In This Section      
Print This Page

Academic Kudos


The exceptional work of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine faculty and trainees is frequently recognized with honors and awards. These range from Nobel Prizes to medical-society honors to graduate student fellowships.
Let us know about your own or someone else’s award.

Congratulations to the honorees!
 

Submit Your Kudos

Peter Pronovost

Peter Pronovost Earns David E. Rogers Award

Peter Pronovost, M.D., Ph.D., senior vice president of Patient Safety and Quality and professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine, has received the David E. Rogers Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), which is dedicated to transforming health care through innovative medical education, cutting-edge patient care and groundbreaking medical research. The award is granted annually to a member of a medical school faculty who has made major contributions to improving the health and health care of Americans. Pronovost was among those honored during the AAMC’s annual meeting on Nov. 5.

Joshua Yang

Joshua Yang Gets First-Place Grant Award from Integrated DNA Technologies

Joshua Y. Yang, an M.D. student and a Ph.D. student in the Department of Bioengineering, was the first-place winner of a 2017 IDT Synthetic Biology Grant Program award given by Integrated DNA Technologies. The program seeks to empower the next generation of world-changing companies by providing vital reagents to early-stage companies working in the fields of human health and sustainable manufacturing or on humanitarian causes. Yang received the grant through his diagnostics assay company, Helispot, which was spun out of technology at Johns Hopkins. He plans to use the grant to develop novel functions in helicase enzymes to enable low-cost diagnostics in point-of-care and low-resource settings.

Michael Paulaitis

Research on Macular Degeneration Earns Michael Paulaitis a $160,000 Grant

Michael Paulaitis, Ph.D., a professor of ophthalmology at Wilmer Eye Institute, has received a $160,000 grant for his research on macular degeneration from Maryland-based nonprofit BrightFocus, which is a leading source of funding and support for scientific research to defeat Alzheimer’s, glaucoma and macular degeneration. Paulaitis says "the novel concepts put forth in this study, of investigating small molecules called microRNAs to see what they can tell us about mitochondria disorders in cells of the retina, hold great promise of providing new insights into how age-related macular degeneration develops, after which new treatments can be designed to save or improve vision."

Karen Horton

Karen Horton Named Director of Department of Radiology and Radiological Science

Karen M. Horton, M.D., has been named director of the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science. She had been interim director of the department and chairman of the board of Johns Hopkins Medical Imaging, LLC, since February 2016. Horton has distinguished herself as an innovative and effective leader since joining the radiology faculty as an assistant professor in 1998. In 2008, she became the 144th woman within the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to be promoted to professor. She is a prolific researcher and a leading authority in the radiology community for her expertise on body CT imaging, 3-D post-processing of CT data and virtual colonoscopy.

Heather Sateia

Heather Sateia Gets a Leadership Role in Osler Medical Training Program

Heather Sateia, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine, has been chosen as the associate program director in the Osler Medical Training Program. She is joining the program to focus on equity, diversity and culture, with the goal of enhancing the resident experience. Sateia is a fulltime member of the Division of General Internal Medicine. Her areas of clinical expertise include internal medicine, preventive medicine and primary care.
 

Antonio Wolff

Antonio Wolff Earns a $200,000 Komen Grant for Trial Aimed at Quality of Care for Breast Cancer Patients

Komen Scholar Antonio Wolff, M.D., professor of oncology, has received a Susan G. Komen research grant of $200,000 to run a pilot clinical trial aimed at improving communications between breast cancer patients, caregivers and doctors in an outpatient setting. The main goal of the trial is to determine if improving this communication leads to better management of the patient’s care and improves the patient’s quality of life.

Zaver Bhujwaller

For Zaver Bhujwalla, an Outstanding Investigator Award and a Gold Medal Award

Zaver Bhujwalla, M.Sc., Ph.D., a professor of radiology and radiological science, has received an NCI Outstanding Investigator Award R35 Grant from the National Cancer Institute. The grant supports investigators with outstanding records of productivity in cancer research by providing extended funding stability and encouraging recipients to continue or embark on projects of unusual potential in cancer research. It provides up to $600,000 in direct costs per year for seven years, allowing substantial time for funded investigators to take greater risks and be more adventurous in their research. Bhujwalla’s grant will aid her as she works to expand the understanding of cancer through the applications of molecular and functional imaging. Bhujwalla also has received the Gold Medal Award from the World Molecular Imaging Society — the highest award given at the World Molecular Imaging Congress — for her outstanding contributions to the field of molecular imaging.

Fengquan Zhou

Feng-Quan Zhou's Study on Glaucoma Earns a $150,000 Grant

Feng-Quan Zhou, Ph.D., an associate professor of orthopaedic surgery and neuroscience, has received a $150,000 grant for his research on glaucoma from Maryland-based nonprofit BrightFocus, which is a leading source of funding and support for scientific research to defeat Alzheimer’s, glaucoma and macular degeneration. Zhou's study aims to investigate two novel approaches for promoting long distance (i.e., eye to brain) optic nerve regeneration. "I [am] impressed with advances in optic nerve regeneration. If more innovative studies could be devoted to this field, we may be able to restore vision for patients," he says.

