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Myron L. Weisfeldt, M.D.

Photo of Dr. Myron L. Weisfeldt, M.D.

University Distinguished Service Professor

Professor of Medicine

Male

Expertise: Cardiology, Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine

Research Interests: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Sudden Death

Locations

The Johns Hopkins Hospital
Appointment Phone: 443-997-0270

600 N. Wolfe Street
Sheikh Zayed Tower
Baltimore, MD 21287 map

Contact for Research Inquiries

1830 East Monument Street
Suite 9026
Baltimore, MD 21287 map
Phone: 410-955-6642
Fax: 410-614-8510

Background

Dr. Myron Weisfeldt was the William Osler Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine from 2001 to 2014. He was also Physician-in-Chief of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Dr. Weisfeldt has broad interests in hemodynamics, cardiovascular aging, and resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Dr. Weisfeldt received a BA and MD from the Johns Hopkins University. He trained in Cardiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and the National Institutes of Health. From 1991 to 2001, he was Chairman of the Department of Medicine and Samuel Bard Professor of Medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Director of the Medical Service at the Columbia-Presbyterian Campus of the New York Presbyterian Hospital. From 1975 to 1991, he was Director of the Cardiology Division at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Weisfeldt was Chairman of the Cardiology Advisory Board of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute from 1987 to 1990 and held the position of President of the American Heart Association in 1990. Dr. Weisfeldt is a member of the Institute of Medicine. His research interests have included heart function, age changes in the heart and circulation, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In 2003 he was appointed by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to be the Study Chair for a large-scale ongoing clinical trials network to conduct randomized definitive trials of devices, drugs and other therapies for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and severe traumatic injury. This network is called Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. 

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Titles

  • University Distinguished Service Professor
  • Former Director, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • Former Physician-in-Chief, Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Former Director of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine
  • Professor of Medicine

Departments / Divisions

Centers & Institutes

Education

Degrees

  • B.A., Johns Hopkins University (Year I/Human Biology Pgm) (Maryland) (1962)
  • M.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (Maryland) (1965)

Research & Publications

Selected Publications

Papers

  1. Weisfeldt ML, Wright JR, Shreiner DP, Lakatta EG, Shock NW: Coronary flow and oxygen extraction in perfused hearts of senescent male rats. J. Appl. Physiol. 30:44‑49, 1971.
  2. Lakatta EG, Gerstenblith G, Angell CS, Shock NW, Weisfeldt ML: Diminished inotropic response to aged myocardium to catecholamines. Circ. Res. 36:262‑269, 1975.
  3. Weiss JL, Frederiksen JW, Weisfeldt ML: Hemodynamic determinants of the time course of fall in canine left ventricular response. J. Clin. Invest. 58:751‑760, 1976.
  4. Gerstenblith G, Lakatta EG, Weisfeldt ML: Age change in myocardial function and exercise response. Prog. Cardiovasc. Dis. 19:1‑21, 1976.
  5. Templeton GH, Platt MR, Willerson JT, Weisfeldt ML: Influence of aging left ventricular hemodynamic and stiffness in beagles. Circ. Res. 44(2):189‑194, 1977.
  6. Taylor GJ, Tucker WM, Greene HL, Rudikoff MT, Weisfeldt ML: Importance of prolonged compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in man. New Engl. J. Med. 296:1515‑1517, 1977.
  7. Gerstenblith G, Frederiksen J, Yin FCP, Fortuin NJ, Lakatta EG, Weisfeldt ML: Echocardiographic assessment of a normal adult aging population. Circulation 56:273‑278, 1977.
  8. Spurgeon HA, Thorne PA, Yin FCP, Shock NW, Weisfeldt ML: Increased dynamic stiffness of trabeculae carneae from the senescent rat. Am. J. Physiol. 1:H373‑H378, 1977.
  9. Yin FCP, Raizes GS, Guarnieri T, Spurgeon HA, Lakatta EG, Fortuin NJ, Weisfeldt ML: Age associated decrease in ventricular response to hemodynamic stress during beta‑adrenergic blockade. Brit. Heart J. 40:1349‑1355, 1978.
  10. Mirowski M, Reid PR, Mower MM, Watkins L, Gott VL, Schauble J, Langer A, Heilman MS, Fischell RE, Weisfeldt ML: Termination of malignant ventricular arrhythmias with an implanted automatic defibrillator in human beings. New Engl. J. Med. 303:322‑324, 1980.
  11. Yin FCP, Weisfeldt ML, Milnor WR: The role of aortic input impedance in the decreased cardiovascular response to exercise with aging in the dog. J. Clin. Invest. 68:28‑38, 1981.
  12. Weisfeldt ML, Becker L: Resuscitation after cardiac arrest - A 3-phase time-sensitive model. Commentary: JAMA. 288:23, 3035-3038, 2002.
  13. The Public Access Defibrillation Trial Investigators (Weisfeldt ML as a member of the steering committee and writing group): Public-access defibrillation and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. NEJM. 351:637-646, 2004
  14. Weisfeldt ML, Sitlani CM, Ornato JP, Rea T, Aufderheide TP, Davis D, Dreyer J, Hess EP, Jui J, Maloney J, Sopko G, Powell J, Nichol G, Morrison LJ, and the ROC Investigators: Survival after application of automatic external defibrillators before arrival of the emergency medical system: evaluation in the resuscitation outcomes consortium population of 21 million. JACC.; 55:1713-20, PMID: 20394876, 2010
  15. Weisfeldt ML, Everson-Stewart S, Sitlani C, Rea T, Aufderheide TP, Atkins DL, Bigham B, Brooks SC, Foerster C, Gray R, Ornato JP, Powell J, Morrison LJ and the ROC Investigators: Ventricular tachyarrythmias after cardiac arrest in public versus at home. NEJM. 364:313-321, PMID: 21268723, 2011
  16. Stiell IG, Nichol G, Leroux BG, Rea TD, Ornat JP, Powell J, Christenso J, Callaway CW, Kudenchuk PJ, Aufderheide TP, Idris AH, Daya M, Wang HE, Morrison LJ, Davis D, Andrusiek D,Stephens S, Cheskes S, Schmicker RH, Fowler R, Vaillancourt C, Hostler D, Zive D,Pirrallo RG,Vilke G, Sopko G, Weisfeldt ML, and the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortim (ROC) Investigators. Early versus later rhythm in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. NEJM. 365:9, 787-797, 2011

