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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: October 20, 2014


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) has awarded the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center’s Breast Cancer Program a $1.7 million grant over five years to fund educational programs, enhance support and increase awareness for young women diagnosed with breast cancer.

Released: October 16, 2014

Johns Hopkins Medicine Demonstrates Hospital Preparedness


With the heightened media coverage of the Ebola virus disease outbreak, it’s only natural to feel anxious about it. It’s important to know the facts.  

Released: October 15, 2014

Completion of the construction project marks a significant step in campus redevelopment goals


Nelson/Harvey Building renovations at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in East Baltimore are complete after a nearly 24-month construction project to completely modernize the two buildings originally built in 1977. The makeover adds 136 new private patient rooms, which will be used primarily for Department of Medicine, pulmonology, gastroenterology and cardiac medicine patients.

Released: October 15, 2014


The Johns Hopkins Hospital has been recognized as a Leader in LGBT Healthcare Equality by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, the educational arm of the country’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization. 

Released: October 13, 2014


The Johns Hopkins Hospital celebrates with a ribbon-cutting ceremony the completion of another significant step in its East Baltimore campus redevelopment project. After nearly 24 months of construction, the Nelson and Harvey buildings, originally built in 1977, will reopen with 136 all-private patient rooms with sleeping accommodations for family members, family respite areas on each floor, updated software and equipment for caregivers, and many more modern amenities.

Released: October 13, 2014


Five bladder cancer experts will be awarded research grants totaling $250,000 from the Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute on Oct. 15. The grant awards will be the centerpiece of a day-long board meeting. The event will culminate with the unveiling of a ceremonial plaque marking the establishment of the new institute that was made possible with a landmark gift from Baltimore-area commercial real estate developer Erwin Greenberg and his wife, Stephanie Cooper Greenberg.

Released: October 13, 2014

Improvements were seen within four weeks and generally persisted during treatment duration


Results of a small clinical trial suggest that a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts — and best known for claims that it can help prevent certain cancers — may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders.

Released: October 10, 2014

Health system limits sales of sugar-sweetened drinks on campuses


Johns Hopkins Medicine announces the start of its Healthy Beverage Initiative, a program designed to ensure that beverages containing relatively low levels of sugar are more readily available in the hospital cafeterias, vending machines and retail outlets on many Johns Hopkins Medicine campuses.

Released: October 9, 2014


Two Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine faculty members have been approved for research funding totaling almost $5 million from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

Released: October 9, 2014


Dorothy Roberts, author of Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Recreate Race in the Twenty-First Century, will deliver the keynote address at the fifth annual Henrietta Lacks Memorial Lecture this Saturday, Oct. 11, at 9 a.m. in Turner Auditorium on the campus of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine. Admission to the lecture is free.

Released: October 9, 2014

Results of study on rodents with Rett syndrome signal potential for dietary help for people with other autism spectrum disorders


When young mice with the rodent equivalent of a rare autism spectrum disorder, called Rett syndrome, were fed a diet supplemented with the synthetic oil triheptanoin, they lived longer than mice on regular diets. Importantly, their physical and behavioral symptoms were also less severe after being on the diet, according to results of new research from The Johns Hopkins University.

Released: October 9, 2014

Most irregularities are “false alarms,” and more precise measures are needed, researchers say


Researchers at Johns Hopkins have added to evidence that continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring, widely used during maternal labor, has so many false positive readings that it is unable to reliably identify fetal brain injury caused by oxygen deficiency. Results of the new study by a team at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine appeared in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, the official publication of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists popularly known as “The Green Journal.”

Released: October 8, 2014

“Heart attack in a dish” model offers glimpse inside cardiac cells during, after heart attack


Heart attack survivors often experience dangerous heart rhythm disturbances during treatment designed to restore blood flow to the injured heart muscle, a common and confounding complication of an otherwise lifesaving intervention

Released: October 8, 2014


Johns Hopkins scientists have shown a strong association between tobacco use or exposure and infection with oral human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16), the sexually transmitted virus responsible for mouth and throat cancers worldwide. The numbers of such cancers have increased 225 percent in the United States over the past two decades.

Released: October 8, 2014


The National Institutes of Health have awarded $21 million to researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and seven other institutions to develop an antimicrobial solution that prevents HIV infection following anal intercourse. Johns Hopkins is the principal site for the research trials.

Released: October 7, 2014


Johns Hopkins and other cancer researchers report that a very short course of a chemotherapy drug, called cyclophosphamide, not only can prevent a life-threatening immune response in some bone marrow transplant recipients, but also can eliminate such patients’ need for the usual six months of immune suppression medicines commonly prescribed to prevent severe forms of this immune response. Patients receive cyclophosphamide for two days after their bone marrow transplant, in addition to two other chemotherapy drugs given before the transplant.

Released: October 7, 2014

New game immerses players in the ocean — and in a sea creature’s mind


A multidisciplinary team at Johns Hopkins has used the principles of neuroscience to hijack our sense of what is and isn’t real. The result is a deceptively simple yet uniquely immersive video game, I Am Dolphin, slated for release on iTunes on Oct. 9.

Released: October 6, 2014

Added drug testing in mice shows role of preosteoclasts in maintaining bone health


Experiments in mice with a bone disorder similar to that in women after menopause show that a scientifically overlooked group of cells are likely crucial to the process of bone loss caused by the disorder, according to Johns Hopkins researchers. Their discovery, they say, not only raises the research profile of the cells, called preosteoclasts, but also explains the success and activity of an experimental osteoporosis drug with promising results in phase III clinical trials.

Released: October 6, 2014


Johns Hopkins Children’s Center infectious disease specialist Sanjay Jain, M.D., has earned a Transformative Research Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for his ongoing work to design a new noninvasive imaging method that can rapidly identify a wide variety of bacterial infections and monitor their response to treatment in real time.

Released: October 3, 2014

Study suggests some symptoms in human version of the disorder could be eased


Studying mice with a genetic change similar to what is found in Kabuki syndrome, an inherited disease of humans, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have used an anticancer drug to “open up” DNA and improve mental function.

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