In This Section      
 

Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

Topic

Cigarette Smoking

Landmark Articles

The relationship of cigarette smoking with inflammation and subclinical vascular disease: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
By: McEvoy J, Nasir K, DeFilippis A, Lima J, Bluemke D, Hundley WG, Barr RG, Budoff M, Szklo M, Navas-Acien A, Polak J, Blumenthal R, Post W, Blaha M.

We sought to assess the impact of smoking status, cumulative pack-years, and time since cessation (the latter in former smokers only) on 3 important domains of cardiovascular disease: inflammation, vascular dynamics and function, and subclinical atherosclerosis. These findings expand our understanding of the harmful effects of smoking and help explain the cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation.

Read on Pubmed
A clinician’s guide to the updated ABCs of cardiovascular disease prevention.
By: Kohli P, Whelton SP, Hsu S, Yancy CW, Stone NJ, Chrispin J, Gilotra NA, Houston B, Ashen MD, Martin SS, Joshi PH, McEvoy JW, Gluckman TJ, Michos ED, Blaha MJ, Blumenthal RS.

To facilitate the guideline-based implementation of treatment recommendations in the ambulatory setting and to encourage participation in the multiple preventive health efforts that exist, we have organized several recent guideline updates into a simple ABCDEF approach. We would remind clinicians that evidence-based medicine is meant to inform recommendations but that synthesis of patient-specific data and use of appropriate clinical judgment in each individual situation is ultimately preferred.

Read on Pubmed
Cigarette smoking worsens systemic inflammation in persons with metabolic syndrome.
By: Jamal O, Aneni EC, Shaharyar S, Ali SS, Parris D, McEvoy JW, Veledar E, Blaha MJ, Blumenthal RS, Agatston AS, Coceicao RD, Feldman T, Carvalho JA, Santos RD, Nasir K.

Emerging data suggests that the combination of smoking and metabolic syndrome (MetS) markedly increases cardiovascular disease risk well beyond that of either condition. In this study we assess if this interaction can be explained by an additive increase in the risk of systemic inflammation by MetS and cigarette smoking. The study demonstrates an additive effect of cigarette smoking on the risk of systemic inflammation in MetS thus highlighting the need for determining smoking status among those with MetS and aggressively targeting smoking cessation in this population.

Read on Pubmed
2013 AHA/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk.
By: Abd TT, Misra S, Ojeifo O, Martin SS, Blumenthal RS, Foody J, Wong ND.
The 2013 lifestyle guidelines provide guidance in three narrowly focused areas: 1) the effect of dietary patterns and macronutrient composition on CVD risk factors; 2) the effect of sodium and potassium on CVD risk factors; and 3) the effect of physical activity on blood pressure and lipids.
Read on Pubmed
Cigarette smoking is associated with increased mortality in both the presence and absence of coronary artery calcification.
By: McEvoy JW, Blaha MJ, Rivera JJ, Budoff MJ, Khan AN, Shaw LJ, Berman DS, Raggi P, Min JK, Rumberger JA, Callister TQ, Blumenthal RS, Nasir K.

The aim of this study was to further explore the interplay between smoking status, coronary artery calcium (CAC), and all-cause mortality. Smoking is a risk factor for death across the entire spectrum of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Smokers with any CAC had significantly higher mortality than smokers without CAC, a finding with implications for smokers undergoing lung cancer CT-based screening. However, the absence of CAC might not be as useful a "negative risk factor" in active smokers, because this group has mortality rates similar to nonsmokers with mild-to-moderate atherosclerosis.

Read on Pubmed
Mortality rates in smokers and nonsmokers in the presence or absence of coronary artery calcification.
By: McEvoy JW, Blaha MJ, Rivera JJ, Budoff MJ, Khan AN, Shaw LJ, Berman DS, Raggi P, Min JK, Rumberger JA, Callister TQ, Blumenthal RS, Nasir K.

The aim of this study was to further explore the interplay between smoking status, coronary artery calcium (CAC), and all-cause mortality. Smoking is a risk factor for death across the entire spectrum of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Smokers with any CAC had significantly higher mortality than smokers without CAC, a finding with implications for smokers undergoing lung cancer CT-based screening. However, the absence of CAC might not be as useful a "negative risk factor" in active smokers, because this group has mortality rates similar to nonsmokers with mild-to-moderate atherosclerosis.

Read on Pubmed
Approach to smoking cessation in the patient with vascular disease.
By: Ratchford EV, Black JH 3rd.
In the patient with vascular disease, cigarette smoking is particularly perilous; the benefits of smoking cessation greatly exceed any risks associated with pharmacologic treatment. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of pharmacologic therapy for smoking cessation. In parallel with aggressive counseling and pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation, cardiovascular risk reduction is critical.
Read on Pubmed
Coffee, alcohol, smoking, physical activity and QT interval duration: results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
By: Zhang Y, Post WS, Dalal D, Blasco-Colmenares E, Tomaselli GF, Guallar E.
Abnormalities in the electrocardiographic QT interval duration have been associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, there is substantial uncertainty about the effect of modifiable factors such as coffee intake, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity on QT interval duration. We studied 7,795 men and women from NHANES III. Binge drinking was associated with longer QT interval in men but not in women. QT interval duration was not associated with other modifiable factors, including coffee and tea intake, smoking, and physical activity.
Read on Pubmed
Perceived racial/ethnic discrimination, smoking and alcohol consumption in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
By: Borrell LN, Diez Roux AV, Jacobs DR Jr, Shea S, Jackson SA, Shrager S, Blumenthal RS.

We examined the association of perceived racial/ethnic discrimination with smoking and alcohol consumption in adults participating in the MESA study. Our findings suggest that the experience of discrimination is associated with greater prevalence of unhealthy behaviors. Specifically, the use of smoking and alcohol may be patterned by experience of discrimination.

Read on Pubmed