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Faculty Books List by Subject Category (A - H)

ANXIETY DISORDERS

Getting Old without Getting Anxious


Getting Old Without
Getting Anxious

Rabins, Peter V., M.D., M.P.H., and Lynn Lauber
2006

Getting Old Without Getting Anxious assists older people and their caregivers in overcoming one of the more crippling and misunderstood human afflictions: anxiety. Geriatric psychiatrist and co-author of The 36-Hour Day, Dr. Rabins explains that the many changes that occur as a person ages can trigger anxiety. Stories from patients encourage and motivate both those suffering from anxiety and their caregivers.

BIPOLAR DISORDER

An Unquiet Mind

An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness
Jamison, Kay Redfield, Ph.D.  1995

As a co-author of a standard text on mood disorders, Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison is an authority on manic-depressive illness. She is also one of its survivors.  And it is this dual perspective — as healer and healed — that makes her memoir so learned and affecting.

Even as she was pursuing her psychology training, Dr. Jamison found herself succumbing to the exhilarating highs and paralyzing lows that afflicted many of her patients. Though the disorder brought her seemingly boundless energy and creativity, it also propelled her into spending sprees, episodes of violence, and an attempt at suicide.

Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar Disorder

Mondimore, Francis Mark, M.D.  2006

This, the second edition of Bipolar Disorder, is thoroughly updated and discusses promising new options for diagnosis and treatment along with new information on the disease's genetic components.

Bipolar disorder can be difficult to diagnose. Dr. Mondimore explains how symptoms fluctuate in persons with seasonal affective disorder, how they can lead to a mistaken diagnosis of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder in children, and how they may be made worse by alcohol or drug addiction.

The disease can also be difficult to treat. Dr. Mondimore gives advice about how to pick a psychiatrist and cope with the stigma of psychiatric diagnosis. He provides extensive information on treatment options, including the advantages, disadvantages, and side effects of various drug therapies. He also describes what it is like to live with bipolar disorder and discusses how lifestyle changes can improve the quality of life. 

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY

Adolescent Depression
Adolescent Depression
Mondimore, Francis Mark, M.D.  2002


Until recently, many psychiatrists and psychologists believed that adolescents did not experience depression in the way that adults do. Clinicians now realize that young people can and do get seriously depressed, and that depression and bipolar disorder may be more difficult to treat in adolescents than in adults. Depression may also be harder to recognize as an illness, both because moodiness is considered universal among teenagers and because parents often resist having their child treated for a psychiatric illness that they think - and often hope - will be "just a phase."

In this book Dr. Mondimore helps parents understand that serious depression in adolescents is an illness that can be effectively treated. He describes the many forms of depression and the many ways it can appear in young people from intensely sad feelings to irritability, anger, and destructive rages. And he answers parents' questions, including: What are the danger signals of serious depression in teenagers? How are mood disorders diagnosed? How do medications work? What about talking therapies? How does depression relate to other problems, such as drug abuse, ADHD, and eating disorders and other self-injurious behavior?


Developmental Neuropsychiatry
Developmental Neuropsychiatry:
Volume I: Fundamentals

Harris, James, M.D.  1998

Although developmental concepts have held a prominent place in American psychiatry for over fifty years because of the dominance of psychodynamic theory, it is only in recent years that advances in neuroscience have begun to affect developmental psychiatry. James Harris's two-volume work on developmental neuropsychiatry sets the agenda for this emerging clinical specialty.
 
In Volume I, Part I discusses basic neural science, including aspects of molecular neurobiology, developmental neuroanatomy, neurotransmitter systems and neuronal signaling mechanisms, sleep and circadian rhythms, and basic genetics. Part II provides background on cognitive neuroscience that relate to attention, emotion, language, memory, neural networks, and consciousness. Part III emphasizes the developmental perspective which is crucial to an understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders. It offers an ethological framework as well as background information on cognitive development, emotion expression and regulation, language development, temperament and personality, and the emergence of the self.
 


Developmental Neuropsychiatry 2Developmental Neuropsychiatry:
Volume II: Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Developmental Disorders

Harris, James, M.D.  1998

In Volume II, Dr. Harris provides a comprehensive review of the developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. Throughout the text current DSM-IV diagnostic criteria are provided. Part I outlines the diagnostic process and the genetic history, provides details on the conduct of neuropsychological testing, and offers a detailed review of brain imaging techniques, moving from CT and MRI scanning to the most recent developments in functional MRI and PET scanning. Part II discusses mental retardation, cerebral palsy, the learning disorders, the pervasive developmental disorders, and traumatic brain injury. Part III describes behavioral phenotypes in cytogenetic and other genetic disorders, genetic metabolic disorders, and disorders that result from gestational substance abuse. Part IV is devoted to developmental psychopathology and includes attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Tourette's disorder, sleep disorders, and the syndromes of aggression and self-injury primarily occurring in mentally retarded persons. Part V covers treatment and includes detailed descriptions of psychotherapy, behavior therapy, pharmacological interventions, genetic counseling, and gene therapy. Finally, Part VI deals with legal and ethical issues as they pertain to developmentally disabled persons.


