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Women’s Health Research Presented at National Conference in Las Vegas - 01/26/2017

Women’s Health Research Presented at National Conference in Las Vegas

Release Date: January 26, 2017
Pregnant
Credit: iStock

What: The Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s 37th annual Pregnancy Meeting
When: Jan. 26–28, 2017
Where: Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada


****Embargoed for release until Jan. 26 at 12:30 p.m. UTC****
Ultrasound Screening May Help Providers Predict If a Baby Will Need Lifesaving Therapy After Birth
Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. UTC
The Octavius Ball Room

When a fetus has a congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), which is a hole in the diaphragm that allows abdominal contents such as the bowel and liver to enter the chest cavity, the baby's lungs do not develop properly. Specialized treatment called extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is sometimes needed after birth to help the baby get enough oxygen. Because quick action is often necessary in treating infants with CDH, the research team decided to investigate tools that could potentially speed up care. The researchers looked at an ultrasound measurement called the observed-to-expected lung-to-head ratio (O/E LHR), which describes the size of the fetal lung relative to what the lung size would be in a normal fetus at that time in pregnancy. Their research concluded that it’s the most useful prenatal ultrasound information available to determine the baby's likelihood of needing ECMO therapy after birth. This has the potential advantage of planning the immediate management after birth in a more patient-tailored way.

Researchers Dana Block-Abraham, D.O., instructor of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Ahmet Baschat, M.D., professor of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, are available for phone interviews about their study after their presentation.
 

****Embargoed for release until Jan. 26 at 12:30 p.m. UTC****
Genetic Testing Needed for Pregnant Women to Help Providers Determine If Baby Is at Risk for Skeletal Disorders
Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. UTC
The Octavius Ball Room

When skeletal findings are visualized on routine fetal ultrasound imaging, health care professionals are currently only able to provide patients with a genetic diagnosis of a skeletal disorder about half of the time. There is a need for more accurate testing in the field. This particular research explores the use of genetic testing to better diagnose fetal skeletal disorders. Future implementation of whole-exome sequencing will likely improve the ability of providers to offer patients a more accurate diagnosis of a skeletal disorder even before the baby is born. An exact diagnosis is essential in order to provide prospective parents with information as to what to expect after birth and the chance for a recurrence of a severe disorder in future children. It is only by having an accurate diagnosis that one can provide timely and accurate prenatal diagnosis options for future pregnancies, according to the research.

Researcher Angie C. Jelin, M.D., assistant professor of gynecology and obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be available for phone interviews about this research after the presentation.

For the Media

Contacts:

410-287-8560
tgraha10@jhmi.edu
 
410-502-9468
anilawe1@jhmi.edu