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Barbara R. Migeon, M.D.

Photo of Dr. Barbara R. Migeon, M.D.

Professor of Pediatrics

Expertise: Genetics, Medical Genetics

Research Interests: Molecular basis of X chromosome inactivation; Genomic imprinting in human cells; Relevance to human disease; Sex determination ...read more

Contact for Research Inquiries

733 N Broadway, 459
Baltimore, MD 21205 map

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Background

Dr. Barbara Migeon is a professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her research focuses on sex determination, relevance to human disease, genomic imprinting in human cells, and molecular basis of X chromosome inactivation.

Dr. Migeon is currently engaged in research related to the mechanisms responsible for X chromosome dosage compensation in human females. Her research concerns not only the molecular basis for the single active X, but also the genetic consequences (cellular mosaicism, cell selection). She is also studying the effect of mosaicism on the phenotype and health of women.

She received her undergraduate degree from Smith College and earned her M.D. from the University of Buffalo. After completing a residency in pediatrics from Johns Hopkins, she performed a fellowship in endocrinology at Harvard and a fellowship in genetics at Johns Hopkins.  

Dr. Migeon has had an active career, participating in numerous scientific committees related to human genetics and women in science. She has been on the editorial board of various scientific publications and served as the associate editor of Cancer Research and The Journal of Experimental Zoology. She has published extensively about her research and mentored scores of medical students and researchers.

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Titles

  • Professor of Pediatrics

Departments / Divisions

Education

Additional Training

Education
M.D.
University of Buffalo
Buffalo, NY

B.A.
Smith College
Northampton, MA

Training
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Pediatrics
Baltimore, MD

Fellowships
Johns Hopkins University
Genetics
Baltimore, MD

Harvard University
Endocrinology
Cambridge, MA

Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Migeon is interested in the mechanisms responsible for X chromosome dosage compensation in human females. Her research concerns not only the molecular basis for the single active X, but also the genetic consequences (cellular mosaicism, cell selection). She is also studying the effect of mosaicism on the phenotype and health of women.

Selected Publications

View all on Pubmed

Migeon BR. "Titles and abstracts of scientific reports ignore variation among species." eLife, doi: 10.7554/eLife.05075. December, 2014

Migeon BR. "The single active X in human cells: evolutionary tinkering personified." Human Genetics 130:281-293, 2011. (Published online: 08 June 2011).

Migeon Br, Pappas K, Stetten G, Trunca C, Jacobs PA. "X inactivation in triploidy and trisomy; the search for autosomal transfactors that choose the active X." Eur J Hum Genet.16: 153-162, 2008

Migeon, BR. "The Role of X Inactivation and Cellular Mosaicism in Women's Health and Sex-Specific Diseases." JAMA. 2006; 295:1428 -1433.

Migeon, BR. "Is Tsix repression of Xist specific to mouse?" Nature Genetics 33: 337, 2003.

Activities & Honors

Professional Activities

  • Member, Advisory Board, Office of Women in Science & Medicine, 2009
  • Member, NIH Study Section: The Molecular Genetics Study Section, Breast Cancer Research Program (Univ of Cal), 1995 - 1998
  • Member, NIH Study Section: The Genome Study Section, 1991 - 1993
  • Director, Human Genetics course for graduate students in the Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics, 1980 - 1989
  • Founding Director, Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics, 1979 - 1989
  • Preceptor, Predoctoral Training Program in Human Genetics, 1979
  • Member, University Wide Committee for Human Genetics, 1979
  • Member, Board of Directors, American Society of Human Genetics, 1977 - 1980
  • Member, NIH Study Section: The Mammalian Genetics Study Section, 1975 - 1977
  • Co-Director, Human Genetics course for medical students, 1974 - 1980
  • Member, NIH Study Section: The Genetic Study, 1974 - 1975
  • Past- Member, Editorial boards: Trends in Genetics, Cancer Research, Cytogenetics & Cell Genetics
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