Ben Ho Park

Ben Ho Park Receives $600,000 Susan G. Komen Research Grant

Komen Scholar Ben Ho Park, M.D., Ph.D., professor of oncology, has received a Susan G. Komen research grant of $600,000 to design a treatment strategy to target abnormal proteins only found in cancer cells, which result from a mutation in a specific gene called SF3B1. The goal of this research is to help develop new therapies for breast cancer patients with this gene mutation.

Rebecca Gottesman

Rebecca Gottesman Named Secretary of American Neurological Association

Rebecca Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., professor of neurology, has been named secretary of the American Neurological Association, a professional society of academic neurologists and neuroscientists devoted to advancing the goals of academic neurology, to training and educating neurologists and other physicians in the neurologic sciences, and to expanding the understanding of diseases of the nervous system and the ability to treat them.

John Cameron

John Cameron Gets Giants of Cancer Care Award

John Cameron, M.D., professor of surgery, has been given a 2017 Giants of Cancer Care award by OncLive, an oncology information network and community. This national award celebrates the exceptional achievements of leading researchers and educators in oncology research and clinical practice. Recipients of the award are hailed as icons, innovators and pioneers in the field of oncology. Cameron was presented with two commemorative plaques: one, in recognition of his work as one of the top pancreatic surgeons in the world, and a second, in recognition of the integral role Johns Hopkins Medicine plays in the treatment of complex hepatopancreatobiliary surgical cases.
 

Ahmet Hoke

Ahmet Hoke Named to Board of Directors of American Neurological Association

Ahmet Hoke, M.D., Ph.D., professor of neurology, has been named to the board of directors of the American Neurological Association, a professional society of academic neurologists and neuroscientists devoted to advancing the goals of academic neurology, to training and educating neurologists and other physicians in the neurologic sciences, and to expanding the understanding of diseases of the nervous system and the ability to treat them.

Michelle Rudek

Michelle Rudek Receives Oncology Development Award and Lectureship

Michelle Rudek,  Ph.D., Pharm. D., an associate professor of oncology at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, is the 2017 recipient of the Michaele Christian Oncology Development Award and Lectureship given by the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program. The award was established by the program in 2007 to honor the 20-year career of Michaele C. Christian at the National Cancer Institute. Rudek has been a leader in oncology clinical translational research, with a focus on clinical pharmacology in early-phase trials and special populations in oncology. She also has been committed to mentoring and encouraging young translational investigators throughout her career.

Justin McArthur

Justin McArthur Named President-Elect of American Neurological Association

Justin McArthur, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., professor of neurology, has been named president-elect of the American Neurological Association (ANA) for 2017-2019. The ANA is a professional society of academic neurologists and neuroscientists devoted to advancing the goals of academic neurology, to training and educating neurologists and other physicians in the neurologic sciences, and to expanding the understanding of diseases of the nervous system and the ability to treat them.

Lauren Jansson

Lauren Jansson Receives $3 Million Award for Study on Opioid Drug’s Effects on Fetuses and Infants

Lauren M. Jansson, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics, has been awarded $3 million over a five-year period for research titled “Maternal buprenorphine-naloxone treatment in the perinatal period: Fetal and infant effects.” The award comes from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The goal of the study is to explore the effects of buprenorphine-naloxone, a medication used to treat opioid dependency during pregnancy, by evaluating maternal and fetal physiology in the second half of pregnancy.

Leticia Ryan

Leticia Ryan Named to Interdisciplinary Research Leaders Program

Leticia Manning Ryan, M.D., M.P.H., director of research, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, and assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, has been selected to join Interdisciplinary Research Leaders, a leadership development program led by the University of Minnesota with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She will be a member of one of only 15 three-person teams chosen to participate in this national program. (More than 200 teams applied.) Ryan and the other members of this diverse group of researchers and community leaders, including directors of nonprofits, psychologists and community organizers, will collaborate and innovate to solve persistent health challenges facing communities.

David Newman-Toker

David Newman-Toker Named President-Elect of the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine

David Newman-Toker, M.D., Ph.D., professor of neurology, ophthalmology and otolaryngology and director of the Armstrong Institute Center for Diagnostic Excellence at Johns Hopkins Medicine, has been named president-elect of the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine. He will serve a one-year term beginning November 2018. “The Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine is a small organization that is making a huge impact on the field of diagnostic safety and quality in pursuit of its vision to eliminate harms from diagnostic error, says Newman-Toker.  "We are raising awareness of the problem, rallying stakeholders to the cause and taking concrete actions to enhance research to reduce harms from delayed or missed diagnosis. I am very proud to be part of this critical work needed to solve this major public health problem.”

