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Nerve Injuries and Conditions

Whether due to injury or birth defect, nerve injuries cause debilitating physical and psychological effects that can keep adults and children from making the most of their lives, working, playing, going to school, and enjoying time with family and friends.

The reconstructive surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine, pride themselves on restoring their patients sense of wholeness, opening up possibilities that may never have existed. 

Conditions We Treat

  • Brachial Plexus Injuries

    The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that sends signals from the spinal cord to the shoulder, arm and hand. When those nerves are damaged, it is considered a brachial plexus injury.

  • Other Peripheral Nerve Conditions

    When there is something wrong with peripheral nerves in some part of the body, it interrupts the signals between the brain and spinal cord and that part of the body.

 
 

Why Choose Johns Hopkins

  • Our reconstructive surgeons bring experience and expertise in peripheral nerve disorders, as well as knowledge of the most effective and innovative surgical techniques.
  • Our experts in peripheral nerve disorders are devoted to providing quality and attentive patient care, helping address both physical and emotional patient and family needs.
  • From the first consultation to the final check-up, our reconstructive surgeons are available and accessible to answer questions and help you make informed care decisions.

Our Approach to Brachial Plexus Injuries

Johns Hopkins reconstructive surgeons have expertise in treating even the most complex brachial plexus injuries. The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that sends signals from the spinal cord to the shoulder, arm and hand. When those nerves are damaged, it is considered a brachial plexus injury, and it can cause pain or numbness, an inability to move your arm or hand, or a feeling of limpness. Injury can occur during birth, especially if it’s a difficult birth, from tumors putting pressure on nerves, trauma (such as an accident) or inflammation. At Johns Hopkins, we offer well-rounded multispecialty care to help you regain as much function as possible after a brachial plexus injury.

Learn more about brachial plexus injuries.

How We Treat Peripheral Nerve Injuries

Peripheral nerves are those located outside of your brain and spinal cord. When these nerves are injured, the injury can interrupt the signals between the brain, spinal cord and the part of the body supported by the injured nerves.

Treatment of peripheral nerve injuries requires a comprehensive approach that often involves specialists in several fields, including reconstructive surgery, neurosurgery and orthopaedics. The decision to repair peripheral nerve damage through surgery can be complex. It factors in the type of problem, severity of the pain and other symptoms, and how well other treatments have worked. Our team of expert will evaluate your injury and recommend treatment approaches that align with your health goals and lifestyle and offer the best outcomes.

Learn more about peripheral nerve injuries. 

Facebook Live: Latest Treatment Options for Peripheral Nerve and Spinal Cord Injuries

Plastic and reconstructive surgeon Sami Tuffaha discusses the latest treatments for brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries, and how these surgical approaches are now being used to improve upper extremity function in patients with spinal cord injury.

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