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Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

Topic

Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

Landmark Articles

Hot, cool, cold: The future of phospholipid A2 as a therapeutic target for CHD.
By: Houston B, Martin SS.
This article reviewed the state-of-the-art research involving inhibition of phospholipid A2 to reduce subsequent cardiovascular events.
Coronary artery calcium testing: exploring the need for a randomized trial.
By: McEvoy JW, Blaha MJ.
Read on Pubmed
Neck circumference is not associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in retired national football league players.
By: Pokharel Y, Macedo FY, Nambi V, Martin SS, Nasir K, Wong ND, Boone J, Roberts AJ, Ballantyne CM, Virani SS.
In retired NFL players with a high prevalence of CAC and carotid artery plaque, neck circumference was not associated with coronary or carotid subclinical atherosclerosis.
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Headed in the right direction but at risk for miscalculation: a critical appraisal of the 2013 ACC/AHA risk assessment guideline.
By: Amin NP, Martin SS, Blaha MJ, Nasir K, Blumenthal RS, Michos ED.
The newly released 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline for Assessing Cardiovascular Risk was a major advance over prior guidelines, but the new risk equations do not appear to lead to significantly better discrimination than older models. Since the same risk factors are incorporated, using the new risk estimators may lead to inaccurate assessment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in certain groups of patients. There also is likely an overestimation of risk when applied to modern populations. Future guidelines could provide clearer direction on which individuals would benefit from additional testing for more personalized preventive therapies.
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2013 American cholesterol treatment guideline: what was done well and what could be done better.
By: Martin SS, Abd TT, Jones SR, Michos ED, Blumenthal RS, Blaha MJ.
This article critically appraises the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol. The guideline succeeds in prioritizing statin therapy, expanding focus to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease including stroke, and in emphasizing absolute cardiovascular risk to determine statin eligibility.
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Associations of Pentraxin 3 with cardiovascular disease: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
By: Jenny NS, Blumenthal RS, Kronmal RA, Rotter JI, Siscovick DS, Psaty BM.
In a study of apparently healthy adults, Pentraxin 3 was associated with CVD risk factors, subclinical CVD, CAC and incident coronary heart disease events independent of C-reactive protein (CRP) and CVD risk factors. These results support the hypothesis that PTX3 reflects different aspects of inflammation than CRP and may provide additional insight into the development and progression of atherosclerosis.
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Fibroblast growth factor-23 and incident coronary heart disease, heart failure, and cardiovascular mortality: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.
By: Lutsey PL, Alonso A, Selvin E, Pankow JS, Michos ED, Agarwal SK, Loehr LR, Eckfeldt JH, Coresh J.
High levels of serum FGF-23 were associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, heart failure, and cardiovascular mortality in this large, biracial, population-based cohort.
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Letter regarding article, “Taking a longer term view of cardiovascular risk: the causal exposure paradigm.”
By: Joshi PH, Blaha MJ, Martin SS, Blumenthal RS.
Understanding the high prevalence of diabetes in U.S. South Asians compared with four racial/ethnic groups: The MASALA and MESA Studies.
By: Kanaya AM, Herrington D, Vittinghoff E, Ewing SK, Liu K, Blaha MJ, Dave SS, Qureshi F, Kandula NR.
This study compared South Asians with four other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. to determine whether socio-demographic, lifestyle, or metabolic factors could explain the higher diabetes prevalence and whether insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction occurred at younger ages and/or lower adiposity levels compared with other groups.
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Coronary artery calcium and physical fitness — the two best predictors of long-term survival.
By: Blaha MJ, Feldman DI, Nasir K.
Read on Pubmed