James Harris

James Harris Receives Catcher in the Rye Award from American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

James C. Harris, M.D., founding director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program at Johns Hopkins University and the Kennedy Krieger Institute, and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and pediatrics, received the Catcher in the Rye Advocacy Award to an individual at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The award credits Harris for being a “steadfast advocate” who has “worked tirelessly on behalf of children, adolescents, and their families.”

Pranita Tamma

Pranita Tamma Receives Pediatric Scholarship Award

Pranita Tamma, M.D., M.H.S., has received the 2017 Pediatric Scholarship Award from the Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) for her contributions to the study of antimicrobial resistance and for her antimicrobial stewardship, under the mentorship of Sara Cosgrove, M.D. Tamma is an assistant professor of pediatrics. Her research focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of multidrug-resistant gram-negative infections in children and adults.

Eric Bass kudos

Eric Bass named CEO of Society of General Internal Medicine

Eric B. Bass, M.D., M.P.H., professor of medicine, is the Society of General Internal Medicine’s new chief executive officer. Bass will begin this part-time position immediately while continuing to work with the Evidence-based Practice Center and with the Scholarly Concentration in Public Health and Community Service, in addition to continuing his clinical practice at Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center and serving the Department of Medicine as the vice chair for faculty development and promotions.
 

Caren Meyers

Caren Meyers Among Researchers Jointly Awarded $3 Million to Improve HIV Drugs

Collaborating researchers, including Caren Meyers, M.S., Ph.D., an associate professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences, have received a $3 million award from the National Institutes of Health to generate new technologies for long-acting administration of antiretroviral drugs for HIV treatment. The research is a collaboration between the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the University of Liverpool. “The synergistic partnership between the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has enabled the smooth translation of basic medicinal chemistry and materials science concepts to proof-of-concept preclinical models," Meyers says. “This award will push forward our collaborative efforts to meet a need for complete long-acting therapeutic options for HIV.”

Paul Sponseller

Paul Sponseller Named Vice President of the Scoliosis Research Society

Paul Sponseller, M.D., professor of orthopaedic surgery and chief of the Division of Pediatric Orthopaedics, has been named vice president of the Scoliosis Research Society, an international organization with a world-renowned leadership and a commitment to research and education in the field of spinal deformities. Membership includes more than 1,000 of the world's leading spine surgeons, researchers, physician assistants and orthotists who are involved in research and treatment of spinal deformities.
 

Paul Auwaerter

Paul Auwaerter Named President of Infectious Disease Society of America

Paul Auwaerter, M.D., M.B.A., professor of medicine and clinical director of the Division of Infectious Diseases, has been named president of the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). His term begins Oct. 9, 2017 and lasts for one year. The IDSA has more than 11,000 member physicians and scientists devoted to patient care, prevention, public health, education and research in the area of infectious diseases.

Joshua Yang

Joshua Yang Awarded Thermo Fisher Scientific Antibody Scholarship Award

Joshua Y. Yang, a student in the M.D.-Ph.D. program, was one of six people to receive a Fall 2017 Thermo Fisher Scientific Antibody Scholarship Award. The award, given by the U.S. biotech company Thermo Fisher Scientific, is based on a review of undergraduate and graduate transcripts, honors and awards, recommendation letters, publication/abstract record and an essay on the importance of antibody standards in biomedical research.

Kathleen Schwarz

Kathleen Schwarz Gets Lifetime Contribution Award

Kathleen B. Schwarz, M.D., professor of pediatrics, has been named the 2017 NASPGHAN Shwachman Award winner for her lifelong scientific and educational contributions in the field of pediatric gastroenterology. NASPGHAN — the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition — strives to improve the care of infants, children and adolescents with digestive disorders by promoting advances in clinical care, research and education. Schwarz will receive her award at the organization's annual meeting in November.

Allatah Mekile

Allatah Mekile Wins Fellowship from Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Allatah Mekile, a Ph.D. candidate in the Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, Department of Physiology, is one of 39 new Gilliam fellows. They are exceptional doctoral students who have the potential to be leaders in their fields and the desire to advance diversity and inclusion in the sciences, according to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the awarding organization. The Gilliam Fellowship for Advanced Study offers each fellow an annual award totaling $46,000, which includes a stipend, a training allowance and an institutional allowance, for up to three years. Mekile says she plans to use her award to establish a link between gene variants in patients and autism-like neurological disorders.

Gerald Hart

Gerald Hart Receives Herbert Tabor Research Award

Gerald W. Hart, Ph.D., Paul and Christine Englund Professor and director of the Department of Biological Chemistry, has received the Herbert Tabor Research Award from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The award honors the recipient's excellence in biological chemistry and molecular biology and contributions to the community of scientists.