Jeopardy in the Courtroom
Jeopardy in the Courtroom: A Scientific Analysis of Children's Testimony

Bruck, Maggie, Ph.D, and Stephen Ceci, Ph.D.  1999

The credibility of children's testimony is a hotly debated topic in America's courtrooms, universities, and professional organizations. Are children more suggestible than adults, and if so, what are the implications for those who work with child witnesses? Using rigorous techniques of analysis, the authors examine real-life cases in which children were key witnesses in criminal child abuse trials. This book is intended as a guide for expert witnesses and all those who work with child witnesses, including psychotherapists, social workers, law-enforcement personnel, and lawyers.

DEPRESSION
Adolescent Depression

Adolescent Depression
Mondimore, Francis Mark, M.D.  2002

Until recently, many psychiatrists and psychologists believed that adolescents did not experience depression in the way that adults do. Clinicians now realize that young people can and do get seriously depressed, and that depression and bipolar disorder may be more difficult to treat in adolescents than in adults. Depression may also be harder to recognize as an illness, both because moodiness is considered universal among teenagers and because parents often resist having their child treated for a psychiatric illness that they think - and often hope - will be "just a phase."In this book Dr. Mondimore helps parents understand that serious depression in adolescents is an illness that can be effectively treated. He describes the many forms of depression and the many ways it can appear in young people from intensely sad feelings to irritability, anger, and destructive rages. And he answers parents' questions, including: What are the danger signals of serious depression in teenagers? How are mood disorders diagnosed? How do medications work? What about talking therapies? How does depression relate to other problems, such as drug abuse, ADHD, and eating disorders and other self-injurious behavior?

Depression: The Mood Disease
Depression, the Mood Disease,
Third Edition
Mondimore, Francis Mark, M.D.  2006

In the third edition of this well-received book Dr. Francis Mark Mondimore explains depression—its causes, symptoms, and treatments. He discusses depression in all age groups and in both sexes, as well as bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorders, and depression that accompanies certain medical illnesses. This edition encompasses more than a decade of new research, advances in pharmacology, and changes in public perception. The past ten years have seen the release of new forms of the major antidepressants as well as other promising new avenues in pharmaceutical treatments. For example "second generation" antidepressants, such as venlafaxine and duloxetine, provide new ways of altering the chemical systems in the brain concerned with mood. And there have been significant advances in the use of monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, now available in patch form. Dr. Mondimore reviews these and other pharmacological therapies as part of a comprehensive approach to treatment that includes psychotherapy, family and community support, and lifestyle changes.

Pain and Depression
Pain and Depression: An Interdisciplinary
Patient-Centered Approach  

Clark, Michael R., M.D., and Glenn J. Treisman, M.D., Ph.D., (Editors)  2004

Pain and depression are very common complaints and often occur together. This book discusses the relationship between chronic pain and depression, and how best to treat them when they occur together. The topics covered include the use of opioids in chronic pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and psychological well-being in the face of pain. This book is intended both for researchers investigating chronic nonmalignant pain and for physicians dealing with patients suffering from chronic pain.

Understanding Depression
Understanding Depression: What We Know and
What You Can Do About It 

DePaulo, J. Raymond, Jr., M.D., and Leslie Alan Horowitz  2003

This book, written by the Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins, is a practical guide for individuals with depression and their families.  Dr. DePaulo discusses how to identify the problem, then directs readers to the various forms of treatment, including medications, psychotherapy, support groups, and exercise.  Understanding Depression reviews the many ways that depression can appear, and also the devastation that it can have on patients, families and loved ones, and the economy. The book also describes in depth manic depression, the bipolar form of depression,  and discusses both mainstream and alternative treatments. 

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EATING DISORDERS AND OBESITY

Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders
Mehler, Philip S., M.D., and Arnold E. Andersen,M.D.
(Editors) 2000

In this guide for pediatricians, internists, and family physicians, the authors discuss the care of patients with eating disorders.  Each chapter poses and answers a series of questions, and uses clinical vignettes where appropriate.  Topics discussed in early chapters include: team treatment, medical evaluation of the patient, principles of diagnosis and treatment, and nutritional rehabilitation. Subsequent chapters address potential complications, organized by organ system: gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, gynecological, endocrinological, and oral and dental. The final chapters are concerned with special issues, such as athletes with eating disorders, obesity, medical tests, and health concerns for non-physicians.

 

ETHICS / PHILOSOPHY
Personal IdentityPersonal Identity and Fractured Selves
Perspectives from Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience
Debra J. H. Mathews, Ph.D., M.A., Hilary Bok, Ph.D., and Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H. (Editors)

This book brings together some of the best minds in neurology and philosophy to discuss the concept of personal identity and the moral dimensions of treating brain disease and injury. The contributors engage a crucial question: When an individual's personality changes radically because of disease or injury, should this changed individual be treated as the same person?

