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Nazbanou Nozari, M.D., Ph.D.

Photo of Dr. Nazbanou Nozari, M.D., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Research Interests: Language production, Executive control, Aphasia

Background

Dr. Nazbanou Nozari is an assistant professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is also a member of the Department of Cognitive Science at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. 

Her research focuses on understanding the cognitive and neural architecture of the language production system and how it interacts with other cognitive systems, especially the executive control system. Her recent work has expanded this focus to language learning, as well as re-learning of the lost language after brain damage.

Dr. Nozari received her M.D. at Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. She completed an MA in cognitive psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Champaign, Illinois. She earned her PhD in cognitive psychology, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in Champaign, Illinois.

She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in cognitive neuropsychology at the Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute as well as a postdoctoral fellowship in cognitive neuroscience at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins, Dr. Nozari was a post-doctoral researcher and undergraduate mentor at the University of Pennsylvania.

In 2016 she was elected to the Academy of Aphasia Membership Board as well as the editorial board of Frontiers in Psychology journal (Cognition section). Her work has been recognized most recently with the American Psychological Association’s New Investigator Award, as well as by being selected for the Emerging Women Leadership Program at Johns Hopkins University.

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Titles

  • Assistant Professor of Neurology

Departments / Divisions

Education

Degrees

  • M.D., Tehran University of Medical Sciences (Iran) (2005)
  • Ph.D., University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) (Illinois) (2011)

Research & Publications

Research Summary

My research focuses on understanding the cognitive and neural architecture of the language production system and how it interacts with other cognitive systems, especially the executive control system. Together with my students and my collaborators, we have several lines of research, studying the role of executive control in lexical retrieval and grammatical encoding in children, younger and older adults, bilinguals, and individuals with aphasia, with the overarching goal of understanding how the language production system is monitored and regulated. My recent work has expanded this focus to language learning, as well as re-learning of the lost language after brain damage.

Selected Publications

Hanley, R.J., Cortis, C., Budd, M.J., & Nozari, N. (2016). Did I say dog or cat? A study of semantic error detection and correction in children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 142, 36-47.

Breining, B., Nozari, N., & Rapp, B. (2015). Does segmental overlap help or hurt? Evidence from blocked cyclic naming in spoken and written production. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 1-7.

Nozari, N., Goksun, T., Thompson-Schill, S.L., & Chatterjee, A. (2015). Phonological similarity affects production of gestures, even in the absence of speech. Frontiers in Psychology, 6 (1347). doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01347

Nozari, N. & Thompson-Schill, S.L. (2015). Left Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Processing of Words and Sentences. In G. Hickok & S.L. Small (Eds.), The Neurobiology of Language (pp. 569-588).Waltham, MA: Academic Press.

Nozari, N., Arnold, J. E., & Thompson-Schill, S. L. (2014). The Effects of Anodal Stimulation of the Left Prefrontal Cortex on Sentence Production. Brain stimulation, 7(6), 784-792.

Dell, G. S., Nozari, N., & Oppenheim, G. M. (2014). Lexical access: Behavioral and computational considerations. In V. Ferreira, M. Goldrick, & M. Miozzo (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Language Production (pp. 88-104). Oxford University Press.

Nozari, N., Woodard, K., & Thompson-Schill, S. L. (2014). Consequences of cathodal stimulation for behavior: when does it help and when does it hurt performance? PloS one, 9(1), e84338.

Nozari, N., & Thompson-Schill, S.L. (2013). More attention when speaking: does it help or does it hurt? Evidence from tDCS. Neuropsychologia, 51(13), 2770-2780.

Nozari, N., & Dell, G.S. (2013). How damaged brains repeat words: A computational approach. Brain & Language. 126(3), 327-337.

Dell, G. S., Schwartz, M. F., Nozari, N., Faseyitan, O., & Branch Coslett, H. (2013). Voxel-based lesion-parameter mapping: Identifying the neural correlates of a computational model of word production. Cognition, 128(3), 380-396.

Nozari, N., & Dell, G. S. (2012). Feature migration in time: Reflection of selective attention on speech errors. Journal of Experimental Psychology-Learning Memory and Cognition, 38(4), 1084-1090.

Budd, M. J., Hanley, & J.R., Nozari, N. (2012). Evidence for a non-lexical influence on children's auditory repetition of familiar words. Journal of Psycholinguistic research, 41(4), 253-266.

Nozari, N., Dell, G.S., Schwartz, M.F. (2011). Is comprehension the basis for error detection? A conflict-based theory of error detection in speech production. Cognitive Psychology, 63(1), 1-33.

