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Hematology Labs

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  • Alison Moliterno Lab

    The Alison Moliterno Lab studies the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis and idiopathic myelofibrosis. Our research is focused on the genetic and epigenetic lesions associated with MPDs, with the goal of improving diagnosis and treatment for these disorders.

    Research Areas: blood disorders, idiopathic myelofibrosis, essential thrombocytosis, epigenetics, genomics, polycythemia vera, myeloproliferative disorders

    Principal Investigator

    Alison Moliterno, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Carlton Haywood Lab

    The Carlton Haywood Lab studies sickle cell disease, with a focus on the issue of trust among sickle cell patients. Additional research studies the articulation of African-American perspectives in bioethics.

    Research Areas: sickle cell diseases, African Americans, bioethics

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Carlton Haywood

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jennifer Hayashi Lab

    Research in the Jennifer Hayashi Lab is focused on educational research related to teaching home care for doctors and interdisciplinary teams. Recently, we created a four-step process preparing a residency program for an anticipated short-term weather emergency.

    Research Areas: medical education, gerontology, in-home care

    Principal Investigator

    Jennifer Hayashi

    Department

    Medicine

  • Jerry Spivak Lab

    Research in the Jerry Spivak Lab focuses on chronic myeloproliferative disorders, particularly their molecular mechanisms and methods for distinguishing them diagnostically and interventionally. By analyzing gene expression in polycythemia vera stem cells, we have learned that patients with polycythemia vera can be differentiated from those with erythrocytosis and can be diagnosed as having either aggressive or slow-growing disease. We are also studying the roles played by specific molecular markers in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of polycythemia vera.

    Research Areas: stem cells, pathogenesis, polycythemia vera, myeloproliferative disorders

    Principal Investigator

    Jerry Spivak, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Linda Smith-Resar Lab

    The Linda Smith-Resar Lab primarily investigates hematologic malignancy and molecular mechanisms that lead to cancer as well as sickle cell anemia. Recent studies suggest that education is an important and effective component of a patient blood management program and that computerized provider order entry algorithms may serve to maintain compliance with evidence-based transfusion guidelines. Another recent study indicated that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to colorectal cancer, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention.

    Research Areas: blood disorders, sickle cell diseases, blood management programs, hematologic malignancies

    Lab Website

    Principal Investigator

    Linda Smith-Resar, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Michael B. Streiff Lab

    The Michael B. Streiff Lab conducts clinical and laboratory research of thrombophilia associated with malignancy. We are interested in the application of novel coagulation assays to explore the pathogenesis of thrombosis and the development of strategies to enhance the clinical management of anti-thrombotic agents.

    Research Areas: cancer, thrombophilia

    Principal Investigator

    Michael Streiff, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Rakhi Naik Lab

    The Rakhi Naik Lab studies sickle cell disease. We focus on complications related to the disease, including chronic kidney disease and venous thromboembolism. By defining the risks and factors for diseases related to the sickle cell trait, we hope to improve genetic counseling and screening and treatment recommendations. Other research in the lab examines the epidemiology and unique mechanisms of thrombosis in patients with hemoglobin disorders. Specifically, we are trying to identify mechanisms of hypercoagulability and develop treatments for patients with hemoglobinopathies.

    Research Areas: epidemiology, sickle cell diseases, kidney diseases, venous thromboembolism, hemoglobin disorders, genetic counseling

    Principal Investigator

    Rakhi Naik, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Robert Brodsky Lab

    Investigators in the Robert Brodsky Lab study normal and abnormal hematopoiesis, particularly mutations of the phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis class A (PIG-A) gene in aplastic anemia. Our team has developed a new diagnostic assay for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) that is based on the toxin Aaeromonas hydrophila.

    Research Areas: high-dose cyclophosphamide, hematopoiesis, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, aplastic anemia

    Principal Investigator

    Robert Brodsky, M.D.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Satish Shanbhag Lab

    Research interests in the Satish Shanbhag Lab include lymphoid malignancies, particularly low-grade lymphomas, cutaneous T cell lymphoma and mycosis fungoides.

    Research Areas: low-grade lymphomas, lymphoid malignancies, mycosis fungoides, cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    Principal Investigator

    Satish Shanbhag, M.B.B.S., M.P.H.

    Department

    Medicine

  • Sophie Lanzkron Lab

    Work in the Sophie Lanzkron Lab is focused on understanding the barriers to care for adults with sickle cell disease. Our research has shown that despite the approval of hydroxyurea treatment predicted to decrease hospitalizations for sickle cell disease patients' the cost of care has increased significantly in recent years. Research is ongoing to identify the factors that limit access to care for this population.

    Research Areas: sickle cell diseases, patient-centered health care, hydroxyurea, health services research

    Principal Investigator

    Sophie Lanzkron, M.D., M.H.S.

    Department

    Medicine

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