Rapid advances in brain science are expanding knowledge of human memory, emotion, and cognition and pointing the way toward new approaches for the prevention and treatment of devastating illnesses and disabilities. Through case studies of Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, deep brain stimulation, and steroid psychosis, the contributors highlight relevant ethical and social concerns that clinicians, researchers, and ethicists are likely to encounter.

Personal Identity and Fractured Selves represents the first formal collaboration between the Brain Sciences Institute and the Berman Institute of Bioethics, both at the Johns Hopkins University. The book asks neuroscientists and philosophers to address important questions on the topic of personal identity in an effort to engage both fields in fruitful conversation.
FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY

Jeopardy in the Courtroom
Jeopardy in the Courtroom: A Scientific Analysis of Children's Testimony

Bruck, Maggie, Ph.D., and Stephen Ceci, Ph.D. 1999

The credibility of children's testimony is a hotly debated topic in America's courtrooms, universities, and professional organizations. Are children more suggestible than adults, and if so, what are the implications for those who work with child witnesses? Using rigorous techniques of analysis, the authors examine real-life cases in which children were key witnesses in criminal child abuse trials. This book is intended as a guide for expert witnesses and all those who work with child witnesses, including psychotherapists, social workers, law-enforcement personnel, and lawyers.

 

FOR NON-PSYCHIATRIC HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

Cigarettes, Nicotine and Health
Cigarettes, Nicotine, and Health:
A Biobehavioral Approach
Brigham, Janet, Jack Henningfield and Lynn T. Kozlowski   2001

When smokers inhale smoke into their lungs, they take the drug nicotine into their bodies and brains, where it affects how the smokers feel and act.  And when smokers smoke, they put themselves at risk, often knowingly, of early disability or death. Smoking is one of the world’s most pressing public health problems. Cigarettes, Nicotine, and Health reviews the problems caused by smoking and examines individual and public health approaches to reducing smoking and its attendant health problems.


Eating Disorder
Eating Disorders

Mehler, Philip S., M.D., and Arnold E. Andersen, M.D., 
(Editors) 2000

In this guide for pediatricians, internists, and family physicians, the authors discuss the care of patients with eating disorders.  Each chapter poses and answers a series of questions, and uses clinical vignettes where appropriate.  Topics discussed in early chapters include: team treatment, medical evaluation of the patient, principles of diagnosis and treatment, and nutritional rehabilitation. Subsequent chapters address potential complications, organized by organ system: gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, gynecological, endocrinological, and oral and dental. The final chapters are concerned with special issues, such as athletes with eating disorders, obesity, medical tests, and health concerns for nonphysicians.

Health and Treatment Strategies in Obesity
Vaidya, Varsha (Editor)
Advances in Psychosomatic Medicine Vol. 27, Basel,: S. Karger AG 2006

This update on the treatment strategies for obesity provides a balanced appraisal of various options. It contains practical information for physicians who wish to advise patients about reducing their weight. Chapter topics include: recent advances in obesity research; current nutritional treatments of obesity; pharmocologic treatments, bariatric surgery, body contouring, psychosocial aspects of obesity, and cognitive behavior therapy of binge eating disorder.


Mental Health and Productivity
Mental Health and Productivity in the Workplace

Second Edition
Kahn, JP, and Alan M. Langlieb, M.D., MBA, (Editors) 2002

Mental Health and Productivity in the Workplace is a comprehensive and practical guide to identifying, understanding, preventing, and resolving individual and organizational mental health problems in the workplace. Originally published as Mental Health in the Workplace (Van Nostrand/Wiley, 1993), this revised, updated, and expanded edition represents the most current thinking in the field and contains contributions from an expert panel of organizational and occupational psychiatrists.  This new edition adds essential material on creating systems and cultures that encourage organizational productivity and employee mental health, and on finding cost-effective, quality mental health care. The book focuses on problems that start "at the top" (executive dysfunction) as well as on the effects of organizational structure, office politics, chronic change, downsizing and employment uncertainty, office wide emotional crises, and aspects of organizational development. In addition, it includes information about such basic issues as anxiety, stress, burnout, depression, drug and alcohol abuse, violence, and psychosis.

Motivating Change
Motivating Behavior Change Among Illicit-Drug Abusers: Research on Contingency Management Interventions

Higgins, ST, Ph.D., and Kenneth Silverman Ph.D., (Editors)  1999

Overcoming drug addiction requires great personal motivation on the part of the addict: the drug abuser must want to break the habit before change can occur. Contingency management interventions represent one of the most effective ways to enhance motivation among substance abusers. This book describes the use of contingency management with individuals addicted to cocaine, heroin, and other illicit-drugs.

Contingency management is a scientifically based process of providing incentives for abstaining from drug abuse. Techniques involved in this treatment include positive reinforcement for drug abstinence. Motivating Behavior Change Among Illicit Drug Abusers reviews literature describing the use of contingency management techniques with a wide range of individuals, including pregnant women, homeless people, and drug abusers with schizophrenia. This comprehensive volume is intended for researchers, clinicians, and policy-makers alike. 


