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Johns Hopkins Bayview News - Have You Had Your Breast Cancer Screening?

Fall 2013

Have You Had Your Breast Cancer Screening?

By: Meghan Rossbach
Date: October 7, 2013


African American woman being shown how to perform a self-breast exam
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Early detection of breast cancer saves thousands of lives each year. That’s why it’s so important for women to take advantage of breast cancer screenings throughout the year, not just during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

Annual screening mammograms are recommended for women who are 40 years or older, or for younger women with specific risk factors for breast cancer. Women don’t need to have any signs or symptoms of a breast abnormality to receive a screening. The goal of a screening exam is to find cancers before they start to cause symptoms.

If breast cancer is found because it’s already causing symptoms, it’s more likely to have spread beyond the breast. Cancers found at an early stage during screening exams are more likely to be smaller and confined to the breast, which improves the chances of survival and requires less aggressive treatment.

The multidisciplinary team at the Johns Hopkins Breast Center promotes the importance of breast cancer screenings and encourages women in the community to schedule an appointment for their yearly mammogram.

“A woman knows her body better than anyone else,” says Mehran Habibi, M.D., surgical oncologist and medical director of the Breast Center. “Regular physical exams and annual mammograms can go a long way in preventing the spread of disease. When cancer is detected, it’s important for a woman to know we are here and ready to take care of her.”

To schedule a mammogram or to make an appointment with the Johns Hopkins Breast Center on the Hopkins Bayview campus, call 410-550-8282 (choose option one). For more information, visit hopkinsmedicine.org/johns_hopkins_bayview/medical_services/lab_and_imaging_services/mammography.

Breast Cancer Facts

Aside from non-melanoma skin cancer breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in the United States. It is second only to lung cancer in mortality. According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer screenings reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer can lead to:

  • A greater range of treatment options
  • Less extensive surgery
  • Better treatment outcomes
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