Print This Page
Share this page: More
 

Anatomy Memorial Garden

Medical student group plans to honor generations of donors

by Shannon Williams | July 25, 2016

anatomy garden

School of Medicine student group plans to turn a small green space west of the Armstrong Medical Education Building into an Anatomy Memorial Garden to honor generations who have donated their bodies to education.

Human Anatomy is the first class for our medical students, and for many, their first time working with a cadaver. Over the rigorous seven-week course, students soon realize that these are not anonymous bodies, but individuals.
 
“We know the smile lines next to their eyes, the palms of their hands, the soles of their feet; we hold their hearts and peek into their brain,” said Anna Goddu, Class of 2019.  
 
Goddu is a member of Humanistic Anatomy, a student group with plans to turn a small green space west of the Armstrong Medical Education Building into an Anatomy Memorial Garden.
 
During their first year of medical school, Goddu, Marina Horiates, and Jia Ahmad, proposed the Anatomy Memorial Garden to celebrate the generations of donors whose bodies are used in the Human Anatomy course.
 
“It was a time of wonder and joy and sadness and amazement, sometimes quiet, sometimes overwhelming, but it was a truly awe-invoking two months,” said Goddu as she described her Anatomy course.   
 
Typically, the students honor the donors in a service at the end of the course, but Goddu and her classmates wanted something more permanent. 
 
“We imagine that the creation of this serene space will fortify a culture of spiritual and emotional wellness for students, staff and patients,” Goddu said.
 
Support is expressed from faculty, staff and students for this project, including the Human Anatomy Course director, the Colleges Advisory Program, and the Medical Student Senate. The group is fundraising this summer with the goal to build the garden in the fall. 
 
If you wish to make a donation to support the memorial garden, please send your gift to the Fund for Johns Hopkins Medicine, care of Steve Rum, or email jhmalumni@jhmi.edu for more information.