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COVID-19 Update

We continue to monitor COVID-19 cases in our area and providers will notify you if there are scheduling changes. Please continue to call your providers with health concerns. We are providing in-person care and telemedicine appointments.

Learn about our expanded patient care options and visitor guidelines.

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Breast Center

 

Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

We Are Here and Ready to Safely Care for You

At Johns Hopkins Medicine, your health and safety are our very highest priorities. We are ready to care for you and your family in our hospitals, surgery centers, and through in-person clinic and online video visits. Learn how we are keeping you safe and protected so that you can get the care you need.


How We Make Sure You Are Safe

To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, our doctors and care teams are taking extra precautions to make your visit as safe as possible.

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Testing and Screening

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Masks and Protective Equipment

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Cleaning

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Physical Distancing

Learn more about our COVID-19 safety precautions.


How to Schedule Your Appointment

In-Person Visits

If you are an existing patient and had an appointment that was postponed, our offices may contact you to reschedule. You can also call your doctor’s office or send a message via MyChart to discuss your healthcare needs so we can determine the appointment that is most appropriate. If you are a new patient, please contact us to schedule an in-person primary or specialty care visit.
Learn more about in-person visits.

Procedures

If you've been already scheduled for a procedure that had to be postponed, we will reach out to reschedule. If this is a new procedure, please contact us to schedule a consultation.
Learn more about preparing for your appointment.

Video Visits (Telemedicine)

Many new and existing Johns Hopkins patients have the option to have a video appointment (telemedicine) with their provider, depending on their healthcare need. If you don't have a device to use for a video visit, you and your provider may decide that a telephone call will meet your needs.
About video visits

*New patients have not been previously seen by a provider at the Breast Center.
**Existing patients have been seen by the center in the past. Existing patients must have a MyChart account to request an appointment online, or may otherwise need to call. You can enroll in MyChart to manage appointments, communicate with your provider, receive test results and request prescription renewals.

Diagnosis, Treatment and Support

Every year in the United States, close to 260,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer. They are women of all ages and all types: young women, older women, wives, mothers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts, cousins, friends and loved ones. While the types of breast cancers vary almost as much as the women who are diagnosed with them, more is known about breast cancer than ever before.

Our unique program combines a multidisciplinary approach with a large breast cancer survivor support group to best meet the needs of our patients. 

No matter where you are in your journey through this illness, the Johns Hopkins Breast Center offers a comprehensive program with breast cancer specialists who can manage any phase of your disease. 

 
Meet our team
Meet Our Team
Learn about our exceptional physicians, patient-centered approach, and caring team of nurses, staff and survivor-volunteers.
Find a Location
Find a Location
Our breast specialists are located in Baltimore at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins Bayview and Green Spring Station.
Request an Appointment
Request an appointment to meet with a specialist.

Featured Videos

Facebook Live Event: Addressing Facts and Fears in the Face of Breast Cancer

Visit the Breast Cancer Video Gallery

Breast Cancer in Pregnancy | Gina's Story

Gina Lawson was pregnant with her first child when she found a suspicious lump in her breast. After being diagnosed with a rare but aggressive form of breast cancer, she sought a second opinion at Johns Hopkins, where her surgeon, oncologist and OB-GYN teams collaboratively developed a plan to ensure she could promptly begin cancer treatment while simultaneously maintaining a healthy pregnancy.

Exploring Your Breast Surgery Options

Dr. David Euhus, director of breast surgery, discusses the differences between a lumpectomy and a mastectomy, techniques used to maintain the look and shape of the breast following surgery, and the typical recovery process for patients.