Julia Johnson

Julia Johnson and Team Receive Two CDC Contracts for Study on Preventing Neonatal Infections

Julia Johnson, M.D., neonatologist and assistant professor of pediatrics, is leading a team of researchers who've been awarded two contracts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the study "Preventing Neonatal Healthcare Associated Infections in Low Resource Settings." The study, conducted at four sites in Pune, India, will describe the epidemiology of neonatal sepsis in the ICU, assess the impact of several interventions on infection rates and ascertain the relationship between between bacteria colonizing mothers and neonatal infection. “Globally, neonatal mortality due to infections continues to be unacceptably high, including in the hospital setting," Johnson says. "We hope to better understand the source of infections in hospitalized critically ill neonates, allowing us to design locally effective and appropriate interventions to reduce the risk of infection, which can ultimately be applied in other similar settings.”

James Ficke

James Ficke Appointed to National Trauma Institute's Board of Directors

The National Trauma Institute (NTI), a nonprofit organization that advocates for increased federal funding for trauma research and research infrastructure to reduce death and disability, elected five new members to its board of directors in August, including James Ficke, M.D., a professor of orthopaedic surgery and director of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. "I look forward to working with the other members of the NTI board in advancing its important mission,” saya Ficke, who will serve as the liaison member from the Orthopaedic Trauma Association.

Robert Wood

Robert Wood Named President-Elect of American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Robert A. Wood, M.D., professor of pediatrics and an internationally recognized expert on food allergy and childhood asthma, has been named president-elect of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. This professional organization has more than 7,000 members in the United States, Canada and 72 other countries. Members include allergist/immunologists, other medical specialists, allied health and related healthcare professionals — all with an interest in the research and treatment of allergic and immunologic diseases.

Meghan Vermillion

Meghan Vermillion Receives Young Investigator Award

Meghan Vermillion, D.V.M., a fellow in the Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology Program, has received a 2017 Young Investigator Award from the National Veterinary Medical Association & the American Veterinary Medical Foundation. The award, which was given to Vermillion at the National Veterinary Scholars Symposium hosted by the National Institutes of Health, honors the excellence of her ongoing doctoral dissertation work modeling congenital Zika virus infection in immunocompetent mice under the mentorship of Sabra Klein, Ph.D., through the Cellular and Molecular Medicine graduate program.
 

Evan Worden

Evan Worden Wins a Fellowship Award from Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has granted prestigious, four-year fellowship awards to 18 top young scientists, including Evan J. Worden, Ph.D., a post-doctoral fellow in the Biophysics & Biochemistry Program. The fellowships encourage the nation's most promising young scientists to pursue careers in cancer research by providing them with independent funding ($231,000 each) to work on innovative projects that have the potential to impact cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Worden, along with his sponsor Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., examines how the decision to “turn on” or “turn off” genes is determined by a highly coordinated series of events that rely on the chemical modification of histone proteins. Misregulation of histone modification can cause a variety of human cancers. Worden plans to study the regulatory mechanisms that control histone methylation, which is important for the formation of leukemias.

Nikhil Panicker

Nikhil Panicker Receives Fellowship for Stem Cell Research

Nikhil Panicker, Ph.D., a post-doctoral fellow in the Neurology Department, has been awarded a fellowship by the Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund (MSCRF). This grant award supports exceptional post-doctoral fellows who wish to conduct research in academia or in industry in Maryland, according to the MSCRF. Panicker will receive $130,000 over two years, which he will use to continue his research on the cell-signaling mechanisms that mediate dopamine-neuron death in Parkinson’s disease.

David Hackam

David Hackam Named Committee Chair by American Pediatric Surgical Association

David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., surgeon-in-chief and co-director of Johns Hopkins Children's Center and professor of surgery, has been named chair of the Research Committee of the American Pediatric Surgical Association, for a term lasting through May 2019. Hackam says his goal, as national committee chair, is to increase the pipeline of surgeon-scientists performing research to benefit children, with a focus on attracting under-represented minorities and women to the field. He also wants to form bridges with high schools and undergrad and medical school programs to advance pediatric surgical research, with the aim of fostering the inclusion of individuals who may never have considered entering the fields of pediatric surgery and pediatric research.

Gerald Hart

Gerald Hart Named President-Elect of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Organization

Gerald W. Hart, Ph.D., Paul and Christine Englund Professor and director of the Department of Biological Chemistry, has been named president-elect of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, an organization with more than 12,000 members. The society promotes scientific and educational journals, organizes an annual meeting, advocates for fundamental discovery research funding, supports science education at all educational levels and promotes diversity in the scientific workforce.

Claire Snyder

Claire Snyder Promoted to Professor of Medicine

A celebration was held in the Welch Library on June 22 to mark the promotion of Claire Snyder, M.H.S., Ph.D., to professor of medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine. Snyder was recruited to Johns Hopkins in 2005. Since that time she has become an international leader in the quality of cancer care, including quality of life for cancer patients and coordination of care between primary care providers and cancer specialists.

