In This Section      
Print This Page

Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

Topic

Family History of CVD

Family history of coronary heart disease and the incidence and progression of coronary artery calcification: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
By: Pandey AK, Blaha MJ, Sharma K, Rivera J, Budoff MJ, Blankstein R, Al-Mallah M, Wong ND, Shaw L, Carr J, O’Leary D, Lima JA, Szklo M, Blumenthal RS, Nasir K.

A multiethnic, population-based study showed that a family history of premature CHD is associated with enhanced development and progression of subclinical disease, independent of other risk factors.

Read on Pubmed
Family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) and markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease: Where do we stand?
By: Pandey AK, Pandey S, Blaha MJ, Agatston A, Feldman T, Ozner M, Santos RD, Budoff MJ, Blumenthal RS, Nasir K.
Family history of coronary artery disease is associated with markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, and this relationship remains statistically significant after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Our data suggest these individuals should be considered strongly as candidates for assessment of subclinical CVD to further refine risk and treatment goals.
Read on Pubmed
Epidemiology and natural history of peripheral artery disease.
By: Ratchford EV, Salameh MJ.
General Cardiovascular Risk Profile identifies advanced coronary artery calcium and is improved by family history: the multiethnic study of atherosclerosis.
By: Scheuner MT, Setodji CM, Pankow JS, Blumenthal RS, Keeler E.
The General Cardiovascular Risk Profile is a multivariable model that predicts global cardiovascular disease risk. Our goal was to assess the ability of the Profile to identify individuals with advanced CAC, an emerging indication for aggressive risk factor modification. Data show that incorporation of family history, especially comprehensive familial risk stratification, provides incremental prognostic value in determining whether identification is improved with family history.
Read on Pubmed