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Sarah Jo Wheelan, M.D., Ph.D.

Photo of Dr. Sarah Jo Wheelan, M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Oncology

Research Interests: DNA sequence-structure-function relationships; chromatin architecture, particularly related to cancer genomics; sequence analysis and alignment algorithms

Background

Dr. Wheelan's medical training, and her graduate training in bioinformatics at NCBI, coupled with her longstanding interest and experience in both biology and mathematics, has equipped her to address modern biological questions from an analytical perspective. Whether through the use of publicly available software or custom-coded programs, she enjoys tackling the intricate puzzles that modern biology has uncovered.

Her recent work has focused on DNA sequence-structure-function relationships. The 3D structure of chromatin in the nucleus is nonrandom, regulatory, and fascinatingly complex. There are a number of ways to query this both experimentally and computationally, including but not limited to sequencing approaches.

She is deeply committed to teaching; as director of the Center for Computational Genomics she helps organize an annual workshop (Practical Genomics) as well as a symposium, seminar series, and short courses. She teaches courses on computational biology algorithms and methods in both the medical school and the school of public health.

As co-director of the Next Generation Sequencing Center in the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (and director for bioinformatics), she helps design, execute, and analyze a variety of sequencing experiments. She is also co-director of the Kimmel Cancer Center's Experimental and Computational Genomics Core.

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Titles

  • Associate Professor of Oncology
  • Associate Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics

Education

Degrees

  • B.A., University of Colorado (Boulder) (Colorado) (1995)
  • M.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Maryland) (2003)
  • Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Maryland) (2003)

Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Wheelan's medical training, and her graduate training in bioinformatics at NCBI, coupled with her longstanding interest and experience in both biology and mathematics, has equipped her to address modern biological questions from an analytical perspective. Whether through the use of publicly available software or custom-coded programs, she enjoys tackling the intricate puzzles that modern biology has uncovered.

Her recent work has focused on DNA sequence-structure-function relationships. The 3D structure of chromatin in the nucleus is nonrandom, regulatory, and fascinatingly complex. There are a number of ways to query this both experimentally and computationally, including but not limited to sequencing approaches.

She is deeply committed to teaching; as director of the Center for Computational Genomics she helps organize an annual workshop (Practical Genomics) as well as a symposium, seminar series, and short courses. She teaches courses on computational biology algorithms and methods in both the medical school and the school of public health.

As co-director of the Next Generation Sequencing Center in the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center (and director for bioinformatics), she helps design, execute, and analyze a variety of sequencing experiments.

Core Facility: SKCCC Experimental and Computational Genomics Core

Clinical Trials

Learn more about clinical trials at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Selected Publications

View all on Pubmed

Favorov A, Mularoni L, Cope LM, Medvedeva Y, Mironov AA, Makeev VJ, Wheelan SJ. Exploring massive, genome scale datasets with the GenometriCorr package. PLoS Computational Biology. 2012

Harr JC, Luperchio TR, Wong X, Cohen E, Wheelan SJ, Reddy KL. Directed targeting of chromatin to the nuclear lamina is mediated by chromatin state and A-type lamins. J Cell Biol. 2015

Wu H, Luo J, Yu H, Rattner A, Mo A, Wang Y, Smallwood PM, Erlanger B, Wheelan SJ, Nathans J. Cellular resolution maps of x chromosome inactivation: implications for neural development, function, and disease. Neuron. 2014

Mularoni L, Zhou Y, Bowen T, Gangadharan S, Wheelan S‡, Boeke J‡. Retrotransposon Ty1 integration targets specifically positioned asymmetric nucleosomal DNA segments in tRNA hotspots. Genome Res. 2012

Gangadharan S*, Mularoni L*, Fain-Thornton J, Wheelan SJ‡, Craig NL‡. DNA transposon Hermes inserts into nucleosome free regions. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010

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