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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: April 30, 2015


Aravinda Chakravarti, Ph.D., and Donald Geman, Ph.D., have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters. They are among 84 new members elected on April 28, 2015. Chakravarti is being recognized for his contributions to the field of genomics; Geman, for his achievements in statistics, image analysis and machine learning. They will be inducted at the academy’s annual meeting next spring.

Released: April 30, 2015


A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers concludes that most U.S. clinical registries that collect data on patient outcomes are substandard and lack critical features necessary to render the information they collect useful for patients, physicians and policy makers.

Released: April 29, 2015


Brigitte Sullivan, administrative director of the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center, has been elected as the board chair of the Living Legacy Foundation of Maryland, which encourages state residents to save and enhance lives through organ and tissue donations that honor the legacy of the donors.

 

Released: April 28, 2015


Current public health guidelines recommend that only gay men and people with HIV should be routinely screened for extragenital gonorrhea and chlamydia, given the high burden of these sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in this at-risk population.

Released: April 28, 2015


In the midst of an international campaign to slow the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization recommends male circumcision (the surgical removal of foreskin from the penis) which reduces HIV acquisition by 50-60%.  However, scientists report that a new study of HIV-infected men in Uganda has identified a temporary, but potentially troublesome unintended consequence of the procedure: a possible increased risk of infecting female sexual partners while circumcision wounds heal.

Released: April 27, 2015

DNA regulatory tags must be cut out and replaced to allow neurons to function


Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered that neurons are risk takers: They use minor “DNA surgeries” to toggle their activity levels all day, every day. Since these activity levels are important in learning, memory and brain disorders, the researchers think their finding will shed light on a range of important questions.

Released: April 27, 2015


Jie Xiao, Ph.D., an associate professor of biophysics and biophysical chemistry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, has won the inaugural Hamilton Smith Award for Innovative Research. The award provides research funds for promising junior researchers at the medical school whose work is laying the foundation for future medical advances. It is named for a Nobel Prize winner whose discovery while he was a young faculty member at Johns Hopkins revolutionized the field of biology.

Released: April 27, 2015


Researchers from Johns Hopkins performing sophisticated motion studies of heart MRI scans have found that specific altered function in the left atrium — one of the heart’s four chambers — may signal stroke risk in those with a-fib and, possibly, those without it. 

Released: April 27, 2015

May is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month


Join us for "Important Updates in Bladder Cancer Treatment: A Program for Ptients and Caregivers."

Released: April 27, 2015

Military and civilian medical experts discuss state of the science at Johns Hopkins conference


A one-day conference examining the state of the science on post-traumatic stress disorder and suicidality among U.S. military service members and veterans will take place on May 4 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Released: April 27, 2015


The Social Innovation Lab at The Johns Hopkins University will host its Impact+Innovation Forum on April 27, featuring talks from a cohort of nine emerging social enterprises on their innovative work addressing challenges in the areas of medicine, food, community and technology in Baltimore and beyond. 

Released: April 23, 2015


Timothy Pawlik, director of the Division of Surgical Oncology at Johns Hopkins, has been awarded an honorary fellowship in the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons (RACS).

Released: April 23, 2015

Disordered eating pattern can lead to obesity, other health problems


Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, are significantly more likely to have an eating disorder — a loss of control eating syndrome (LOC-ES) — akin to binge eating, a condition more generally diagnosed only in adults,  according to results of a new Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study. The findings suggest a common biological mechanism linking the two disorders, and the potential for developing treatment that works for both.

Released: April 22, 2015


The immune-boosting properties of breast milk have long been known. Now a team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins pediatric surgeon-in-chief David Hackam, M.D., Ph.D., says experiments in mice reveal how breast milk works to ward off the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating intestinal disorder.

Released: April 22, 2015


Kay Redfield Jamison, Dalio Family Professor in Mood Disorders, and co-director of the Mood Disorders Center, has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Released: April 22, 2015


Four Johns Hopkins University researchers received monetary awards for translational development of their inventions at the April 20 annual joint meeting of the Johns Hopkins Alliance for Science and Technology Development and the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Commercial Advisory Board.

Released: April 21, 2015


Timothy Pawlik, director of the Division of Surgical Oncology at Johns Hopkins, has been named deputy editor of JAMA Surgery

Released: April 20, 2015


A bundled intervention focused on evidence-based infection prevention practices, safety culture and teamwork, and scheduled measurement of infection rates considerably reduced central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) across intensive care units (ICUs) in seven Abu Dhabi hospitals, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality report.

Released: April 20, 2015

Nearly one-quarter of intensive care unit survivors have post-traumatic stress disorder; diaries could be successful prevention tool


In a recent Johns Hopkins study, researchers found that nearly one-quarter of ICU survivors suffer from PTSD. They also identified possible triggers for PTSD and indicated a potential preventive strategy: having patients keep ICU diaries. 

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