Patents

Integrated system for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and circulation support
Patent # 4397306 | 09/09/1983

An integrated system for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and circulation support comprising chest compression means adapted to be positioned over the patient's sternum and operable to compress the sternum at desired intervals and to a desired degree, lung ventilating means including (1) a high pressure ventilator for ventilating simultaneously with chest compression; (2) a low pressure ventilator for inflating the lungs at low pressure between a selected number of compression cycles; and (3) a negative pressure ventilator for deflating the lungs between chest compressions; valve means for selectively operating only one of the indicated ventilators at any one time; means for restricting the abdomen to exert pressure on the abdominal wall; and control means for selectively operating the chest compression means, the lung ventilating means, valve means and abdomen restriction means in a selected sequence and for the period of time desired.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Assisted Circulation System
Patent # 4928674 | 05/29/1990

A vest system for generating cyclic fluctuations in intrathoracic pressure for use in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and non-invasive circulatory assistance. The vest is preferably provided with a two bladder inflation system. A high pressure bladder contacts the chest wall while a bias bladder is disposed between the high pressure bladder and the vest material. The bias bladder is pressurized to press the high-pressure bladder tightly against the chest wall so that cyclic inflation of the high-pressure bladder can generate large changes in intrathoracic pressure. The bias bladder is released periodically to allow the chest to expand for adequate ventilation. Air flow into and out of each bladder is controlled by sequencing large bore 3-way and 2-way solenoid valves and the rate of air flow into the high-pressure bladder is controlled by a variable resistor.

ECG Amplifier and Cardiac Pacemaker for Use during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR insensitive pacemaker)
Patent # 5217010 A | 08/02/1993

A device for monitoring a patient or pacing a patient is disclosed which can safely operate in a MRI system. The device uses unique RF filtering and shielding to attenuate voltages on the leads resulting from the high frequency RF signals produced in the MRI. The device is uniquely shielded to prevent induced currents from disrupting the amplifying and processing electronics. The device uses an optional secondary low pass or band reject filter to eliminate interference from the MRI's gradient magnetic field. The device uses optional inductors placed close to electrodes to limit RF currents through the electrodes. Several embodiments of the RF filter are taught which depend on the number of sensing leads, whether the leads are shielded, whether the RF filter is contained in the electronic shielded housing or whether single or multistage filtering is employed. The device may operate as an extended ECG monitor or may be an implantable MRI safe pacemaker.

