A, Toerper M, Amoah J, Tamma PD, Levin SR, Milstone AM. The Role of Healthcare Worker-Mediated Contact Networks in the Transmission of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci. Open Forum Infectious Diseases. 2021; 21(5):E111. DOI: 10.1093/ofid/ofaa056

Klein EY, Martinez EM, May L, Saheed M, Reyna V, Broniatowski DA. Categorical Risk Perception Drives Variability in Antibiotic Prescribing in the Emergency Department: A mixed methods observational study. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2017; 32(10): 1083-1089.

Klein E, Milkowska-Shibata M, Tseng KK, Sharland M, Gandra S, Pulcini C, Laxminarayan R. Assessment of WHO antibiotic consumption and access targets, 2000-2015: an analysis of pharmaceutical sales data from 76 countries. Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2021; 21(1): 107-115. DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(20)30332-7

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