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Fred Bunz, M.D., Ph.D.

Photo of Dr. Fred Bunz, M.D., Ph.D.

Director, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center Cell Imaging Core Facility

Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences

Research Interests: Loss of innate immunity during tumorigenesis. Human DNA damage responses and the cellular roles of p53. ...read more

Background

Dr. Fred Bunz is an associate professor of radiation oncology and molecular radiation sciences and oncology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research focuses on cancer genetics.

Dr. Bunz serves as the director of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center Cell Imaging Core Facility and the co-director for the Laboratory Training Program in Radiation Oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

His team is engaged in studying the signaling molecules and pathways that are activated by DNA damage. The goal of this work is to better understand how current therapies work, and to develop new and improved cancer treatments.

Dr. Bunz earned his M.D. and Ph.D. in the Medical Scientist Training Program at State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook. He completed postdoctoral fellowships at Johns Hopkins and Howard Hughes Medical Institution.

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Titles

  • Director, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center Cell Imaging Core Facility
  • Co-director, Laboratory Training Program in Radiation Oncology
  • Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences
  • Associate Professor of Oncology

Centers & Institutes

Education

Degrees

  • Ph.D., State University of New York (Stony Brook) (New York) (1994)
  • M.D., Stony Brook University School of Medicine (Stony Brook) (New York) (1995)

Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Bunz’s research objective is to understand the genetic basis of common cancers and to determine how recurrent genetic alterations affect treatment with existing and novel therapeutic agents.

Ionizing radiation is a mainstay of therapy for most types of cancer. The DNA strand breaks, crosslinks, adducts and DNA replication intermediates that are caused by ionizing radiation and many other therapeutic agents trigger activation of a complex network of intracellular signaling molecules that ultimately control cell growth and cell death. Employing recently developed technology, the Bunz laboratory studies the signaling molecules and pathways that are activated by DNA damage. The goal of this work is to better understand how current therapies work, and to develop new and improved cancer treatments.

Lab

Dr. Bunz’s laboratory studies the molecular basis of cancer therapy. Our goal is to determine how p53 and other mediators of the DNA damage response are activated by therapeutic agents, and to understand how these pathways ultimately control cell growth and death, and mediate tumor suppression.

Core Facility: SKCCC Cell Imaging

Clinical Trials

Learn more about clinical trials at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. 

Selected Publications

View all on Pubmed

1. Bunz F, Kobayashi R, Stillman B. cDNAs encoding the large subunit of human replication factor C. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 1993;90(23):11014-11018.

2. Bunz F, Dutriaux A, Lengauer C, Waldman T. Zhou S, Brown J P, Sedivy JM, Kinzler KW, and Vogelstein B. Requirement for p53 and p21 to Sustain G2 Arrest After DNA Damage. Science. 1998; 282(5393):1497-1501.

3. Wilsker D, Petermann E, Helleday T, Bunz F. Essential function of Chk1 can be uncoupled from DNA damage checkpoint and replication control. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2008;105(52):20752-57. PMCID: PMC2634938

4. Chung JH, Bunz F. Cdk2 is required for p53-independent G2/M checkpoint control. PLoS Genetics. 2010; 6:e1000863. PMCID: PMC2829054

5. Chung JH, Larsen AR, Chen E, Bunz F. A PTCH1 homolog transcriptionally activated by p53 suppresses hedgehog signaling. J Biol Chem. 2014; 289(47):33020-33031. PMCID: PMC4239647

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