Mri interference-filtered monitor, stimulator and pacemaker
Patent # WO1992021286 A1 | 04/08/1994

A device for monitoring, stimulating or pacing a patient to safely operate in an MRI system, uses RF filtering (104-110) to eliminate interference from the MRI gradient magnetic field and shielding (122) to attenuate voltages on the leads resulting from the high frequency RF signals produced in the MRI to prevent induced currents from disrupting the amplifying and processing electronics (124).

Cardiac assist method using an inflatable vest
Patent # 6752771 B2 | 01/14/1998

A method and device are disclosed for inflating an inflatable vest to assist the heart in patients suffering from heart failure. The inflation of the vest is synchronized with on-set of the systole phase of the heart, when the left ventricular compresses to force blood out of the heart and through the aorta. The inflated vest compresses the patient's chest and increases the intrathoracic pressure. This increase in pressure assists the heart in moving blood out of the heart and through the aorta. In addition, the vest is arranged to leave the patient's abdomen free of restraint so that the increase in intrathoracic pressure due to the vest moves blood into the abdomen, and to allow the abdomen to dynamically recoil in response to the vest inflation. In addition, ECG signals from electrodes applied to the patient are processed to trigger the vest inflation in real time with the current heartbeat cycle, such that the vest inflation is triggered when the heart begins to contract.

Cardiac assist method using an inflatable vest
Patent # 6179793 B1 | 01/14/1998

A method is disclosed for inflating an inflatable vest to assist the heart in patients suffering from heart failure. The inflation of the vest is synchronized with on-set of the systole phase of the heart, when the left ventricular compresses to force blood out of the heart and through the aorta. The inflated vest compresses the patient's chest and increases the intrathoracic pressure. This increase in pressure assists the heart in moving blood out of the heart and through the aorta. In addition, the vest is arranged to leave the patient's abdomen free of restraint so that the increase in intrathoracic pressure due to the vest moves blood into the abdomen, and to allow the abdomen to dynamically recoil in response to the vest inflation. In addition, ECG signals from electrodes applied to the patient are processed to trigger the vest inflation in real time with the current heartbeat cycle, such that the vest inflation is triggered when the heart begins to contract. A controller provides an adjustable signal blanking period to avoid noise components following the QRS complex.

Portable negative pressure ventilation device and methods and software related thereto
Patent # 8571663 B2 | 10/29/2013

Featured is an apparatus an apparatus including a monitoring and sensing means, an electrode patch and a control device operably coupled to each of the sensing means and the electrodes and outputs signals to the electrodes for purposes of stimulating the phrenic nerve to thereby cause breathing by natural contraction of the diaphragm. The control device is configured and arranged to initially localize the phrenic nerve with respect to a given set of electrodes that is effective, when appropriately energized, for stimulating the phrenic nerve to establish negative pressure induced respiration in the body, based on the output signal(s) from the monitoring and sensing means. After such initially localizing; the control device thereafter repetitively outputs stimulation signals via the given set of electrodes so as to thereby continuously stimulate negative pressure induced respiration. Also featured are methods related thereto.

Activities & Honors

Honors

  • Phi Beta Kappa, Johns Hopkins, 1962
  • Alpha Omega Alpha, Johns Hopkins, 1965
  • American Physiological Society, 1974
  • American Society for Clinical Investigation, 1977
  • Interurban Clinical Club, 1982
  • Association of American Physicians, 1988
  • Fellow, American Association for Advancement of Science, 1991
  • Award of Merit recipient, American Heart Association, 1992
  • Elected member, Institute of Medicine, 1996
  • Gold Heart Award, American Heart Association, 1998
  • Member, American Clinical and Climatological Association, 2003
  • Recipient Herrick Award of the Council on Clinical Cardiology, American Heart Association, 2004
  • John Phillips Memorial Award, American College of Physicians, 2006
  • Diversity Award, Association of Professors of Medicine, 2008

Professional Activities

  • Cardiology Advisory Board, NHBLI, 1986 - 1990
  • Chairman, Cardiology Advisory Board, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, 1987 - 1990
  • President, AHA (National), 1989 - 1990
  • Study Chair, Executive Committee Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 2003
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