Pain and DepressionPain and Depression: An Interdisciplinary
Patient-Centered Approach  

Clark, Michael R., M.D., and Glenn J. Treisman, M.D., Ph.D., (Editors)  2004

Pain and depression are very common complaints and often occur together.  This book discusses the relationship between chronic pain and depression, and how best to treat them when they occur together.  The topics covered include the use of opioids in chronic pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and psychological well-being in the face of pain. This book is intended both for researchers investigating chronic nonmalignant pain and for physicians dealing with patients suffering from chronic pain.

Primary Care Physician's Guide
The Primary Care Physician's Guide to Common Psychiatric and Neurologic Problems

Slavney, Phillip R., M.D., and Orest Hurko, M.D. (Editors)  2002

This book advises primary-care physicians on how to recognize, evaluate, and treat common psychiatric and neurologic complaints in patients with medical illness. Patients with these problems used to be referred to specialists, but under the current system of health care they are increasingly being evaluated and treated by internists and family practitioners.

The guide contains twelve problem-focused chapters, each written by a specialist faculty member of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who is experienced in consulting with primary care physicians. The problems discussed are sadness, nervousness, forgetfulness, unrealistic concerns about health, suicidal thoughts, alcoholism and drug dependence, weakness, numbness, back pain, headaches, dizziness, and tremor. Screening evaluations for psychiatric and neurologic disorders are also outlined and explained.

The book is designed to serve as both an introduction and a convenient reference. The authors emphasize improving communication with patients about issues of diagnosis and treatment.

Psychiatric Dimensions
Psychiatric Dimensions of Medical Practice

Slavney, Phillip R., M.D.  1998

This book is a guide to help primary-care physicians evaluate and treat patients who are delirious, demoralized, thinking of suicide, or refusing to follow medical advice.  Although these patients exhibit emotional distress, cognitive disturbance, or maladaptive behavior, the cause of the problem is often their medical illness and treatment. For that reason, many such patients can receive excellent care from their own physicians --- physicians who, given the resistance of managed care companies to specialist referrals, must now bear that responsibility in any event. After an introductory chapter on clinical assessment, the author discusses each of these common problems as it occurs in the clinical setting, with illustrative cases and specific advice about evaluation and treatment.

Parkinson's Disease
Psychiatric Issues in Parkinson's Disease:
A Practical Guide

Menza, Matthew and Laura Marsh, M.D. (Editors) 2005

A practical guide to the management of various clinical issues seen in patients with Parkinson’s disease, this text emphasizes the need for coordinated care between the various professionals, as well as between professionals and caregivers.

Providing an update on current developments in the neurology and management of Parkinson's disease, as well as the understanding and treatment of non-motor aspects of Parkinson's Disease, the book also includes a variety of topics such as depression, psychosis, and anxiety.


Psychiatry of AIDS
The Psychiatry of AIDS

Treisman, Glenn J., MD, Ph.D,
and Andrew F. Angelino, M.D. 2004

HIV/AIDS has become a psychiatric epidemic. The disease causes or exacerbates such psychiatric disorders as depression, dementia, schizophrenia, and bipolar illness. At the same time, the presence of a psychiatric disorder can lead to increased risk for HIV infection and worsen the prognosis of patients once they are infected.

This book provides HIV/AIDS professionals with overviews of psychiatric disorders, including mood and personality disorders, mental retardation, substance abuse and addiction, and sexual disorders and dysfunction. It also provides mental health professionals with essential information on how to care for patients with HIV and those at risk for the infection. The book discusses psychopharmacology, psychotherapy and counseling, as well as adherence and compliance issues, and the relationship between psychiatric disorders and other sexually transmitted diseases. It contains up-to-date information on diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, and draws on the authors' extensive experience to illustrate how psychiatric interventions can benefit the patients, and those who care for them.

Substance Abuse
The Substance Abuse Handbook

Ruiz P., Strain E.C., Langrod J.G. (Editors) 2007

The Substance Abuse Handbook succinctly presents the most clinically relevant information from Lowinson, Ruiz, Millman and Langrod's Substance Abuse: A Comprehensive Textbook, Fourth Edition. In a user-friendly format, this  handbook provides health care professionals with information needed to diagnose and treat addictive disorders and associated medical conditions. Major sections cover etiological factors, substances of abuse, compulsive and addictive behaviors, evaluation and diagnostic classification, treatment modalities, management of associated medical conditions, substance abuse in children, adolescents, and the elderly, women's issues, special groups and settings, models of prevention, training and education, and policy issues.


Tobacco
Tobacc Science, Policy and Public Health

Boyle P., Gray N., Henningfield J., Seffrin J., Zatonski W.(Editors) 2004

This book covers the science and policy issues relevant to one of the major public health problems of modern times. It pulls together the etiology and burden of the myriad of tobacco-related diseases with the successes and failures of tobacco control policies. The book looks at lessons learned to help set health policy for reducing the burden of tobacco-related diseases. It also deals with the international public health policy issues which bear on control of the problem of tobacco use and which vary between continents.


