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Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

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Disparities in Care

Creating a transdisciplinary research center to reduce cardiovascular health disparities in Baltimore, Maryland: Lessons learned.
By: Cooper LA, Boulware LE, Miller ER, Golden SH, Carson KA, Noronha G, Huizinga MM, Roter DL, Yeh HC, Bone LR, Levine DM, Hill-Briggs F, Charleston J, Kim MT, Wang NY, Aboumatar HJ, Halbert JP, Ephraim PL, Brancati FL.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) disparities continue to have a negative impact on African Americans in the United States, largely because of uncontrolled hypertension. Despite the availability of evidence-based interventions, their use has not been translated into clinical and public health practice. The Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities is a new transdisciplinary research program with a stated goal to lower the impact of CVD disparities on vulnerable populations in Baltimore, Maryland. By targeting multiple levels of influence on the core problem of disparities in Baltimore, the center leverages academic, community, and national partnerships and a novel structure to support 3 research studies and to train the next generation of CVD researchers. We also share the early lessons learned in the center's design.

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Methods for estimation of disparities in medication use in an observational cohort study: results from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
By: McClelland RL, Jorgensen NW, Post WS, Szklo M, Kronmal RA.
Evaluating disparities in health care is an important aspect of understanding differences in disease risk. The purpose of this study is to describe the methodology for estimating such disparities, to provide improved disparity estimation in a large multi-ethnic cohort study.
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Metabolic syndrome risk profiles among African-American adolescents: national health and nutrition examination survey, 2003-2010.
By: Fitzpatrick SL, Lai BS, Brancati FL, Golden SH, Hill-Briggs F.

Although African American adolescents have the highest prevalence of obesity, they have the lowest prevalence of metabolic syndrome across all definitions used in previous research. To address this paradox, we sought to develop a model of the metabolic syndrome specific to African American adolescents. Our findings provide a plausible model of the metabolic syndrome specific to African American adolescents. Based on this model, approximately 19 and 16% of African American boys and girls, respectively, are at high risk for having the metabolic syndrome.

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