Kevin Monk

Kevin Monk Ties for Third Place in Grad Student Poster Session

Kevin Monk, of the neuroscience program, tied for third place for posters presented by graduate students in their third year or greater at the Graduate Student Association Poster Session during GSA Week.

Bin Wu

Bin Wu Named 2017 Pew scholar

Bin Wu, M. Phil., Ph.D., an assistant professor of biophysics and biophysical chemistry, is among 22 early-career researchers named by the Pew Charitable Trusts as 2017 Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences. Each scholar will receive four years of flexible funding to pursue foundational research. Wu says his lab will investigate the role that localized protein synthesis plays in the growth and connection of neurons — work that ultimately could lead to new interventions for conditions such as autism and Alzheimer’s disease, which are associated with a dysregulation of localized protein production.

Travis Babola

Travis Babola Wins First Place Award in Grad Student Poster Session

Travis Babola, a neuroscience student, earned first place for posters presented by graduate students in their third year or greater at the Graduate Student Association Poster Session during GSA Week.

Ted DeWeese

Ted DeWeese Named President-Elect of the American Society for Radiation Oncology

Theodore L. DeWeese, M.D., a vice president for Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Sidney Kimmel Professor and Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, has been named president-elect of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), a prestigious organization with more than 10,000 members who specialize in treating patients with radiation therapies. DeWeese treats men with prostate cancer and is a funded laboratory researcher. He also leads therapeutic and non-therapeutic clinical trials for men with prostate cancer. He is an advisory board member of several prominent cancer centers and the current chair of the ASTRO Science Council.

Suraj Kannan

Suraj Kannan Takes Second Place in Grad Student Poster Presentation

Suraj Kannan, a biomedical engineering student, received second place for posters presented by first- and second-year graduate students at the Graduate Student Association Poster Session during GSA Week.

Andrew Feinberg KUDOS

Andrew Feinberg Recognized with Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), a global, nonprofit organization serving molecular diagnostic professionals, has honored Andrew P. Feinberg, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Center for Epigenetics and Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering and Bloomberg School of Public Health, with its 2017 Award for Excellence in Molecular Diagnostics for his seminal scientific discoveries and countless contributions to the field of epigenetics. The award will be presented Nov. 16 at AMP's annual meeting in Salt Lake City. Following the award presentation, Feinberg will deliver a lecture on the epigenetic basis of common human disease.

Michelle Levine

Michelle Levine Takes Second Place Award in Grad Student Poster Session

Michelle Levine, of the Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, won second place for posters presented by graduate students in their third year or greater at the Graduate Student Association Poster Session during GSA Week.

Hao Zhang

Hao Zhang Receives $25,000 Funding Grant

Hao Zhang, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow with the Department of  Biomedical Engineering, has been selected by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) to receive  a 2017 AAPM Research Seed Funding Grant for his proposal titled “Ultra-Low-Dose Lung Nodule CT Surveillance Using Prior-Image-Based Reconstruction.” As the recipient of this award, he will receive a grant of $25,000 from the AAPM Education & Research Fund. The goal of the funding is to develop investigator-initiated concepts that could lead to successful longer-term project funding from the National Institutes of Health or equivalent funding sources.

Joelle Dorskind

Joelle Dorskind Named Program Representative of the Year

Joelle Dorskind, a member of the Cellular and Molecular Medicine Program, has been named Program Representative of the Year by the Graduate Student Association for her dedication to the GSA and the Cellular and Molecular Medicine program.

Joseph Sakran

Joseph Sakran, a Rising Star

Joseph V. Sakran, M.D., director of Emergency General Surgery at Johns Hopkins Hospital, has been named by Becker's Hospital Review as one of 60 Rising Stars in Healthcare 2017. All honorees are under the age of 40 and, according to Becker's, "have gone above and beyond to achieve greatness in the healthcare field at a young age."

Carol Greider

Adler Archer Given Citizen of the Year Award

Adler Archer, a Ph.D. candidate in health sciences informatics, has been named the Graduate Student Association Executive Board’s choice for Citizen of the Year for his pioneering work in developing a Diversity Council at the School of Medicine.

Chin Siang Ong 2

Chin Siang Ong Takes First Place in Grad Student Poster Presentation

Chin Siang Ong, a member of the Cellular and Molecular Medicine Program, received first place for posters presented by first- and second-year graduate students at the Graduate Student Association Poster Session during GSA Week.

Carol Greider

Carol Greider Receives Alma Dea Morani, M.D., Award

Nobel laureate Carol Greider, Ph.D., Daniel Nathans Professor and director, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, has received a 2017 Alma Dea Morani, M.D., Renaissance Woman Award from the Foundation for the History of Women in Medicine (FHWIM). Greider, who won her Nobel Prize in 2009 for a groundbreaking discovery on what makes cells age, received the Morani award for making a significant mark on history and pivotally advancing the future, according to the FHWIM.

