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Lions Vision Rehabilitation Fellowship

A formal program for post-doctoral fellowship training in vision rehabilitation related clinical science and research is offered at The Wilmer Eye Institute. The Accredited Subspecialty Training Program (ASTP) “Fellowship” in Vision Rehabilitation is for a one–year clinical fellowship.

Application deadline: Friday, January 24, 2014

All applications are submitted directly to the Wilmer Eye Institute. This Advanced Specialty Training Program in Vision Rehabilitation is accredited by the Graduate Medical Education Committee at the Johns Hopkins University. This fellowship is not part of the Optometry or Ophthalmology Matching Services.

Interview days:

Thursday, February 6, 2014
Thursday, February 20, 2014

Only applicants with completed files will be given interview consideration.

1. Introduction

This outline is intended to provide an overview of the Lions Vision Rehabilitation Advanced Specialty Training (“Fellowship”) Program at the Wilmer Eye Institute (Department of Ophthalmology) of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The Lions Vision Center has three Optometrists, two Occupational Therapists and one Rehabilitation Therapist providing low vision care within an eye department of 60 full time faculty. The Vision Rehabilitation Research Center has 3 full-time research faculty.

2. Program Description

Eligible candidates are ophthalmologists and optometrists who have a strong interest in vision rehabilitation and have a solid foundation in basic clinical skills, including diagnosis and management of primary eye care disorders. The training program is under the direction of Dr. Judith E. Goldstein, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Rehabilitative Medicine, and emphasizes the interdisciplinary team approach to patient care. A full range of lectures, seminars and conferences at the Wilmer Eye Institute is available to the fellow, along with low vision-specific clinical and research seminars. The fellow will be expected to participate in community awareness programs and is encouraged to complete a clinical research project during the fellowship year. The clinical fellowship program is one year, beginning July 1. The goal of the fellowship program is to train ophthalmologists and optometrists to become experts in clinical vision rehabilitation.

3. Training Program

The training program is designed to provide the fellow with training in advanced clinical low vision rehabilitation and experience with vision rehabilitation research. For the initial 3-6 weeks of the program (depending on prior clinical care experience), the fellow will only observe patient care. Emphasis will be placed on the model and patient flow of rehabilitative care, including the clinical evaluation with optometrist or ophthalmologist and subsequent assessment and treatment by an occupational or rehabilitation CLVT (certified low vision therapist). By enabling observation only, during this initial portion of the program, the fellow is provided time to externally evaluate multiple rehabilitation interventions and multi-disciplinary treatment approaches. Additionally, this protected time allows the Fellow to develop a clinical research project for the year. The overall split in effort within the one-year fellowship is 80% clinical and 20% research.

After the initial clinical observation period, the fellow will be expected to independently evaluate and diagnose new patients, present to faculty member and develop a treatment plan for conditions that range from near-normal visual impairment to total impairment with a comprehensive range of functional deficits and co-morbidities.

Over 1300 rehabilitative visits per year at JHU alone of which approximately over 70% are consultations from ophthalmologists and retinal specialists locally, nationally and internationally are currently managed. The range of rehabilitative care required is from congenital to acquired conditions and of multiple ocular and systemic etiologies. Coordination within the ophthalmology division as well as University and Hospital components of Hopkins are another key element in the role of total rehabilitation care. Inpatient and outpatient care both are represented in the patient population. The fellow will participate in follow up of treated cases to understand what outcomes to anticipate when different approaches are undertaken.

Level of independence increases throughout the training program, from observation only to direct care, from straightforward refractive cases to complex visual problems, with neurological co–morbidities. At the end of the year, we expect that each graduate will achieve the following goals: (1) Be proficient in the clinical delivery of low vision rehabilitation care in a multi-disciplinary setting, (2) Diagnose, treat, manage and direct the care of the low vision patient with consideration applied to co-morbidities, psycho-social concerns, and the key roles of each of the rehab team members, (3) Complete a research project and publish in peer-reviewed journal.

4. Structure of Training Program

Fellows will primarily work out of the main Hopkins campus and may obtain exposure and observe vision rehabilitation care at other local facilities. After the initial orientation and observation period, Fellows schedule will generally comprise 4 clinic days and 1 research day per week.

