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Class Notes

Standout in the NFL

Ever since she was a child, Leigh Ann Curl ’89 has stood out in a crowd. She has described herself as “the tomboy of the neighborhood … the little girl who had the baseball glove on, the softball in her hand, and hats.”

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Standout in the NFL

One Busy Man

Believing the adage that if you want something done, give it to a busy person, the school of medicine’s alumni association recently prevailed upon Chester Schmidt ’60 to take over the presidency of his class when his longtime predecessor, George Callard, relinquished it.

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One Busy Man

The Commish

It was the third month of his pediatric internship, and 22-year-old Howard Zucker (house staff, 1982–1985) found himself admitting six new patients one night on top of the nine he already had. Inundated, he approached his chief resident to say he couldn’t manage the new admissions along with everything else already on his plate. “The chief resident said: ‘This is Hopkins. We live up to the responsibilities given to us. Oh, and don’t forget to fill out the charts before you leave,’” Zucker recalls.

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The Commish

In Memoriam

Richard Starr Ross, 1924–2015

Not too many people would mention that they were born and raised in an insane asylum, but for Richard Starr Ross, dean of the school of medicine from 1975 to 1990, the fact that his physician father had been superintendent of the Eastern Indiana Hospital for the Insane, on whose property the family lived, appealed to his droll sense of humor.
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In Vitro Pioneer

Gynecological surgeon Howard W. Jones Jr. ’35 oversaw the 1965 Johns Hopkins research that resulted in the world’s first successful fertilization of a human egg outside the body, then later collaborated with his wife, gynecological endocrinologist Georgeanna Seegar Jones ’36 (1912–2005), to head efforts leading to the United States’ first “test tube” baby in 1981.
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A Father of CPR

In 1957, with a flash of inspiration that foresaw the lifesaving potential of forcefully applying one hand pressed palm down on another in the middle of a heart patient’s chest, cardiac surgeon James Jude became one of three men credited with making The Johns Hopkins Hospital the birthplace of CPR. Tens of thousands of people today who suffer a cardiac arrest beyond the reach of an electronic defibrillator owe their lives to him.
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Tenacious Patient Advocate

Long before “patient safety” became a mantra within all Johns Hopkins Medicine hospitals—and medical centers nationwide—it was a lodestar for Patricia Charache, a world-renowned infectious diseases specialist, pathologist, oncologist and medical microbiologist during her half-century career at Johns Hopkins.
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Inspiring Surgeon—and Patient

In 1995, when she was 34, breast cancer surgeon Carolyn Kaelin ’87 was named founding director of the Comprehensive Breast Health Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, making her the youngest woman ever chosen for such a high-ranking post there. She quickly became a patient favorite.
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