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Kaminski, Barbara J., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Main Office Address

Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center
Behavioral Biology Research Center, ste. 3000

4940 Eastern Avenue
Baltimore, MD 21224

Phone: 410-550-2800
Fax: 410-550-2780

 E-mail: bkamins1@jhmi.edu

Administrative Assistant

Michelle Woodland-Evans
E-mail: mwoodla1@jhmi.edu


Education

1985

B.A.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

1987

M.A.

West Virginia University

1990

Ph.D.

West Virginia University

1990-1992

Postdoctoral Research Fellowship

Johns Hopkins University

Professional Interests

My professional interests are in the behavioral mechanisms involved in alcohol and drug use and abuse. This involves investigating, in the laboratory, environmental and behavioral conditions under which use occurs, including conditions under which use/abuse/relapse is less likely. The goal is to both provide information about mechanisms of abuse and to suggest promising strategies for intervention and treatment.  Currently, I am investigating the behavioral mechanisms involved in the concurrent use of alcohol and nicotine, including exploring the effects of the “cost” of access to one on the consumption of the other, using a behavioral economic approach.
 
Selected Publications

Kaminski, BJ, Sannerud, CA, Weerts, EW, Lamb, RJ, & Griffiths, RR.  (2003).  Physical dependence in baboons chronically treated with low and high doses of diazepam.  Behavioral Pharmacology, 14, 331-342. 

Kaminski, BJ & Ator, NA.  (2001).  Behavioral and pharmacological variables affecting risky choice in rats.  Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 75, 275-297. 

Ator, NA, Weerts, EW, Kaminski, BJ, Kautz, MA, & Griffiths, RR.  (2000).  Zaleplon and triazolam physical dependence assessed across increasing doses under a once-daily dosing regimen in baboons.  Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 61, 69-84. 

Weerts, EW, Kaminski, BJ, & Griffiths, RR.  (1998).  Stable low-rate midazolam self-injecion with concurrent physical dependence under conditions of long-term continuous availability in baboons.  Psychopharmacology, 135, 70-81. 

Kaminski, BJ, Sannerud, CA, & Griffiths, RR.  (1996).  Intravenous self-injection of stimulant-anorectics in the baboon.  Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 4, 141-150.

 

 
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