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Managed Care Partners - Landon King: A Journey from Intern to Executive Vice Dean

Managed Care Partners Fall 2013

Landon King: A Journey from Intern to Executive Vice Dean

Date: November 1, 2013


Working to foster collaboration between disparate parts of the school of medicine, Landon King aims to advance Johns Hopkins’ long-held mission of education, research and patient care.
Working to foster collaboration between disparate parts of the school of medicine, Landon King aims to advance Johns Hopkins’ long-held mission of education, research and patient care.

Landon king, named Executive Vice Dean for the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine last December, says he has long felt Johns Hopkins was his home.

Before receiving his medical degree from Vanderbilt University in 1989, King recalls he looked at just a small number of places for residencies in internal medicine. “Once I came here,” he says, “I thought, This is the place I want to be. That sentiment has been reinforced many times over.”

Experience at Johns Hopkins

King, who also is the David Marine Professor of Medicine and Biological Chemistry, director of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and vice dean for research at Johns Hopkins Medicine, has had an impressive career. He joined the Osler medical service as an intern in 1989, and as a postdoctoral fellow, and later, after joining the faculty as an assistant professor in 1997, he undertook important studies of water channels in the lung with 2003 Nobel Laureate Peter Agre. In 2005, he was selected as the director of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and in 2011 was named vice dean for research.

In that role, King has demonstrated an exceptional ability to work closely with leaders throughout the university to advance all aspects of basic and translational research at the school of medicine. The school has been among the largest recipients of biomedical funding from the National Institutes of Health for years, receiving $436 million in 2012. King has facilitated collaborative research by working with colleagues to assess core resources and research infrastructure while also overseeing research administration, policy coordination, and the identification and coordination of technology transfer opportunities.

“I like being engaged, and I’m very fortunate to have been offered leadership opportunities along the way in pulmonary medicine, then the Department of Medicine and then the school,” King says.

What's On the Horizon in King's New  Position

In his new role, King is assisting Paul Rothman, dean of the school of medicine and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine, in overseeing operations and program development. These responsibilities extend to areas of broad reach within the school and Johns Hopkins Medicine, including oversight of the school’s budget and space, as well as fostering development and implementation of cross-cutting efforts such as data sciences and research infrastructure. 

“Having been engaged in the strategic planning process and other ongoing program evaluations in the school of medicine,” says King, “this is a time of challenge but also great opportunity. I am trying to facilitate interaction between different constituencies in the school to advance all parts of our mission.”

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