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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: May 18, 2018


A project in the radiation oncology outpatient unit at Johns Hopkins Hospital showed an improvement in clinician’s comfort level in responding to urgent patient care situations after a department-wide exercise focused on recognizing the signs when a patient’s condition was declining during their appointments.

Released: May 17, 2018


A small study of adults with the most common form of pancreatic cancer adds to evidence that patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations long linked to a high risk of breast cancer have poorer overall survival rates than those without the mutations.

Released: May 15, 2018

Burn expert joining the multidisciplinary team to advance burn care research and future discoveries


C. Scott Hultman, M.D., M.B.A., F.A.C.S., has joined the Department of Plastic Surgery as the new director of the Johns Hopkins Burn Center. He also will join the faculty at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery.
Released: May 15, 2018


Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan say they have found a fast way to manipulate a cell’s cilia, the tiny, fingerlike protrusions that “feel” and sense their microscopic environment. The experiments, performed in mouse cells, may advance scientists’ efforts to not only understand how the nanosized antennae work, but also how to repair them.

Released: May 15, 2018

Lorem Therapeutics will use support to enhance drug discovery efforts around critical cancer indications


The Johns Hopkins University announces that IP Group has funded the creation of Lorem Therapeutics as part of an ongoing collaboration between the university and the intellectual property commercialization company to explore, identify and commercialize technologies. Lorem will be focused on developing early-stage therapeutics, bridging the gap from drug discovery to investigative new drug (IND) status, specifically novel small molecule prodrugs for cancer indications.

Released: May 15, 2018


By analyzing reported physical activity levels over time in more than 11,000 American adults, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that increasing physical activity to recommended levels over as few as six years in middle age is associated with a significantly decreased risk of heart failure, a condition that affects an estimated 5 million to 6 million Americans.

Released: May 14, 2018


The High Value Practice Academic Alliance (HVPAA), led by Johns Hopkins Medicine, has collaborated with the Health Research and Educational Trust (HRET), the research, education and implementation science affiliate of the American Hospital Association (AHA), to host and direct the HVPAA’s annual High Value Health Care Conference on Sept. 21-23 at the Baltimore Convention Center.
Released: May 14, 2018


The annual meeting of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). The SAEM 2018 meeting will bring together more than 3,000 physicians, researchers, residents and medical students from around the world.
Released: May 14, 2018


The Johns Hopkins Rehabilitation Network is opening a new therapy clinic inside the acac Fitness & Wellness center in Timonium, Maryland. This model of business is becoming an increasingly popular way for health clubs and health systems to approach delivery of care, providing access to club members as well as patients in a community setting.

Released: May 14, 2018


Georgios Margonis, M.D., Ph.D., a surgical oncology fellow at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Matthew Weiss, M.D., surgical director of the Johns Hopkins Liver and Pancreas Cancer Multidisciplinary Clinics, report advances in efforts to improve the treatment and prognosis of colorectal cancers that have spread to the liver.

Released: May 9, 2018


A Johns Hopkins study found that physicians who use stigmatizing language in their patients’ medical records may affect the care those patients get for years to come.

Released: May 9, 2018


A Johns Hopkins breast cancer doctor will be honored by the Baltimore Orioles as a Birdland Community Hero at the team’s Mother’s Day game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.
Released: May 9, 2018

Protein clumping may contribute to heart failure development and could be used as a diagnostic tool for testing therapies or disease progression


Similar to how protein clumps build up in the brain in people with some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, protein clumps appear to accumulate in the diseased hearts of mice and people with heart failure, according to a team led by Johns Hopkins University researchers.

Released: May 8, 2018


Every year since 2008, the Johns Hopkins Center for Women’s Health, Sex, and Gender Research (formerly the Johns Hopkins Women’s Health Research Group) has hosted the Women’s Health Research Symposium to showcase research collaborations across Johns Hopkins’ schools of medicine, public health and nursing.
Released: May 8, 2018


Nancy Schoenborn, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and colleagues went straight to the source and conducted three qualitative studies that put older adults at the forefront in order to gain a better understanding of if, and how, they prefer to discuss various health topics.

Released: May 3, 2018


The annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS), which consists of The American Pediatric Society, the Society for Pediatric Research, the Academic Pediatric Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The PAS 2018 Meeting will bring together more than 8,000 pediatricians, research scientists, health care providers and policymakers from around the world.

 
Released: May 3, 2018


In studies with monkeys, Johns Hopkins researchers report that they have uncovered significant new details about how the cerebellum — the “learning machine” of the mammalian brain — makes predictions and learns from its mistakes, helping us execute complex motor actions such as accurately shooting a basketball into a net or focusing your eyes on an object across the room.
Released: May 1, 2018


When a new park is built, a tax is instituted on fast food or a ban put in place against soft drinks in a school, public health researchers must often rely on “after the fact” observational studies to evaluate the impact of such efforts on rates of obesity in a particular population and try to clearly identify and measure the factors that worked or didn’t.

Released: April 30, 2018

Patients also improperly store and dispose of opioids


A new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers adds to growing evidence that patients underuse nonopioid pain relievers to supplement opioid pain management after spine and joint surgery.
Released: April 26, 2018


A study of nearly 6,000 Americans followed for 24 years from middle to late adulthood found that having chronic inflammation in middle age may be linked to an increased risk of frailty and overall poorer health decades later.