Elliott Haut

Elliot Haut Named to JAMA Surgery's Editorial Board

Elliott Haut, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of surgery, was appointed to the editorial board of JAMA Surgery, effective July 1.

Daniel Pham

Daniel Pham Receives Community Service of the Year Award 
 

Daniel Pham, a Ph.D. candidate in neuroscience, has received the Community Service of the Year Award from the Graduate Student Association for his work on Project Bridge and Brain Fest.

Alex Mims Pike

Alex Mims Pike Named Student Group Leader of the Year

Alex Mims Pike, a member of the Cellular and Molecular Medicine Program, has been named Student Group Leader of the Year by the Graduate Student Association for her work in LIFE (Leadership Initiative for the Environment).

Daniel Hanley

Daniel Hanley Receives Distinguished Investigator Award

Daniel Hanley Jr., M.D., professor of neurology, has received the 2018 ACCM Distinguished Investigator Award on behalf of the American College of Critical Care Medicine. This award is the organization’s highest recognition and is given to an individual whose scientific and educational contributions to the art and science of critical care demonstrates career commitment and excellence. Hanley investigates stroke and brain injury treatment.
 

David Levine

David Levine Receives Award for Sponsoring Women Faculty and Fellows

David Levine, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of medicine in the General Internal Medicine division, and director, Office of Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs, Department of Medicine, has received the Third Annual Sponsorship Award from the Department of Medicine's Task Force on Women’s Academic Careers in Medicine. The award honors Levine's commitment to supporting and advancing women faculty and fellows by acting as a sponsor. A sponsor, according to the task force, is a person in a leadership position who actively supports the career advancement of a more junior faculty member or trainee in whom they see career and leadership potential.

Robert wood

Robert Wood Leads Research Group Getting $42 Million from NIH

The National Institutes of Health plans to award $42.7 million over seven years to the Consortium of Food Allergy Research (CoFAR), led by Robert Wood, M.D., a professor of pediatrics and an internationally recognized expert on food allergy and childhood asthma. The award will allow CoFar to continue evaluating new approaches to treat food allergy. The first year of funding has already been made.

Daniel Chan

Daniel Chan Named Principal Investigator for Proteome Center

Daniel W. Chan, Ph.D., professor of pathology, oncology, radiology and urology and director of the Center for Biomarker Discovery and Translation, has been named contact principal investigator of the recently launched Proteome Characterization Center at Johns Hopkins. The center is sponsored by the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. The goal of the center is to improve the understanding of cancer by evaluating the protein and genetic data within patients' tumor samples. The center is part of the NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium.

Judith Goldstein

Judith Goldstein Chosen as Humanitarian of the Year by Lions District

Judith Goldstein, O.D., associate professor of ophthalmology and rehabilitative medicine and chief of the Low Vision and Vision Rehabilitation Service at the Wilmer Eye Institute, was awarded the 2017 Humanitarian of the Year Award by the Lions Multiple District 22-C. The award acknowledges  Goldstein’s landmark research in vision rehabilitation and her commitment to extending low vision services to a population in need. Through her program-building efforts, she helped establish the Lions Low Vision and Visual Rehabilitation Service at Wilmer as the highest volume low vision center in the United States. She also developed the Johns Hopkins Lions Fellowship Training Program, the first accredited fellowship in low vision for optometrists and ophthalmologists in the country.

Paul Fuchs

Paul Fuchs Selected to Head Auditory System Study Section, Center for Scientific Review

Paul Fuchs, Ph.D., a professor of otolaryngology–head and neck surgery, will serve as chairperson of the National Institutes of Health's Auditory System Study Section, Center for Scientific Review, for the term beginning July 1, 2017, and ending June 30, 2019. Membership on a study section represents an opportunity for participants to contribute to the national biomedical research effort. Members are selected on the basis of their demonstrated competence and achievement in their scientific discipline as evidenced by the quality of research accomplishments, publications in scientific journals and other significant scientific activities, achievements and honors. Service on a study section also requires mature judgment and objectivity as well as the ability to work effectively in a group. The skill and leadership offered by the chairperson determine to a significant extent the effectiveness and efficiency of the review group.

Raz Rabbak

Rab Razzak Wins Educational Program Award

Rab Razzak, M.B.B.S., M.D., an assistant professor of medicine and director of Outpatient Palliative Medicine, has received an Educational  Program Award for the Osler Wellness Program from the School of Medicine's Institute for Excellence in Education. The award recognizes a noteworthy medical or biomedical teaching program that has been implemented for five years or less. Such a program is generally developed and supported by a team of three or more faculty educators, learners and staff, not a sole individual. Programs are judged on their impact on learners, including learner satisfaction, educational outcomes attained and scholarship and recognition.
 