Nozari, N., Kittredge, A.K., Dell, G.S., Schwartz, M.F. (2010). Naming and repetition in aphasia: Steps, routes, and frequency effects. Journal of memory and Language, 63, 541-559.

Nozari, N., Ferri, C.P., Farin, F., Noroozian, M., Salehi, M., Seyedian, M., & Prince, M. (2009). Validation of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group's 10/66 Dementia diagnosis in Iran. International Psychogeriatrics,21(3), 604-605.

Nozari, N., & Dell, G.S., (2009). More on lexical bias: how efficient can a "lexical editor" be? Journal of Memory and Language, 60, 291-307.

Nozari, N., & Tahmasebi M. (2007). Thromboembolism and Its Particular Importance in Orthopedics. Tehran University Journal of Orthopedics, 22,12-7. [article in Persian]

Behzadi, A., Nozari, N., Ekhtiari, H. (2006). Reasoning, Induction and Language; Literature Review and the Practical Methods of Assessment. Iranian Journal of Cognitive Science, 4, 24-29. [article in Persian]

Nozari, N., Dell, G.S., Schneck, K., & Gordon, B. (2015). Implementation of selective attention in sequential word production. In D. C. Noelle, R. Dale, A. S. Warlaumont, J. Yoshimi, T. Matlock, C. D. Jennings, & P. P. Maglio (Eds.), Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1745-1750). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Akhavan, N., Nozari, N., & Goksun, T. (2015). Motion event expressions in language and gesture: Evidence from Persian. In D. C. Noelle, R. Dale, A. S. Warlaumont, J. Yoshimi, T. Matlock, C. D. Jennings, & P. P. Maglio (Eds.), Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 60-65). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Nozari, N. (2014). Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) to study and treat aphasia. Frontiers in Psychology. doi:10.3389/conf.fpsyg.2014.64.00008.

Nozari, N. (2014). Using Transcranial tDCS to test cognitive hypotheses. Frontiers in Psychology. doi:10.3389/conf.fpsyg.2014.64.00009

Nozari, N., Mirman, D., Thompson-Schill, S.L. (2014). The role of the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in online sentence processing. Frontiers in Psychology. doi:10.3389/conf.fpsyg.2014.64.00012

Middleton, E., Schwartz, M.F., Graziano, K., Brown, D., & Nozari, N. (2014) A Paradigm for Investigating Executive Control Mechanisms in Word Retrieval in Language-Impaired and Neurotypical Speakers. Frontiers in Psychology.doi:10.3389/conf.fpsyg.2014.64.00066

Schwartz, M.F., Middleton, E., Nozari, N., Brecher, A., Gagliardi, M., Garvey, K. (2014). Learning from your mistakes: The functional value of spontaneous error monitoring in aphasia. Frontiers in Psychology.doi:10.3389/conf.fpsyg.2014.64.00070

Nozari, N., Woodard, K., & Thompson-Schill, S. (2013). Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Facilitatory, inhibitory, or both? Journal of cognitive neuroscience, (pp. 174-174). MIT Press, Cambridge, MA.

Nozari, N., & Schwartz, M. (2012). Fluency of Speech Depends on Executive Abilities: Evidence for Two Levels of Conflict in Speech Production. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 61, 183-184.

Nozari, N., Dell, G., & Schwartz, M. (2012).Who Are the Lexical-routers? An Investigation into the Nature of Word Repetition in Aphasia. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 61, 104-105.

Nozari, N. & Dell, G.S. (2011). Selective attention and speech errors: feature migration in time. In L. Carlson, C. Hölscher, & T. Shipley (Eds.), Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1370-1375). Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society.

Dell, G. S., Nozari, N., Kittredge, A.K., & Schwartz, M. F. (2009). Theoretical perspectives on impairments in spoken language processing. Proceedings of the 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Cognitive Science Society.

Academic Affiliations & Courses

Courses and Syllabi

  • Cognitive and Neural Basis of Executive Control
    Assistant Professor
    Department of Cognitive Science, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University
    2016 - 2016

Activities & Honors

Honors

  • Selected for the Emerging Women Leadership Program, sponsored by the Office of Women in Science and Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 2016
  • New Investigator Award, American Psychological Association, 2013 - 2014
  • Robert J. Glushko Award for best dissertation in Cognitive Science, 2010 - 2011

Memberships

  • Academy of Aphasia (Membership Board committee member), 2016
  • Psychonomic Society (Fellow), 2016
  • Cognitive Science Society, 2010
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