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Dome - An economic boost

November 2011

An economic boost

Date: November 14, 2011


Environmental Services is one area that will expand staff as the size of the hospital complex doubles. Here Carole Johns, Sonia Stevenson, Charlene Partlow and Dameian Jones perform the first of two major cleaning and inspecting sessions on level 10 of th
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Environmental Services is one area that will expand staff as the size of the hospital complex doubles. Here Carole Johns, Sonia Stevenson, Charlene Partlow and Dameian Jones perform the first of two major cleaning and inspecting sessions on level 10 of the Zayed Tower.

How much elbow grease does it take to scour 1.6 million square feet of space? The answer, says Ken Grant, vice president for general services at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, translates into 125 new jobs to meet housekeeping needs in the expansive new clinical buildings.

The first 24 hires in Environmental Services started their jobs in July, and the rest will come on board by March, assuring a fully staffed team by the April opening of the Sheikh Zayed Tower and The Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children’s Center.

The entry-level positions will be filled from outside of Hopkins and following a detailed timeline, Grant says. “We have a schedule for when we will recruit, when we will hire, when we will train and when we will assign them to their new locations.”

The hiring boom generated by the new buildings doesn’t stop with Environmental Services. Altogether, the Hopkins workforce will expand by 700 members, including nurses, respiratory therapists, social workers, pharmacy technicians, MRI technicians, security guards, and patient and visitor services personnel. (In the School of Medicine, there “may be a smattering of hires, but restricted to the ICU settings,” says Edward “Ted” Chambers, co-director with Christina Lundquist of the new clinical buildings transition team.)

In the midst of an economic slump, the new jobs are welcome news for Baltimore, says Bonnie Windsor, senior director of human resources. “Between the new clinical buildings and the launch of Epic, our electronic medical record system, we have had and will have many opportunities not only for people in the community but in Maryland. It’s a tremendous number of openings to have at one time.” 

Staying right on time

The first group of new employees went to work in July to provide Environmental Services with enough manpower to maintain the historic hospital while also clearing dust and debris in the new clinical buildings as construction continued. 

Rightsizing the nursing workforce to correspond with increased work volume in the new clinical buildings will require more than 200 additional jobs, according to projections. Many of those positions have been created for the greatly expanded adult and pediatric intensive care units. Such specialty areas require more experience and advanced training and “are always harder to fill,” says Lori Faber, coordinator of nurse recruitment in the Department of Nursing.

Meanwhile, unanticipated vacancies in various nursing units must be filled as soon as possible. Nursing must also find a way to fill shifts for staff members so they can receive necessary training on new equipment and workflow processes.

Increased staffing needs are also challenging the facilities department. In spite of high unemployment figures, qualified applicants for 27 new engineering positions are scarce, says Anatoly Gimburg, the department’s senior director. “We’ve been working closely with Human Resources, but it’s been tough.”

To explore new job opportunities at Hopkins Hospital, visit www. hopkinsmedicine.org/jhhr.

—Stephanie Shapiro

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