In This Section      
 

Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

Topic

Nutrition, Vitamins, Supplements

Relation of hepatic steatosis to atherogenic dyslipidemia.
By: Makadia SS, Blaha M, Keenan T, Ndumele C, Jones S, DeFilippis A, Martin S, Kohli P, Conceicao R, Carvalho J, Nasir K, Blumenthal R, Santos RD.
Hepatic steatosis may play a direct metabolic role in conferring increased cardiovascular risk.
Read on Pubmed
Omega-3 fatty acid blood levels: clinical significance and controversy.
By: Superko HR, Superko SM, Nasir K, Agatston A, Garrett BC.
Read on Pubmed
25-Hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone are not associated with carotid intima-media thickness or plaque in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.
By: Blondon M, Sachs M, Hoofnagle AN, Ix JH, Michos ED, Korcarz C, Gepner AD, Siscovick DS, Kaufman JD, Stein JH, Kestenbaum B, de Boer IH.
The consistent lack of association of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone with carotid intima-media thickness and plaque suggests that these hormones may influence cardiovascular risk through pathways not reflected by carotid atherosclerosis.
Read on Pubmed
25-Hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone are not associated with carotid intima-media thickness or plaque in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
By: Blondon M, Sachs M, Hoofnagle AN, Ix JH, Michos ED, Korcarz C, Gepner AD, Siscovick DS, Kaufman JD, Stein JH, Kestenbaum B, de Boer IH.
This study shows that the consistent lack of association of vitamin D and parathyroid hormone with carotid intima-media thickness and plaque suggests that these hormones may influence cardiovascular risk through pathways not reflected by carotid atherosclerosis.
Read on Pubmed
Vitamin D, calcium, and atherosclerotic risk: evidence from serum levels and supplementation studies.
By: Lutsey PL, Michos ED.
This review summarizes evidence of the relationship between vitamin D, calcium supplements, and cardiovascular disease, and comments on the recent Institute of Medicine recommendations regarding use of these nutrients.
Read on Pubmed
Vitamin D for the prevention of stroke incidence and disability: Promising but too early for prime time.
By: Michos ED, Gottesman RF.
Read on Pubmed
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with silent coronary artery disease in cardiovascularly asymptomatic African-Americans with HIV infection.
By: Lai H, Gerstenblith G, Fishman EK, Brinker J, Kickler T, Tong W, Bhatia S, Hong T, Chen S, Li J, Detrick B, Lai S.
Both vitamin D deficiency and silent CAD are prevalent in HIV-infected African-Americans. In addition to management of traditional CAD risk factors and substance abuse, vitamin D deficiency should be evaluated in HIV-infected African-Americans. These data support the conduct of a prospective trial of vitamin D in this high-risk patient population.
Read on Pubmed
Vitamin D deficiency is associated with the development of subclinical coronary artery disease in African-Americans with HIV infection: a preliminary study.
By: Lai H, Detrick B, Fishman EK, Gerstenblith G, Brinker JA, Hollis BW, Bartlett J, Cofrancesco J Jr, Tong W, Tai H, Chen S, Bhatia S, Lai S.
The incidence of subclinical CAD in African-Americans with HIV infection is provocatively high. Larger studies are warranted to confirm the role of vitamin D deficiency in the development of CAD in HIV-infected African-Americans.
Read on Pubmed
25-Hydroxyvitamin D deficiency is associated with fatal stroke among whites but not blacks: The NHANES-III linked mortality files.
By: Michos ED, Reis JP, Post WS, Lutsey PL, Gottesman RF, Mosley TH, Sharrett AR, Melamed ML.

Deficient 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality. 25(OH)D deficiency and stroke are more prevalent in blacks. We examined whether low 25(OH)D contributes to the excess risk of fatal stroke in blacks compared with whites. Vitamin D deficiency was associated with an increased risk of stroke death in whites but not in blacks. Although blacks had a higher rate of fatal stroke compared with whites, the low 25(OH)D levels in blacks were unrelated to stroke incidence. Therefore 25(OH)D levels did not explain this excess risk.

Read on Pubmed
Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, phosphorus, and electrocardiographic QT interval duration: findings from NHANES III and ARIC.
By: Zhang Y, Post WS, Dalal D, Bansal S, Blasco-Colmenares E, Jan De Beur S, Alonso A, Soliman EZ, Whitsel EA, Brugada R, Tomaselli GF, Guallar E.
Disturbances in 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, and phosphorus concentrations have been associated with increased risks of total and cardiovascular mortality. It is possible that changes in electrocardiographic QT interval duration may mediate these effects, but the association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, phosphorus, and calcium concentrations with QT interval duration has not been evaluated in general population samples. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, phosphorus, and calcium concentrations with QT interval duration in two large samples of the U.S. population. QT interval duration was inversely associated with the serum total and ionized calcium and positively associated with serum phosphorus.
Read on Pubmed