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Ciccarone Articles

Ciccarone Center Research

Journal

Diabetes Care

Landmark Article

NIDDK international conference report on diabetes and depression: Current understanding and future directions.
By: Holt RIG, deGroot M, Lucki I, Hunter CM, Sartorius N, Golden SH.
Comorbid diabetes and depression are a major clinical challenge as the outcomes of each condition are worsened by the other. This article summarizes the presentations and discussions during an international meeting on diabetes and depression convened by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) in collaboration with the National Institute of Mental Health and the Dialogue on Diabetes and Depression.
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Understanding the high prevalence of diabetes in U.S. South Asians compared with four racial/ethnic groups: The MASALA and MESA Studies.
By: Kanaya AM, Herrington D, Vittinghoff E, Ewing SK, Liu K, Blaha MJ, Dave SS, Qureshi F, Kandula NR.
This study compared South Asians with four other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. to determine whether socio-demographic, lifestyle, or metabolic factors could explain the higher diabetes prevalence and whether insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction occurred at younger ages and/or lower adiposity levels compared with other groups.
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Cardiometabolic risk is associated with atherosclerotic burden and prognosis: results from the partners coronary computed tomography angiography registry.
By: Hulten E, Bittencourt MS, O’Leary D, Shah R, Ghoshhajra B, Christman MP, Montana P, Steigner M, Truong QA, Nasir K, Rybicki F, Hainer J, Brady TJ, Di Carli MF, Hoffmann U, Abbara S, Blankstein R.
Patients without diabetes who have multiple metabolic risk factors have a similar prognosis and burden of CAD as those with Type 2 diabetes not requiring insulin.
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Response to comment on: Draznin et al. Pathways to quality inpatient management of hyperglycemia and diabetes: a call to action. Diabetes Care.
By: Draznin B, Gilden J, Golden SH, Inzucchi S; PRIDE Investigators.
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Validity of meta-analysis in diabetes: meta-analysis is an indispensable tool in evidence synthesis.
By: Golden SH, Bass EB.
This article presents supporting arguments to support the use for meta-analysis in diabetes clinical research in a pro-con debate.
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Pathways to quality inpatient management of hyperglycemia and diabetes: A call to action.
By: Draznin B, Gilden J, Golden SH, Inzucchi SE; PRIDE investigators.
This paper outlines eight aspects of inpatient glucose management (four as system-based issues and four as patient-based issues) in which randomized clinical trials are needed, and urges further progress in the science of inpatient diabetes management.
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Christopher Dyer Saudek, MD: diabetes expert and implantable insulin pump pioneer.
By: Golden SH, Kalyani RR, Donner T.
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Metabolic syndrome risk profiles among African American adolescents: national health and nutrition examination survey, 2003-2010.
By: Fitzpatrick SL, Lai BS, Brancati FL, Golden SH, Hill-Briggs F.

Although African-American adolescents have the highest prevalence of obesity, they have the lowest prevalence of metabolic syndrome across all definitions used in previous research. To address this paradox, we sought to develop a model of the metabolic syndrome specific to African-American adolescents. Our findings provide a plausible model of the metabolic syndrome specific to African-American adolescents. Based on this model, approximately 19% and 16% of African-American boys and girls, respectively, are at high risk for having the metabolic syndrome.

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A systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between depression and insulin resistance.
By: Kan C, Silva N, Golden SH, Rajala U, Timonen M, Stahl D, Ismail K.
This study found that a small but significant cross-sectional association was observed between depression and insulin resistance, despite heterogeneity between studies.
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Metabolic syndrome risk profiles among African-American adolescents: national health and nutrition examination survey, 2003-2010.
By: Fitzpatrick SL, Lai BS, Brancati FL, Golden SH, Hill-Briggs F.

Although African American adolescents have the highest prevalence of obesity, they have the lowest prevalence of metabolic syndrome across all definitions used in previous research. To address this paradox, we sought to develop a model of the metabolic syndrome specific to African American adolescents. Our findings provide a plausible model of the metabolic syndrome specific to African American adolescents. Based on this model, approximately 19 and 16% of African American boys and girls, respectively, are at high risk for having the metabolic syndrome.

Read on Pubmed