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Lawrence Mark Nogee, M.D.

Photo of Dr. Lawrence Mark Nogee, M.D.

Professor of Pediatrics

Male

Expertise: Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Neonatology

Research Interests: Interstitial lung disease; Childhood interstitial lung disease; Genetic surfactant dysfunction disorders; Neonatal lung disease

Locations

The Johns Hopkins Hospital
Appointment Phone: 410-955-5259

600 N. Wolfe Street
Sheikh Zayed Tower
Baltimore, MD 21287 map
Phone: 410-614-3355
Fax: 410-614-8388

Background

Dr. Lawrence Nogee is a professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His area of clinical expertise is neonatology, with a particular focus on genetic surfactant dysfunction disorders and neonatal lung disease. 

Dr. Nogee received his medical degree at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1981. He went on to complete a residency in pediatrics in 1984, also at Johns Hopkins.

His current research focuses on childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD), a group of poorly understood illnesses that cause chronic breathing problems in children, often starting in infancy and leading to progressive lung damage.

Dr. Nogee has over 40 publications in peer-reviewed journals. He holds certifications in neonatal and perinatal medicine and in pediatrics from the American Board of Pediatrics.

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Titles

  • Professor of Pediatrics

Education

Degrees

  • MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (1981)

Residencies

  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine / Pediatrics (1984)

Board Certifications

  • American Board of Pediatrics / Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine (1987)
  • American Board of Pediatrics / Pediatrics (1986)

Research & Publications

Research Summary

Dr. Nogee studies childhood interstitial lung disease (ILD). He recently received a grant from the ATS Foundation and the chILD Foundation to conduct research related to the genetic mechanisms that are related to ILD.

His current research focuses on a on a candidate gene called CCR2 which has a role in controlling how cells respond to inflammation. Previous work revealed that a mutation in this gene mutation was present in three siblings with ILD. The next steps will be to understand precisely how and why lack of protein in those with CCR2 mutations leads to lung disease and whether CCR2 mutations are responsible for other cases of pediatric ILD.

Dr. Nogee and collaborators discovered other genetic defects associated with infant lung diseases, including the discoveries in 2001 and 2004 that mutations in the genes encoding surfactant protein C and a protein called ABCA3 cause neonatal lung disease, as well as interstitial lung disease (ILD) in older children and adults. 

Selected Publications

View all on Pubmed

Wambach JA, Casey AM, Fishman MP, Wegner DJ, Wert SE, Cole FS, Hamvas A, Nogee LM. "Genotype-phenotype correlations for infants and children with ABCA3 deficiency." Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2014 Jun 15;189(12):1538-43. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201402-0342OC. PubMed PMID: 24871971; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4226019.

Avital A, Hevroni A, Godfrey S, Cohen S, Maayan C, Nusair S, Nogee LM, Springer C. "Natural history of five children with surfactant protein C mutations and interstitial lung disease." Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014 Nov;49(11):1097-105. doi: 10.1002/ppul.22971. Epub 2013 Dec 17. PubMed PMID: 24347114.

Henderson LB, Melton K, Wert S, Couriel J, Bush A, Ashworth M, Nogee LM. "Large ABCA3 and SFTPC deletions resulting in lung disease." Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2013 Dec;10(6):602-7. doi: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201306-170OC. PubMed PMID: 24024739; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3960967.

Gower WA, Nogee LM. "Candidate gene analysis of the surfactant protein D gene in pediatric diffuse lung disease." J Pediatr. 2013 Dec;163(6):1778-80. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2013.06.063. Epub 2013 Aug 9. PubMed PMID: 23932215; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3846094.

Kurland G, Deterding RR, Hagood JS, Young LR, Brody AS, Castile RG, Dell S, Fan LL, Hamvas A, Hilman BC, Langston C, Nogee LM, Redding GJ; American Thoracic Society Committee on Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease (chILD) and the chILD Research Network. "An official American Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline: classification, evaluation, and management of childhood interstitial lung disease in infancy." Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Aug 1;188(3):376-94. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201305-0923ST. Review. PubMed PMID: 23905526; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3778735.

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