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Promise and Progress - Gift Brings Complementary Care to Cancer Patients

The Time is Now: 2010-2011

Gift Brings Complementary Care to Cancer Patients

Date: November 11, 2010


In addition to the best medical treatment, our cancer patients will now have access to a full range of complementary services to aid in their physical and emotional recovery. The Kimmel Cancer Center’s new Complementary and Integrative Care Program will provide a variety of services, including massage, acupuncture, Reiki, guided imagery, training in relaxation techniques, nutrition counseling, and psychotherapy.

This important addition to Kimmel Cancer Center services is being made possible through the Ruth Carol Complementary and Integrative Care Endowment.

“We know that many patients seek out these kinds of services during the course of their cancer treatment, and we are excited to be addressing their needs and enhancing the comfort and well being of patients of the Kimmel Cancer Center,” says Harriet Legum, an advisory council member, who has helped raise money for the Complementary and Integrative Care Program.

Complementary care will be provided in the Hackerman-Patz Patient and Family Pavilion, our facilities at Green Spring Station and at the bedside for inpatients, and will be available to all patients regardless of their ability to pay.

Linda A. Lee, M.D., Director of the Johns Hopkins Integrative Medicine and Digestive Center, will oversee complementary practitioners providing services for Kimmel Cancer Center patients. Lee’s research and clinical efforts are focused on liver and other gastrointestinal cancers. It was her interactions with cancer patients and others with chronic digestive problems that led her to recognize the value of integrative medicine.

“Unfortunately, many chronic conditions exist for which there are presently no cures. But the lack of a cure for these disorders should not prevent a patient from achieving an improved quality of life and sense of well-being,” says Lee.  “This is how integrative medicine is most helpful, because it is where conventional medical practices and the best of other healing modalities intersect to bring a comprehensive approach to the patient's condition.”

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