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Kristy Dickson, M.P.A.

Kristy Dickson Kristy Dickson

Chief of Staff, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Why did you decide to join Johns Hopkins Medicine?

I did an administrative internship in the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center during graduate school. I knew from that experience that I wanted to return after I graduated. I was fortunate to be hired into the Department of Medicine, where I provided financial management of clinical trials. It was a very powerful experience, especially because of the people I got to work with.

Why have you decided to stay at Johns Hopkins Medicine?

I’m very fortunate to be surrounded by remarkable colleagues and faculty, which is why I have spent my career here. There are also amazing challenges and opportunities, and I’ve always been someone who looks for opportunities to be helpful.

Please tell us about how you reached your leadership position.

I would say it has been a lot of hard work, excellent mentorship and a bit of good luck. I spent three years in my first role and then was hired into the assistant administrator position in neurosurgery and grew my responsibility over 17 years in the department. I’m a problem solver at heart. I will also volunteer to help fix things, even when I’m not the expert. One of the benefits of Hopkins is that people will teach you anything.

Which of your accomplishments are you most proud of at Johns Hopkins Medicine?

In my prior job as the administrator of neurosciences, I helped build an integrated clinical footprint across JHM for our specialties of neurology and neurosurgery. By doing this, we broadened the access of care for our patients. We worked very hard to develop programs and clinics to ensure that people who need to see our specialists can do so.

What advice would you give a woman who is aspiring to grow in her leadership responsibilities?

Grow your responsibility by offering to take on new projects or opportunities that stretch your knowledge. Observe, watch, listen and learn so that you can see what works — and what doesn’t. Find people who challenge you so that you can go outside your comfort zone. If you are not in a job that challenges you, either find opportunities to make it challenging or don’t stay there. It’s also important to meet people where they are. You need to go to them and see what they do, which is always more interesting.

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