Treatment of Opioid Dependence
The Treatment of Opioid Dependence

Strain Eric C., M.D. and Maxine L. Stitzer, Ph.D. (Editors)
2006

The successor to Strain and Stitzer's Methadone Treatment for Opioid Dependence (Johns Hopkins, 1999), this expanded and updated volume reflects new developments in treatment protocols. Methadone is still the most widely used medication for the treatment of opioid dependence, and the authors provide an extensive section on methadone treatment. Three chapters cover the pharmacology and clinical use of buprenorphine as well as the latest research on naltrexone, clonidine, and lofexidine. The volume also includes chapters on pain and prescription opioids as well as medication-free treatment and medically supervised alternatives to opioid substitute treatments, including withdrawal. The Treatment of Opioid Dependence will be a valuable resource for methadone counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, mental health nurses, and addiction counselors, as well as physicians interested in office-based buprenorphine treatment.

Intellectual Disability
Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals
Oxford University Press USA, 2010
James C. Harris, M.D.

Approximately 2.5 million people in the United States--one percent of the population--have an intellectual disability (previously referred to as mental retardation). These conditions range from genetic disorders such as Down syndrome to disabilities caused by infectious diseases and brain injury. Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals , by one of the country's foremost authorities on intellectual disability, is a comprehensive resource that will be of importance to anyone with a personal connection to a child or adult with a neurodevelopmental disorder.

Emphasizing the humanity of persons with intellectual and related developmental disabilities, psychiatrist and pediatrician James Harris provides essential information on assessment and diagnosis of intellectual disability, treatments for specific disorders, and ways to take advantage of the wide array of services available today. The focus throughout is on the development of the person, the positive supports necessary for self-determination, and, to the extent possible, independent decision making. Harris also surveys historical attitudes toward intellectual disability, the medical community's current understanding of its causes and frequency, and the associated physical, behavioral, and psychiatric conditions (such as seizure disorder, depression, and autism) that often accompany particular types of intellectual disability. The book addresses legal, medical, mental health, and research-related issues as well as matters of spirituality, highlighting the ways in which individuals with intellectual disability can meaningfully participate in the spiritual lives of their families and their communities. Each chapter ends with a series of key points to remember, and the book concludes with a list of additional resources of further interest.
Intellectual Disability is a must-read for parents and families of those with neurodevelopmental disorders, providing guidance and essential information to help their family members effectively, and to make a significant, positive difference in their lives now and in the future.

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FOR PATIENT AND FAMILIES
Shrink Rap cover


SHRINK RAP
Three Psychiatrists Explain Their Work

Dinah Miller, M.D., Annette Hanson, M.D.,
and Steven Roy Daviss, M.D.
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011

In Shrink Rap, three psychiatrists from different specialties provide frank answers to questions such as:

  • What is psychotherapy, how does it work, and why don't all psychiatrists do it?
  • When are medications helpful?
  • What happens on a psychiatric unit?
  • Can Prozac make people suicidal?
  • Why do many doctors not like Xanax?
  • Why do we have an insanity defense?
  • Why do people confess to crimes they didn't commit?

Based on the authors' hugely popular blog and podcast series, this book is for patients and everyone else who is curious about how psychiatrists work. Using compelling patient vignettes, Shrink Rap explains how psychiatrists think about and address the problems they encounter, from the mundane (how much to charge) to the controversial (involuntary hospitalization). The authors face the field's shortcomings head-on, revealing what other doctors may not admit about practicing psychiatry.

Candid and humorous, Shrink Rap gives a close-up view of psychiatry, peering into technology, treatments, and the business of the field. If you've ever wondered how psychiatry really works, let the Shrink Rappers explain.


Adolescent Depression
Adolescent Depression

Mondimore, Francis Mark, M.D.  2002

Until recently, many psychiatrists and psychologists believed that adolescents did not experience depression in the way that adults do. Clinicians now realize that young people can and do get seriously depressed, and that depression and bipolar disorder may be more difficult to treat in adolescents than in adults. Depression may also be harder to recognize as an illness, both because moodiness is considered universal among teenagers and because parents often resist having their child treated for a psychiatric illness that they think - and often hope - will be "just a phase."

In this book Dr. Mondimor helps parents understand that serious depression in adolescents is an illness that can be effectively treated. He describes the many forms of depression and the many ways it can appear in young people from intensely sad feelings to irritability, anger, and destructive rages. And he answers parents' questions, including: What are the danger signals of serious depression in teenagers? How are mood disorders diagnosed? How do medications work? What about talking therapies? How does depression relate to other problems, such as drug abuse, ADHD, and eating disorders and other self-injurious behavior?

Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar Disorder

Mondimore, Francis Mark, M.D. 2006

This, the second edition of Bipolar Disorder, is thoroughly updated and discusses promising new options for diagnosis and treatment along with new information on the disease's genetic components.

Bipolar disorder can be difficult to diagnose.  Dr. Mondimore explains how symptoms fluctuate in persons with seasonal affective disorder, how they can lead to a mistaken diagnosis of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder in children, and how they may be made worse by alcohol or drug addiction.

