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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: February 20, 2018


In an analysis of clinical data collected on more than 9,000 people, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that the number of years spent overweight or obese appear to “add up” to a distinct risk factor that makes those with a longer history of heaviness more likely to test positive for a chemical marker of so-called “silent” heart damage than those with a shorter history
Released: February 20, 2018

Researchers call for “standard pricing” legislation to reduce financial burdens of vulnerable patients


An analysis of recent Medicare billing records for more than 3,000 hospitals across the United States shows that charges for outpatient oncology services such as chemo infusion or radiation treatment vary widely and exceed what Medicare will pay by twofold to sixfold.

Released: February 13, 2018


As the Winter Olympics begin, the world will be marveling at feats performed by athletes at the top of their game. But how do judges distinguish, in just a split second, a gold medal-winning performance from a silver?
Released: February 12, 2018


In an editorial that draws on results of previously published studies and experiences in their medical intensive care unit (ICU), a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine professionals say that bringing specially trained dogs into ICUs can safely and substantially ease patients’ physical and emotional suffering.

Released: February 12, 2018


Below are brief summaries of story ideas for February’s Valentine’s Day and American Heart Month
Released: February 12, 2018


Johns Hopkins researchers report successful use of heart imaging to predict the benefit or futility of catheter ablation, an increasingly popular way to treat atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder.

Released: February 9, 2018


The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Brancati Center will provide free community health screenings this Saturday, Feb. 10, at A Family Affair, an event hosted by Living Classrooms. RSVP encouraged: email tiztraining@livingclassrooms.org or call (443) 835-1463 x667 to register.

Released: February 8, 2018


Johns Hopkins researchers report they have developed two new endoscopic probes that significantly sharpen the technology’s imaging resolution and permit direct observation of fine tissue structures and cell activity in small organs in sheep, rats and mice
Released: February 7, 2018

Findings suggest opportunity to increase organ supply, save lives


In a new Johns Hopkins study of patient and graft survival trends for pediatric liver transplant recipients between 2002 and 2015, researchers found that outcomes for alternatives to whole liver transplantation (WLT), such as splitting a liver for two recipients or using a part of a liver from a living donor, have improved significantly.
Released: February 6, 2018


A new Johns Hopkins study of mice with the rodent equivalent of metabolic syndrome has added to evidence that the intestinal microbiome — a “garden” of bacterial, viral and fungal genes — plays a substantial role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mammals, including humans.
Released: February 5, 2018


After years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph).
Released: February 5, 2018


Enrolling in Medicaid may have health benefits not only for low-income parents but also for their children, according to a Johns Hopkins analysis of over 50,000 parent-child pairs.

Released: February 1, 2018

Two species may work together to drive tumor formation in hereditary colon cancer syndrome and sporadic colon cancer


Patients with an inherited form of colon cancer harbor two bacterial species that collaborate to encourage development of the disease, and the same species have been found in people who develop a sporadic form of colon cancer, a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy research team finds.
Released: February 1, 2018

$50 million gift to transform research and care of stroke globally


A new institute for stroke research and clinical care was announced today by the United Arab Emirates (UAE) Embassy in Washington, D.C., and Johns Hopkins. The Sheikh Khalifa Stroke Institute, funded by a $50 million gift from the United Arab Emirates, will focus Johns Hopkins’ efforts to leverage advances in engineering, artificial intelligence and precision medicine to better diagnose, treat and restore function to stroke patients. The gift is believed to be the largest ever for a stroke-specific initiative.  
Released: February 1, 2018


In a study of 61 people treated for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease, Johns Hopkins researchers conclude that fatigue, pain, insomnia and depression do indeed persist over long periods of time for some people, despite largely normal physical exams and clinical laboratory testing.
Released: January 30, 2018


Today, the Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH), an independent collaborative of international scientists, health professionals, scholars and policy experts convened by AARP, published Brain Food
Released: January 24, 2018

New research discovers two proteins pivotal to maintaining cancer stem cells, which cause chemotherapy resistance


Two different proteins work separately as well as synergistically to feed a small pool of stem cells that help bladder cancer resist chemotherapy, research led by a Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientist suggests. The finding, published online in Cancer Research, could lead to new targets to fight this deadly disease and potentially other cancers as well.

Released: January 24, 2018


Through the haze of a sonogram screen, an expectant mother catches a glimpse of the growing baby within her. The outline of a nose, chin and head, instantly recognizable as a tiny human, brings to life what parents, until then, could only imagine. Biologists, too, aim to bring their scientific discoveries to life by creating three-dimensional models—at the atomic level—of the inner workings of cells.
Released: January 23, 2018


Despite efforts over the past two decades to increase the number of black and Hispanic patients receiving kidney transplants from related or unrelated living donors, these racial/ethnic minority patients are still much less likely to undergo such transplants than white patients, Johns Hopkins researchers report. In fact, the investigators say, the disparities have worsened in the last 20 years.

Released: January 22, 2018

Johns Hopkins researcher and his team describe an approach they say could transform the field of diagnostic quality and safety


In an effort to reduce patient misdiagnoses and associated poor patient outcomes from lack of prompt treatment, a Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality researcher is helping to lead the way in providing hospitals a new approach to quantify and monitor diagnostic errors in their quality improvement efforts. The approach, called Symptom-Disease Pair Analysis of Diagnostic Error, or SPADE, is featured in a paper published today in BMJ Quality & Safety.