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Current News Releases

Released: May 4, 2016

Candida infections also more common among those with memory loss


In a study prompted in part by suggestions from people with mental illness, Johns Hopkins researchers found that a history of Candida yeast infections was more common in a group of men with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder than in those without these disorders, and that women with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who tested positive for Candida performed worse on a standard memory test than women with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who had no evidence of past infection.

Released: May 4, 2016

Andrew Cherlin, Timothy Heckman, Kenneth Kinzler, Geraldine Seydoux among 84 new members of nonprofit institution


Four members of the Johns Hopkins University faculty are among 84 new members and 21 foreign associates from 14 countries elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

Released: May 4, 2016

Blend of natural and man-made materials works best, study in mice shows


To make a good framework for filling in missing bone, mix at least 30 percent pulverized natural bone with some special man-made plastic and create the needed shape with a 3-D printer. That’s the recipe for success reported by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University in a paper published April 18 online in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

Released: May 3, 2016

Physicians advocate for changes in how deaths are reported to better reflect reality


Analyzing medical death rate data over an eight-year period, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts have calculated that more than 250,000 deaths per year are due to medical error in the U.S. Their figure, published May 3 in The BMJ, surpasses the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) third leading cause of death — respiratory disease, which kills close to 150,000 people per year.

Released: April 28, 2016


This Friday, April 29, the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center will celebrate National Pet Therapy Day in the Children’s Center lobby from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m.

Released: April 27, 2016

What dermatologists need to know about African-American hairstyling practices and the risk of traction alopecia.


In a review of 19 studies, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they can confirm a “strong association” between certain scalp-pulling hairstyles — many common among African-Americans — and the development of traction alopecia, gradual hair loss caused by damage to the hair follicle from prolonged or repeated tension on the hair root. An estimated one-third of African-American women suffer from traction alopecia, making it the most common form of hair loss among that group.

Released: April 27, 2016


John Niparko, M.D., an internationally renowned otoneurologic surgeon and researcher whose extraordinary accomplishments as the founder of the Johns Hopkins Listening Center and pioneering innovator in cochlear implant procedures dramatically improved the lives of countless children and adults with hearing impairment, died on April 25 in Los Angeles. He was 61

Released: April 26, 2016


Eight Johns Hopkins physicians have been elected to the Association of American Physicians (AAP) and two have been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI).

Released: April 26, 2016


Journalists are invited to hear from several Johns Hopkins-affiliated startups as Digital Health Day continues with Mid-Atlantic University Technology Day. 

Released: April 25, 2016


A new study using 5,000 stored blood samples found no increase in the presence of food-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) — a blood marker associated with food allergy — in children’s blood between the 1980s and the 2000s.

Released: April 22, 2016

Novel tool expected to speed research on brain and drug development


Studying a new type of pinhead-size, lab-grown brain made with technology first suggested by three high school students, Johns Hopkins researchers have confirmed a key way  in which Zika virus causes microcephaly and other damage in fetal brains: by infecting specialized stem cells that build its outer layer, the cortex. 

Released: April 21, 2016


Johns Hopkins will host the first-ever U.S. International Tracheostomy Symposium with a keynote speech from former Ravens football player O.J. Brigance, who was diagnosed with ALS in 2007, a disease that left him with a long-term tracheostomy — a procedure to open a person’s airway with a tube, also called a trach.

Released: April 20, 2016


The American Academy of Arts and Sciences today announced the election of 213 new members, including two Johns Hopkins University faculty members, Alex L. Kolodkin, Ph.D., and Andrew J. Cherlin, Ph.D. Also elected was Sanford Greenberg, chair of the board of governors of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins.

Released: April 20, 2016


Results of a multi-institutional national study of nearly 700 people who survived life-threatening illness with a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU) suggest that a substantial majority of them are at high risk for persistent depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder — especially if they are female, young and unemployed.

Released: April 19, 2016


Argye Hillis, M.D., a professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is serving on a team of researchers from several institutions who will use an $11 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study stroke recovery.

Released: April 19, 2016


In a clinical trial of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, half of 25 patients with a rare type of virus-linked skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma experienced substantial tumor shrinkage lasting nearly three times as long, on average, than with conventional chemotherapy. Several patients had no remaining evidence of disease. Results of the study are expected to be presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2016 (abstract CT096) in New Orleans and published online April 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released: April 19, 2016


The Social Innovation Lab at The Johns Hopkins University will host its Impact+Innovation Forum featuring presentations from our cohort of nine emerging social enterprises

Released: April 18, 2016


A new analysis of 204 studies involving more than 1.4 million people suggests that metformin, the most frequently prescribed stand-alone drug for type 2 diabetes, reduces the relative risk of a patient dying from heart disease by about 30 to 40 percent compared to its closest competitor drug, sulfonylurea

Released: April 18, 2016


On April 13, Solomon H. Snyder, M.D., was awarded the Salk Institute’s Medal for Research Excellence together with cancer biologist Robert Weinberg, from MIT’s Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. The award has only been given twice before in the Salk Institute’s 55-year history. 

Released: April 15, 2016


An experimental antibody treatment decreased by half the number of cancer stem cells that drive the growth of tumors in nearly all patients with multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow and bone tissue, according to results of a preliminary clinical trial led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists.