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Prostate Cancer Awareness Week Fundraiser to Feature Renowned Urologist Patrick Walsh - 09/12/2011

Prostate Cancer Awareness Week Fundraiser to Feature Renowned Urologist Patrick Walsh

Release Date: September 12, 2011

** MEDIA ADVISORY **

Johns Hopkins urologist Patrick Walsh, M.D., who pioneered nerve-sparing prostate removal surgery to reduce the chance of impotence and incontinence, will deliver the keynote address at a fundraising dinner on the Johns Hopkins medical campus on Sept. 14. The event is in advance of Prostate Cancer Awareness Week, Sept. 18-24.

Dr. Walsh’s talk is entitled: Screening, prevention, treatment: What will it take to win the war on prostate cancer? He will summarize the advances made over the past decade that have led to a 40 percent reduction in prostate cancer deaths. He will also address concerns about over-diagnosis and over-treatment.

WHEN:
Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WHERE:
Armstrong Medical Education Building (second floor atrium)
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
1600 McElderry St., Baltimore, Md., 21205

For 30 years, Dr. Walsh served as the professor and director of the Brady Urological Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He performed his 4,569th radical prostatectomy in June and, while he has stopped operating, he continues to see patients, conduct research and teach. He has also written two books for consumers: The Prostate: A Guide for Men and the Women Who Love Them and Dr. Patrick Walsh’s Guide to Surviving Prostate Cancer.

Proceeds from the dinner will fund prostate cancer research at Johns Hopkins. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. An estimated 240,000 men in the United States will be diagnosed with it this year. During prostate cancer awareness week, men age 50 and older (age 45 for African-Americans) are encouraged to speak with their physician about prostate cancer screening. The disease usually progresses very slowly and, in most cases, if detected early, it can be treated effectively.

For the Media

Media Contacts:
Ellen Beth Levitt, 410-955-5307, eblevitt@jhmi.edu
David March, 410-955-1534, dmarch1@jhmi.edu
(Please let us know in advance if you plan to cover the event).

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