Bowen Jiang

Neurosurgery Resident Bowen Jiang Awarded Fellowship

Bowen Jiang, M.D., a neurosurgery resident, has been awarded an Integra Foundation Socioeconomic Fellowship sponsored by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons/Council of State Neurosurgical Societies (CSNS). The fellowship consists of a one-year period in which Jing will be involved in all aspects of the CSNS. The CSNS is a representative, deliberative and collaborative organization of neurosurgeons in training and practice. Its mission includes influencing and affecting the socioeconomic policy of organized neurosurgery for the benefit of neurosurgical patients and the neurosurgery profession and serving as a resource for socioeconomic knowledge and education for neurosurgical colleagues, regulatory and health care officials as well as legislative representatives.

Heather Sateia

Heather Sateia Earns Lisa J. Heiser Award

Heather Sateia, M.D., associate professor of medicine, has received the Lisa J. Heiser Award for Junior Faculty Contribution in Education by the School of Medicine's Institute for Excellence in Education. The annual award, which accepts only peer nominations, is given to one junior faculty member — on faculty for five years or less — who has made an outstanding contribution in medical/biomedical education and shown great promise for future meaningful contributions.

Leonard Feldman

Leonard Feldman Wins Educational Scholarship Award

Leonard Feldman, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics and director of the Medicine-Pediatrics Urban Health Residency Program, has received an Educational  Scholarship Award from the School of Medicine's Institute for Excellence in Education. The award is designed primarily for a faculty member who has a notable body of educational scholarship work, which can include publications, workshops, other dissemination and contributions to other institutions.

Gordon Tomaselli

Gordon Tomaselli named editor of Journal of Clinical Investigation

Gordon Tomaselli, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Cardiology, was named the next editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Investigation at the American Society for Clinical Investigation/Association of American Physicians' joint meeting in Chicago in April. Tomaselli will serve a five-year term with an editorial board of peer scientists based at Johns Hopkins.

Carol Greider

For Carol Greider, an Outstanding Investigator Award

Carol Greider, Ph.D., Daniel Nathans Professor and Director, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, and professor of molecular biology and genetics, has received an Outstanding Investigator Award (OIA) from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The award was established in 2015 for principal investigators who have achieved significant research accomplishments. It provides funding of up to $600,000 in direct costs per year for seven years, allowing the awarded investigators to continue or begin projects of unusual potential in cancer research. Greider, a Nobel laureate, directs a group of scientists studying both the role of short telomeres in age-related disease and cancer as well as the regulatory mechanism that maintain telomere length.

Kofi Boahene

Kofi Boahene Receives the Maureen Hannley Award for Alternative Science Research

Kofi Boahene, M.D., associate professor, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, was given the award by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery for his "Triological Thesis: Free Functional Transfer of the Omohyoid Muscle Tendon Unit: Flap Dissection, Biomechanical Modeling, Excursion and Potential Application in Facial Paralysis."

Jennifer Elisseeff

Jennifer Elisseeff joins TEDCO board of directors

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan has appointed Jennifer Elisseeff, Ph.D., professor of biomedical engineering, to the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) board of directors. Elisseeff is also the director of the Translational Tissue Engineering Center at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute.  She is the co-founder of Cartilix Inc., a startup that translated adhesive and biomaterial technologies for treating orthopedic disease and which was acquired by Biomet Inc., and Aegeris Soft Tissue, which focuses on soft tissue regeneration and wound healing.

David Levine

David Levine Receives Award for Lifetime Achievement in Medical and Biomedical Education

The School of Medicine's Institute for Excellence in Education has bestowed its highest honor —- the Martin D. Abeloff Award for Lifetime Achievement in Medical and Biomedical Education —- on David Levine, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of medicine in the General Internal Medicine division, and director, Office of Postdoctoral Fellowship Programs, Department of Medicine. He studies community-based prevention of cardiovascular disease and behavioral aspects of prevention.

Deidre Crews

Deidra Crews Inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha

Deidra Crews, a nephrologist and epidemiologist, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology at the School of Medicine and associate vice chair for Diversity and Inclusion in the Department of Medicine, was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society at the School of Medicine's Institute for Excellence in Education conference in March. Election to Alpha Omega Alpha is an honor signifying a physician's lasting commitment to scholarship, leadership, professionalism and service.

Ronald Sherman

Ronald L. Sherman Appointed as Full-Time Faculty

Ronald L. Sherman, D.P.M., has joined Johns Hopkins Medicine as a full-time faculty member in the Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy. A diabetic podiatric surgeon, Sherman focuses on managing the podiatric needs of diabetic patients in the Department of Medicine’s diabetes center and in the Heart & Vascular Institute’s Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot and Wound Center at the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center. Sherman received his doctor of podiatric medicine degree from the New York College of Podiatric Medicine in 1982 and earned his master’s degree in business administration with honors, specializing in health care management, from the University of Baltimore in 2000. He is board-certified in foot and ankle surgery by the American Board of Podiatric Surgery and board-certified in wound care by the Council for Medical Education and Testing.

