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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: January 18, 2018

Provides unique new framework for early detection of the most common cancers


Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.

Released: January 18, 2018


Data collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Tufts University School of Medicine and Cancer Center.
Released: January 16, 2018


Experiments with a small group of overweight men and women have added to evidence that “hunger hormone” levels rise and “satiety (or fullness) hormone” levels decrease in the evening. The findings also suggest that stress may increase hunger hormone levels more in the evening, and the impact of hormones on appetite may be greater for people prone to binge eating.

Released: January 16, 2018


A new study that seeks to ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches and, ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.

Released: January 11, 2018


Johns Hopkins hopes to become the first hospital in the U.S. to perform HIV-positive to HIV-positive organ transplants from living donors.

Released: January 10, 2018


What is precision medicine? It’s the practice of tailoring specific treatments to individual patients. Sometimes this involves making connections between a patient’s distinct genetic code and treatments that target that code, but it also takes into account a patient’s environment and lifestyle. Rather than the typical approach of prescribing treatments based on averages among patient populations, precision medicine has been the rallying cry of health care experts longing for better ways to match patients with customized care.
Released: January 8, 2018

Leading Causes of Death Are Prematurity and Injuries


In a new study of childhood mortality rates between 1961 and 2010 in the United States and 19 economically similar countries, researchers report that while there’s been overall improvement among all the countries, the U.S. has been slowest to improve.

Released: January 8, 2018


Johns Hopkins scientists have used a form of artificial intelligence to create a map that compares types of cellular receptors, the chemical “antennas” on the surface of immune system T-cells. Their experiments with lab-grown mouse and human T-cells suggest that people with cancer who have a greater variety of such receptors may respond better to immunotherapy drugs and vaccines.

Released: January 4, 2018

Project funded by collaboration between The Johns Hopkins University and Deerfield Management aims to develop first-in-class small molecule drug


Bluefield Innovations, a collaboration between The Johns Hopkins University and Deerfield Management to catalyze early stage therapeutic development, announced today the acceptance and funding of its first project. The target, the enzyme RNA polymerase I (Pol I), is implicated in many forms of cancer.
Released: January 3, 2018

Epilepsy drug reverses anti-social behaviors in mice with genes that produce variant proteins


Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have identified rare genetic variations in a protein called Thorase, which is responsible for breaking down receptors at the connections between neurons in the brain.
Released: January 3, 2018


Johns Hopkins Medicine International (JHI) and the National Healthcare Group (NHG) today announced that their 20-year partnership has progressed to a new phase, with their Johns Hopkins Singapore International Medical Centre (JHSIMC) joint venture evolving into the new NHG-Johns Hopkins Singapore Institute.
Released: January 2, 2018

Studies suggest potential for reversing progressive vision loss


Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a cell signaling pathway in mice that triggers vision loss in patients with diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion – diseases characterized by the closure of blood vessels in the retina, leading to blindness. In experiments that suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the eye, researchers were able to re-establish normal blood flow in the retina, offering a potential means of stalling or even reversing diabetes-related blindness.

Released: January 2, 2018

Assessment shown to be more accurate than a standard test for nonfasters


In a direct comparison study, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that a newer method of calculating so-called “bad cholesterol” levels in the blood is more accurate than the older method in people who did not fast before blood was drawn.
Released: December 28, 2017


In a study of medical records gathered on hundreds of thousands of African-American women, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have evidence that women with a common form of hair loss have an increased chance of developing uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids.
Released: December 20, 2017

Higher “mutational burden” predicts which cancer types will respond to therapies known as checkpoint inhibitors


The “mutational burden,” or the number of mutations present in a tumor’s DNA, is a good predictor of whether that cancer type will respond to a class of cancer immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors, a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers shows. The finding, published in the Dec. 21 New England Journal of Medicine, could be used to guide future clinical trials for these drugs.

Released: December 18, 2017


In a study using genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have uncovered some new molecular details that appear to explain how electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) rapidly relieves severe depression in mammals, presumably including people. The molecular changes allow more communication between neurons in a specific part of the brain also known to respond to antidepressant drugs.
Released: December 15, 2017


Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter — a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber — are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.

Released: December 14, 2017


Scientists at Johns Hopkins have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical’s pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications.

Released: December 14, 2017


Two Johns Hopkins prostate cancer researchers found significant disparities when they submitted identical patient samples to two different commercial liquid biopsy providers. Liquid biopsy is a new and noninvasive alternative to tumor tissue sequencing, and it is intended to specifically detect and sequence tumor DNA circulating in patients’ blood. The results are used to help guide doctors to tailor the best treatment for patients at each point of their disease.

Released: December 12, 2017


An analysis of 16 audiotaped conversations between parents of infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and clinicians found that medical staff routinely downplay quality of life issues and leave families more optimistic about their babies’ prognoses than the clinicians intended.