The disease can also be difficult to treat.  Dr. Mondimore gives advice about how to pick a psychiatrist and cope with the stigma of psychiatric diagnosis.  He provides extensive information on treatment options, including the advantages, disadvantages, and side effects of various drug therapies. He also describes what it is like to live with bipolar disorder and discusses how lifestyle changes can improve the quality of life. 


Depression, The Mood Disease
Depression, the Mood Disease

Third Edition
Mondimore, Francis Mark, M.D.  2006

In the third edition of this well-received book Dr. Francis Mark Mondimore explains depression—its causes, symptoms, and treatments. He discusses depression in all age groups and in both sexes, as well as bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorders, and depression that accompanies certain medical illnesses. This edition encompasses more than a decade of new research, advances in pharmacology, and changes in public perception. The past ten years have seen the release of new forms of the major antidepressants as well as other promising new avenues in pharmaceutical treatments. For example "second generation" antidepressants, such as venlafaxine and duloxetine, provide new ways of altering the chemical systems in the brain concerned with mood. And there have been significant advances in the use of monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, now available in patch form. Dr. Mondimore reviews these and other pharmacological therapies as part of a comprehensive approach to treatment that includes psychotherapy, family and community support, and lifestyle changes.


Exuberance
Exuberance: The Passion for Life 

Jamison, Kay Redfield, Ph.D. 2005

In this book, Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison, the author of the bestselling An Unquiet Mind explores the phenomenon of exuberance and how it fuels important creative and scientific achievements.

John Muir’s passion to save America’s wild places, Wilson Bentley’s dedication to record for posterity the beauty of individual snowflakes, the scientific curiosity behind Watson and Crick’s discovery of DNA, sea lions that surf and porcupines that dance --- Dr. Jamison shows how these and many more examples both human and animal define the nature of exuberance, and how this exuberance relates to intellectual searching, risk-taking, creativity, and survival itself. She examines the hereditary predisposition to exuberance; the role of the brain chemical dopamine; the connection between positive moods and psychological resilience; and the differences between exuberance and mania. She explores some of the phenomena of exuberance --- the contagiousness of laughter, the giddiness of new love, the exhilarating effects of music and of religious ecstasy --- while also addressing the dangerous desire to simulate exuberance by using drugs or alcohol. In a coda to the rest of the book, renowned scientists, writers, and politicians share their thoughts on the forms and role of exuberance in their own lives.

getting old without getting anxious
Getting Old Without
Getting Anxious

Rabins, Peter V., M.D., M.P.H., and Lynn Lauber 2006

Getting Old Without Getting Anxious assists older people and their caregivers in overcoming one of the more crippling and misunderstood human afflictions: anxiety. Geriatric psychiatrist and co-author of The 36-Hour Day, Dr. Rabins explains that the many changes that occur as a person ages can trigger anxiety. Stories from patients encourage and motivate both those suffering from anxiety and their caregivers.


Night Falls Fast
Night Falls Fast: Understanding Suicide 

Jamison, Kay Redfield, Ph.D.  2000

Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison is the author of the bestselling memoir, An Unquiet Mind. In Night Falls Fast, Dr. Jamison examines the phenomenon of suicide, which is one of the most common killers of Americans between the ages of 15 and 45.

Dr. Jamison has known suicide firsthand: after years of struggling with manic-depression, she tried at age twenty-eight to kill herself. In this book she undertakes an historical and scientific exploration of the subject, with personal essays on individual suicides. The work helps the reader to understand the suicidal mind, to recognize and come to the aid of those at risk, and to comprehend the profound effects on those left behind.

36-Hour Day
The 36-Hour Day

Fourth Edition 
Mace, Nancy L., M.A., and Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H.
2006

Revised in 2006 for its twenty-fifth anniversary, this best-selling book is the "bible" for families caring for people with Alzheimer disease, offering comfort and support to millions worldwide. In addition to the practical and compassionate guidance that have made The 36-Hour Day invaluable to caregivers, the fourth edition is the only edition currently available that includes new information on medical research and the delivery of care. The new edition includes: new information on diagnostic evaluation; resources for families and adult children who care for people with dementia; updated legal and financial information; the latest information on nursing homes and other communal living arrangements; new information on research, medications, and the biological causes and effects of dementia.



Understanding DepressionUnderstanding Depression: What We Know and
What You Can Do About It 

DePaulo, J. Raymond, Jr., M.D., and Leslie Alan Horowitz (2003)

This book, written by the Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins, is a practical guide for individuals with depression and their families.  Dr. DePaulo discusses how to identify the problem, then directs readers to the various forms of treatment, including medications, psychotherapy, support groups, and exercise.  Understanding Depression reviews the many ways that depression can appear, and also the devastation that it can have on patients, families and loved ones, and the economy. The book also describes in depth manic depression, the bipolar form of depression,  and discusses both mainstream and alternative treatments. 