Ho Lam Tang

Ho Lam Tang Wins Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award

Ho Lam Tang, Ph.D., who was recently appointed an assistant professor of neurosurgery at the School of Medicine (effective August), is one of 12 winners of the Hartwell Foundation’s 2016 Individual Biomedical Research Award competition. The awards, which fund early-stage, innovative and cutting-edge biomedical research to benefit children, provide research support for three years at $100,000 per year. Tang received his award for his work in "Inhibiting Anastasis in Cancer: Overcoming Reversal in the Cell Death Process to Prevent Recurrence." Tang is currently a research associate, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Samuel Alaish

Samuel M. Alaish Wins Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

Samuel M. Alaish, M.D., associate professor of pediatric surgery, Department of Surgery, surgical director of the Center for Intestinal Rehabilitation and Cure Using Science at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and director of Fellowship, Pediatric Surgery, is one of the 12 winners of the Hartwell Foundation’s 2016 Individual Biomedical Research Award competition. The awards, which fund early-stage, innovative and cutting-edge biomedical research to benefit children, provide research support for three years at $100,000 per year. Alaish received his award for his work in “Partitioned Stent to Overcome Infections and Feeding Intolerance in Short Bowel Syndrome.”

Jill Farhner

Jill A. Fahrner Wins Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Award

Jill A. Fahrner, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics within the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, is one of 12 winners of the Hartwell Foundation’s 2016 Individual Biomedical Research Award competition. The awards, which fund early-stage, innovative and cutting-edge biomedical research to benefit children, provide research support for three years at $100,000 per year. Fahrner received her award for her work in “Altering Epigenetics to Treat Growth Abnormalities.”

Jonathan Forsberg

Jonathan A. Forsberg to Receive the Ellis Island Medal of Honor

Jonathan A. Forsberg, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins University and a professor in the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences-Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Department of Surgery, has been selected to receive the 2017 Ellis Island Medal of Honor. Forsberg, who is also a Navy captain, was among 100 individuals chosen from throughout business, government, medicine, art and education, as well as honorees from all branches of the military, whose accomplishments in their fields and service to the nation are “a cause for celebration,” according to the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations (NECO), which sponsors the Medal of Honor.

Elizabeth Jaffee

Elizabeth M. Jaffee to Head Cancer Association

Elizabeth M. Jaffee, M.D., deputy director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center and leader of the Stand Up to Cancer-Lustgarten Foundation Dream Team, has been named president-elect of the American Association for Cancer Research. Jaffee, a professor of oncology at the School of Medicine, is an international leader in the development of immune-based therapies for pancreatic and breast cancers.

Alan Cohen

Alan Cohen’s Newest Textbook Wins First Place Award

Pediatric Neurosurgery: Tricks of the Trade (Thieme, 2016) has won first prize in the Prose Awards given by the Association of American Publishers. The award honors professional and scholarly excellence in the category of textbook in clinical medicine. The book previously won first prize in the British Medical Association Book Awards in the category of specialty books. Alan Cohen, M.D., is director of the Johns Hopkins Division of Pediatric Neurosurgery, professor of neurosurgery, and the Benjamin S. Carson Sr., M.D., and Dr. Evelyn Spiro, R.N., Professor of Pediatric Neurosurgery at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Reza Manesh

Reza Sedighi Manesh Receives Jeremiah A. Barondess Fellowship

Reza Manesh, M.D., assistant professor of medicine, has received the 2017–19 Jeremiah A. Barondess Fellowship in Clinical Transaction, given by the New York Academy of Medicine, in collaboration with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Manesh received the award on March 10 at the 2017 ACGME Annual Educational Conference in Orlando, Florida. The two-year, $50,000 fellowship will support his study of the use of the Human Diagnosis Project as a scalable and objective measure of clinical reasoning.

Jennifer Lawton

Jennifer Lawton Named New Cardiac Surgery Chief

Jennifer Lawton, M.D., has been named the new head of the Johns Hopkins Division of Cardiac Surgery, becoming the first woman to hold the job. Lawton, who specializes in adult cardiac surgery, previously was associate chief of the division. She also is director of the Cardiac Surgery Research Laboratory and director of the cardiothoracic fellowship training program.8899

Daniel O'Connor

Daniel O’Connor Wins Presidential Early Career Award

Daniel O’Connor, Ph.D., assistant professor of neuroscience at the School of Medicine, is among 102 winners of Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers. The awards are the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. O’Connor’s research focuses on neural circuits for sensory perception. His lab is working to reveal the neural circuit foundations of touch perception, and to provide a framework to understand how circuit dysfunction causes mental and behavioral aspects of neuropsychiatric illness.2288