With the goal of creating clinician-scientists, a clinical research project is anticipated from the Fellow during the year. The proposed project will be presented and reviewed by the research team for approval. Various clinical research projects are ongoing in the areas of mobility, rehabilitation outcomes, and models of multidisciplinary care. The fellow can choose a project independent of the existing research projects. One published paper is expected from the one-year fellowship.

5. Clinical Program Faculty

Judith E. Goldstein, O.D., F.A.A.O.

Dr. Goldstein is Chief of Low Vision Clinical Services and directs clinical and teaching activities at the Center, provides low vision rehabilitative care to patients, and participates in clinical research. A graduate of the State University of New York at Binghamton, Dr. Goldstein earned her doctorate in Optometry at the State University of New York College of Optometry in 1993 and completed her residency at the Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center in conjunction with Wilmer Eye Institute at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. Specially trained in low vision care and ocular diseases, Dr. Goldstein provided low vision care to patients at her private clinical practice for over a decade while directing the Low Vision Service at University of Maryland. A Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry, Dr. Goldstein has lectured on the identification and treatment of retinal disorders at national and international conferences. Dr. Goldstein joined Wilmer Eye Institute in 2006 to lead the clinical care and teaching program, and in 2008, developed the Johns Hopkins accredited Lions Fellowship Training Program. Her current major research activities include the development and management of a 30-site research network to perform ongoing clinical trials in vision rehabilitation.

Robert Massof, Ph.D.

Dr. Massof is Professor of Ophthalmology and Professor of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is founder and Director of the Lions Vision Research and Rehabilitation Center, a division of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute. Dr. Massof received his Ph.D. in Physiological Optics from Indiana University in 1975. Dr. Massof’s research areas include health outcomes measurements, clinical and basic vision psychophysics, physiological optics, and psychometrics. His work has been supported by grants from the National Eye Institute, the National Institute on Aging, the National Science Foundation, NASA, the VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, the Multiple District 22 Lions Vision Research Foundation, and several different corporations and private foundations. Dr. Massof is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and has served on the Society's Board of Directors. He also is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry and the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He has authored more than 160 published scientific papers and book chapters, edited a book on low vision policy and service delivery issues, and holds five patents and three software copyrights on instruments that he developed. Dr. Massof founded and directed a collaboration of The Johns Hopkins University, NASA, and the VA to develop the Low Vision Enhancement System, called "LVES" ("Elvis"). This work was recognized with numerous awards, including the Popular Mechanics Design and Engineering Award and the NASA Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer. Among Dr. Massof's other awards for his low vision research are the Alfred W. Bressler Prize in Vision Science from the Jewish Guild for the Blind, the Pisart Vision Award from Lighthouse International, the American Academy of Optometry’s William Feinbloom Award, the Alcon Research Institute Award, and the Research to Prevent Blindness Senior Scientific Investigator Award.Professor of Ophthalmology and Professor of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is founder and Director of the Lions Vision Research and Rehabilitation Center, a division of the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute. Dr. Massof received his Ph.D. in Physiological Optics from Indiana University in 1975. Dr. Massof’s research areas include health outcomes measurements, clinical and basic vision psychophysics, physiological optics, and psychometrics. His work has been supported by grants from the National Eye Institute, the National Institute on Aging, the National Science Foundation, NASA, the VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, the Multiple District 22 Lions Vision Research Foundation, and several different corporations and private foundations. Dr. Massof is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and has served on the Society's Board of Directors. He also is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry and the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He has authored more than 160 published scientific papers and book chapters, edited a book on low vision policy and service delivery issues, and holds five patents and three software copyrights on instruments that he developed. Dr. Massof founded and directed a collaboration of The Johns Hopkins University, NASA, and the VA to develop the Low Vision Enhancement System, called "LVES" ("Elvis"). This work was recognized with numerous awards, including the Popular Mechanics Design and Engineering Award and the NASA Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer. Among Dr. Massof's other awards for his low vision research are the Alfred W. Bressler Prize in Vision Science from the Jewish Guild for the Blind, the Pisart Vision Award from Lighthouse International, the American Academy of Optometry’s William Feinbloom Award, the Alcon Research Institute Award, and the Research to Prevent Blindness Senior Scientific Investigator Award.

Alexis Malkin, O.D.

