Skip Navigation
News and Publications
 
 
 
In This Section      
Print This Page

Dome - Mentees Pull Their Own Weight

Dome September 2013

Mentees Pull Their Own Weight

Date: September 1, 2013


It takes hard work as well as a mentor to achieve your professional goals, DeNiro DeGross says.
1 2 3
It takes hard work as well as a mentor to achieve your professional goals, DeNiro DeGross says.

Three-and-a-half years ago, DeNiro DeGross, a recent high school graduate, took a part-time job in nutrition services at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. He scrubbed pots, delivered food trays and filled in where needed. It was a start, but DeGross wanted the security of a full-time job with better pay and a chance to advance.

Today, DeGross works full time transporting patients in the hospital. This fall, he is set to begin a radiology technician program at a local community college, with tuition covered by Johns Hopkins. Without his mentor though, he’d still be scrubbing pots, DeGross says. 

When he was accepted to the Making a Difference Mentoring program early last year, DeGross was paired with Kenneth Grant, vice president of general services. Grant helped establish the mentoring program in 2011 to promote professional growth for underrepresented minority employees in his department. 

DeGross credits Grant for his new confidence. “He made me believe that I could do anything within this hospital if I put in the time and the effort.”

In turn, Grant has high praise for his mentee: “I’ve watched him settle down, create a more professional impression and take school seriously.”

—Stephanie Shapiro

 

 
Related Content

© The Johns Hopkins University, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Health System. All rights reserved.

Privacy Policy and Disclaimer