Understanding Sleeplessness
Understanding Sleeplessness

Neubauer, David N., M.D.   2003

Seemingly the most natural and necessary of pursuits, a good night’s sleep eludes a remarkable number of people—up to 50 percent of the general population, according to studies, while 10 to 15 percent suffer from severe or chronic sleep disorders. Because the causes and nature of sleeplessness are so many and varied, Dr. Neubauer believes that the diagnosis and treatment of insomnia require a flexible, multifaceted approach.  Building on the "four perspectives" conceptualized by Paul R. McHugh and Phillip R. Slavney in The Perspectives of Psychiatry, he offers understanding of what insomnia is and what should be done about it. He begins by surveying what is currently known about the mechanisms of normal sleep and, in this light, describing the problems of defining, assessing, and measuring insomnia. Drawing examples from patients studied at the Johns Hopkins Sleep Disorders Center, he then applies each of the four perspectives—diseases, dimensions of personality, goal-directed behaviors, and life stories—to the varied kinds and degrees of sleeplessness. Finally, calling on the full range of perspectives on insomnia, he outlines an integrated approach to evaluation and treatment.

An Unquiet mind
An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness

Jamison, Kay Redfield, Ph.D.  1995

As a co-author of a standard text on mood disorders, Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison is an authority on manic-depressive illness. She is also one of its survivors. And it is this dual perspective — as healer and healed — that makes her memoir so learned and affecting.

Even as she was pursuing her psychology training, Dr. Jamison found herself succumbing to the exhilarating highs and paralyzing lows that afflicted many of her patients. Though the disorder brought her seemingly boundless energy and creativity, it also propelled her into spending sprees, episodes of violence, and an attempt at suicide.
Intellectual Disability
Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals
Oxford University Press USA, 2010
James C. Harris, M.D.

Approximately 2.5 million people in the United States--one percent of the population--have an intellectual disability (previously referred to as mental retardation). These conditions range from genetic disorders such as Down syndrome to disabilities caused by infectious diseases and brain injury. Intellectual Disability: A Guide for Families and Professionals , by one of the country's foremost authorities on intellectual disability, is a comprehensive resource that will be of importance to anyone with a personal connection to a child or adult with a neurodevelopmental disorder.

Emphasizing the humanity of persons with intellectual and related developmental disabilities, psychiatrist and pediatrician James Harris provides essential information on assessment and diagnosis of intellectual disability, treatments for specific disorders, and ways to take advantage of the wide array of services available today. The focus throughout is on the development of the person, the positive supports necessary for self-determination, and, to the extent possible, independent decision making. Harris also surveys historical attitudes toward intellectual disability, the medical community's current understanding of its causes and frequency, and the associated physical, behavioral, and psychiatric conditions (such as seizure disorder, depression, and autism) that often accompany particular types of intellectual disability. The book addresses legal, medical, mental health, and research-related issues as well as matters of spirituality, highlighting the ways in which individuals with intellectual disability can meaningfully participate in the spiritual lives of their families and their communities. Each chapter ends with a series of key points to remember, and the book concludes with a list of additional resources of further interest.
Intellectual Disability is a must-read for parents and families of those with neurodevelopmental disorders, providing guidance and essential information to help their family members effectively, and to make a significant, positive difference in their lives now and in the future.

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GENETICS

Neurogenetics of Psychiatric Disorders
Neurogenetics of Psychiatric Disorders

Sawa Akira, M.D., Ph.D. and Melvin G. McInnis (Editors)
New York: Informa Healthcare, 2007

Translating bench-based research into bedside practice, this book provides an understanding of the neurobiology and neurogenetics of psychiatric disorders, the genes responsible for specific psychiatric disorders, and the implications of genetic roots and underlying biology on the development of new diagnostic approaches and treatment therapies.

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GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY
Personal Identity

Personal Identity and Fractured Selves
Perspectives from Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience
Debra J. H. Mathews, Ph.D., M.A., Hilary Bok, Ph.D., and Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H. (Editors)

This book brings together some of the best minds in neurology and philosophy to discuss the concept of personal identity and the moral dimensions of treating brain disease and injury. The contributors engage a crucial question: When an individual's personality changes radically because of disease or injury, should this changed individual be treated as the same person?

Rapid advances in brain science are expanding knowledge of human memory, emotion, and cognition and pointing the way toward new approaches for the prevention and treatment of devastating illnesses and disabilities. Through case studies of Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, deep brain stimulation, and steroid psychosis, the contributors highlight relevant ethical and social concerns that clinicians, researchers, and ethicists are likely to encounter.

Personal Identity and Fractured Selves represents the first formal collaboration between the Brain Sciences Institute and the Berman Institute of Bioethics, both at the Johns Hopkins University. The book asks neuroscientists and philosophers to address important questions on the topic of personal identity in an effort to engage both fields in fruitful conversation.


Treating Dementia

Treating Dementia
Do We Have a Pill for It?