Dr. Malkin is a graduate of Emory University and completed her optometry training at New England College of Optometry, where she graduated salutatorian. She completed her residency at the Northport VA Hospital with a focus in primary care optometry, low vision rehabilitation and vision therapy. Dr. Malkin then completed the Lions Vision Rehabilitation Fellowship at Johns Hopkins in 2010. Dr. Malkin is involved in private practice low vision as well as continuing her work at Wilmer. She is particularly interested in clinical research including better understanding quality of life outcome measures. Dr. Malkin sees patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Tiffany L. Chan, O.D.

Dr. Chan specializes in visual function and rehabilitation to optimize the remaining sight of patients with chronic visual impairment. She received her undergraduate training at the University of California, Davis and her O.D. degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Optometry. Dr. Chan completed her residency at the Northport Veterans Affairs Medical Center in New York with a focus in primary care optometry, low vision rehabilitation and vision therapy. She then completed the Lions Vision Rehabilitation Fellowship at Wilmer Eye Institute. During her training, Dr. Chan received the Corrine Engwall Award for Clinical Excellence in Infant/Toddler Clinic, the Bernhardt N. Thal, OS, VSP Excellence in Primary Care Award and The Louise L. Sloan Research Grant Award for her work in the comparison of physician estimates of rehabilitation potential to low vision rehabilitation outcomes.

James T. Deremeik, RT, CLVT

James Deremeik is the Education/Rehabilitation Program Manager and since 1994, has been a faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, collaborating on research projects, teaching professionals low vision rehabilitation, and providing low vision rehabilitation care. With over 30 years experience in the area of low vision education and rehabilitation, Mr. Deremeik has established successful low vision programs for children at the Arkansas School for the Blind and the Maryland School for the Blind and helped create a low vision rehabilitation program for an adult population that resulted in the Richard Hoover Services for Low Vision and Blindness. Mr. Deremeik has published and lectured on a variety of subjects in the education and rehabilitation area of low vision and maintains an active interest in issues impacting the field of low vision rehabilitation.

5. Vacations

Fellows have up two non-consecutive weeks of vacation (10 working days). This vacation time includes any time away from Wilmer, including job interviews, taking board examinations, or attending (but not presenting) at a national meeting. In addition, the training program physician may take additional time off if presenting at a national meeting (up to 5 additional days). Vacations must be arranged and approved at least 3 months in advance with the faculty to ensure adequate coverage for clinical services.

6. Salary and Fringe Benefits

The salary is based on NIH PGY guidelines. Starting program salary for PGY-1 in 2011 was $39,264 and PGY-2 was $41,364, plus fringe benefits. This may change with each year, but has always been competitive with the rest of the country. In addition, the training program physician receives individual health and malpractice insurance. The training program physician is given a stipend of $1000 each year to be spent on meeting attendance expenses incurred during the training program. In addition, the training program physician is given office space with access to computer facilities, e-mail, and lab coats (with free laundry) for the duration of the training program.

7. Education

As part of an appointment to the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the training program physicians participate in the education of Wilmer Residents for approximately for three hours every six months. The Residents are generally excellent, enthusiastic, and an asset to the training program. In addition, the fellow may participate in many of the CME courses at Wilmer and Johns Hopkins including weekly grand rounds and journal club.

7. Application Process

Application

  1. Completed application form. Please complete all items on biographical form; do not use “see CV” for your answer.
  2. Most recent Curriculum Vitae
  3. Personal statement/letter of intent
  4. Three (3) letters of recommendation from clinical mentors or experienced colleagues
  5. Copies of optometry school transcripts and NBEO scores (if applicable)

Each recommendation letter should be submitted in a sealed envelope along with the application.

Applications can be mailed to:

Dr. Judith E. Goldstein
c/o Keisha Poole
Lions Low Vision Research and Rehabilitation Center
Wilmer Eye Institute
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
600 N. Wolfe Street, Wilmer 105
Baltimore, MD 21287

8. Prerequisites for International Medical Graduates:

  1. Completion of an Ophthalmology Residency
  2. Successful completion of the ECFMG examinations and award of the certificate
  3. USMLE step 3
  4. Must be eligible for J-1 ECFMG visa sponsorship for entire two-year period of fellowship

> Visit the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates Web site

> Visit the Office of International Student, Faculty, and Staff Services Web site

Thank you for your interest in the program. For further inquiries, please contact Keisha Poole at kharri50@jhmi.edu or Dr. Judith Goldstein at jgolds28@jhmi.edu.


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