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Hopkins Reader

Beyond Consent: Seeking Justice in Research

In 350 B.C., Aristotle provided two definitions of justice in his Nicomachean Ethics: “the whole virtue” and “fairness in distribution.”

Fulfilling Aristotle’s definition is vastly complicated, as Jeffrey Kahn, director of Johns Hopkins’ Berman Institute of Bioethics; Anna Mastroianni, a law professor at the University of Washington; and Jeremy Sugarman, also a professor in the Berman Institute, point out in their compilation of scholarly yet plainly written essays on the essential quest to establish and implement ethical guidelines for medical research.

The collection of essays by 18 contributors that form the 12 chapters of Beyond Consent: Seeking Justice in Research—including two by the editors themselves and one by Neal W. Dickert ’06, now an assistant professor of medicine at Emory—provides a comprehensive overview of this continually evolving field. The editors first put together such a collection in the late 1990s. They found that not only do many of the issues they previously addressed still prevail, but newer controversies have arisen, making this second edition as relevant as the first 20 years ago.

This book addresses such key questions as what does fairness demand in terms of selecting the type of research and its participant population, and how ought fairness be interpreted in the distribution of benefits to participants and in considering the relevance of the research to society?

Many consider advances in medical ethics over the past 20 years to be dramatic and reassuring, yet researchers and practitioners still grapple with extremely complicated ethical issues that the essays in this book clarify, illuminate and thoroughly explore.

Beyond Consent: Seeking Justice in Research Book Cover

Beyond Consent: Seeking Justice in Research
Jeffrey P. Kahn, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Anna C. Mastroianni, J.D., M.P.H.
Jeremy Sugarman, M.D., M.P.H., M.A.
Oxford