Jesse F. Ballenger, Ph.D., Peter J. Whitehouse, M.D., Ph.D., Constantine G. Lyketsos, M.D., M.H.S., Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H., and Jason H. T. Karlawish, M.D. (Editors)

Treatments for age—related dementia and the growing reliance on pharmaceuticals to alleviate its worst symptoms raise a number of questions about attitudes toward aging and cognition, the relationship between growing older and getting sick, and the conflicting interests of patients, caregivers, physicians, scientists, and business. This volume aims to foster a constructive debate about the future of dementia treatment by providing multiple perspectives on these tangled issues. Featuring contributions from noted clinicians, researchers, and scholars from a broad range of disciplines, this multidisciplinary dialogue addresses central questions about the history and future of drug treatment for dementia and makes clear why there are no simple answers. Professionals and students involved in gerontology, psychiatry, and bioethics will find the discussion both enlightening and practical.

 

getting old without getting anxious
Getting Old Without Getting Anxious

Rabins, Peter V., M.D., M.P.H., and Lynn Lauber 2006

Getting Old Without Getting Anxious assists older people and their caregivers in overcoming one of the more crippling and misunderstood human afflictions: anxiety. Geriatric psychiatrist and co-author of The 36-Hour Day, Dr. Peter Rabins explains that the many changes that occur as a person ages can trigger anxiety. Stories from patients encourage and motivate both those suffering from anxiety and their caregivers.


Neurobiology of Primary DementiaNeurobiology of Primary Dementia
Folstein, Marshal F., M.D. (Editors) 1998

This book examines the frequency and characteristics of dementia and cognitive impairment. The contributors base their observations and conclusions on data collected within an ethnically diverse population of elderly people who use community-based health care services. 
Contributing authors explore topics ranging from familial Alzheimer’s disease, prion diseases, and dementia associated with poststroke major depression, to vascular dementia, dementia pugilistica, and head trauma as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. They also discuss diagnostic and treatment issues, as well as ethical questions involving dementia and dementia as it relates to health care reform.

Practitioners in health care and related services and policy makers will find the research, interpretation, and collective wisdom presented here helpful in decision-making about how to deal with dementia in the elderly.

Practical Dementia Care
Practical Dementia Care

Rabins, Peter V., M.D., M.P.H., Constantine Lyketsos, M.D., M.H.S., and Cynthia Steele, RN  2006

This is a comprehensive guide to the care of patients with dementia from the time of diagnosis to the end of life. It is intended for the increasing number of physicians, nurses, psychologists, social workers, rehabilitation therapists, and long-term care givers responsible for the care of individuals with dementia. For this second edition, the authors have added a chapter on mild cognitive impairment. The sections that received the most extensive revision or expansion include those on drug therapy; the pathophysiology of several causes of dementia; psychiatric symptoms of dementia and their treatment (especially drug treatment); and dementia in special environments (especially assisted living and nursing homes).


 Parkinson's Disease
Psychiatric Issues in Parkinson's Disease:
A Practical Guide

Menza, Matthew and Laura Marsh, M.D. (Editors) 2005

A practical guide to the management of various clinical issues seen in patients with Parkinson’s Disease, this text emphasizes the need for coordinated care between the various professionals, as well as between professionals and caregivers.

Providing an update on current developments in the neurology and management of Parkinson's Disease, as well as the understanding and treatment of non-motor aspects of Parkinson's Disease, the book also includes a variety of topics such as depression, psychosis, and anxiety.


36-Hour Day
The 36-Hour Day

Fourth Edition 
Mace, Nancy L., M.A., and Peter V. Rabins, M.D., M.P.H.
2006

Revised in 2006 for its twenty-fifth anniversary, this best-selling book is the "bible" for families caring for people with Alzheimer disease, offering comfort and support to millions worldwide. In addition to the practical and compassionate guidance that have made The 36-Hour Day invaluable to caregivers, the fourth edition is the only edition currently available that includes new information on medical research and the delivery of care. The new edition includes: new information on diagnostic evaluation; resources for families and adult children who care for people with dementia; updated legal and financial information; the latest information on nursing homes and other communal living arrangements; new information on research, medications, and the biological causes and effects of dementia.

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HIV/AIDS PSYCHIATRY
Psychiatry of AIDS
The Psychiatry of AIDS

Treisman, Glenn J., M.D., Ph.D.,
and Andrew F. Angelino, M.D.  2004

HIV/AIDS has become a psychiatric epidemic. The disease causes or exacerbates such psychiatric disorders as depression, dementia, schizophrenia, and bipolar illness. At the same time, the presence of a psychiatric disorder can lead to increased risk for HIV infection and worsen the prognosis of patients once they are infected.

This book provides HIV/AIDS professionals with overviews of psychiatric disorders, including mood and personality disorders, mental retardation, substance abuse and addiction, and sexual disorders and dysfunction. It also provides mental health professionals with essential information on how to care for patients with HIV and those at risk for the infection. The book discusses psychopharmacology, psychotherapy and counseling, as well as adherence and compliance issues, and the relationship between psychiatric disorders and other sexually transmitted diseases. It contains up-to-date information on diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment, and draws on the authors' extensive experience to illustrate how psychiatric interventions can benefit the patients, and those who care for them.

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