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Current News Releases

Current News Releases

Released: December 24, 2014

Discovery has implications for immune system regulation


Researchers at Johns Hopkins have discovered what keeps an enzyme from becoming overzealous in its clipping of DNA. Since controlled clipping is required for the production of specialized immune system proteins, an understanding of what keeps the enzyme in check should help explain why its mutant forms can lead to immunodeficiency and cancer.

Released: December 24, 2014


Competing public performance reports can misinform patients and health care providers, say safety experts from the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and the Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research. The paper, published this week in the American Journal for Accountable Care, states that variability in public reports can produce conflicting information that could lead to confusion and leave patients and clinicians with little assurance about the integrity of the data provided.

Released: December 22, 2014


Results of a small Johns Hopkins Children’s Center study show that hospitalized children given high-dose IV infusions of the antibiotic vancomycin to treat drug-resistant bacterial infections face an increased risk for kidney damage — an often reversible but sometimes serious complication.

Released: December 22, 2014

Decrease of “spongy” bone related to adoption of sedentary lifestyle


New research shows that modern human skeletons evolved into their lightly built form only relatively recently — after the start of the Holocene about 12,000 years ago, and even more recently in some human populations. The work, based on high-resolution imaging of bone joints from modern humans and chimpanzees as well as from fossils of extinct human species, shows that for millions of years, extinct humans had high bone density until a dramatic decrease in recent modern humans.

Released: December 22, 2014

Organizations will jointly enhance access and affordability of health care services


Officials at Highmark Health, Allegheny Health Network, Highmark Inc. and Johns Hopkins Medicine today announced the signing of a new master collaboration agreement that will complement the formal oncology collaboration that began earlier this year. These collaborations aim to leverage the collective strengths of the organizations and improve the availability and affordability of health care to Pennsylvania patients.

Released: December 17, 2014

Points to new strategy to reduce allergic responses to many medications


Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, they say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV.

Released: December 17, 2014


As foreign and domestic health care workers in West Africa fight to contain the deadliest Ebola virus disease outbreak in history, a group of disaster response and modeling experts from Johns Hopkins say a potential pool of manpower to help care for patients with Ebola is being overlooked and should be tapped quickly: people who have survived and recovered from Ebola virus infection.

Released: December 16, 2014

Clinical trial shows no beneficial effects on key measures of heart disease and diabetes risk


Good news for people who are already following a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and low in sweets: New research suggests these heart-healthy eaters don’t need to worry about choosing low glycemic index foods to lower the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

Released: December 16, 2014

Study could lead to mitochondrial DNA blood tests to foretell risk


New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) found in peoples’ blood directly relates to how frail they are medically. This DNA may prove to be a useful predictor of overall risk of frailty and death from any cause 10 to 15 years before symptoms appear.

Released: December 15, 2014

Johns Hopkins/Jhpiego design aims to reduce infection risks for health care workers


An advanced protective suit for health care workers who treat Ebola patients, devised by a Johns Hopkins team, is one of the first five awardees in a federal funding contest aimed at quickly devising new tools to combat the deadly disease.

Released: December 15, 2014

New study by Johns Hopkins researchers could boost vaccine development efforts


Using a specially selected library of different hepatitis C viruses, a team of researchers led by Johns Hopkins scientists has identified tiny differences in the pathogens’ outer shell proteins that underpin their resistance to antibodies.

Released: December 11, 2014


The Food and Drug Administration wants to know when and why costlier brand-name drugs are used instead of generic ones. The organization has tapped a team at Johns Hopkins for a two-year study that will analyze factors that determine underuse of generic drugs

Released: December 10, 2014

Johns Hopkins study is largest so far of gene expression in autism brains


While many different combinations of genetic traits can cause autism, brains affected by autism share a pattern of ramped-up immune responses, an analysis of data from autopsied human brains reveals. The study, a collaborative effort between Johns Hopkins and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, included data from 72 autism and control brains.

Released: December 10, 2014


Many children who sustain so-called open bone fractures in the forearm or lower leg can, and do, heal safely without surgery, according to the results of a small study led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

Released: December 9, 2014

Protein inhibitor makes cell susceptible to chemotherapy


Triple-negative breast cancer is as bad as it sounds. The cells that form these tumors lack three proteins that would make the cancer respond to powerful, customized treatments. Instead, doctors are left with treating these patients with traditional chemotherapy drugs that only show long-term effectiveness in 20 percent of women with triple-negative breast cancer. Now, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have discovered a way that breast cancer cells are able to resist the effects of chemotherapy — and they have found a way to reverse that process.

Released: December 9, 2014


Journalists are invited to hear from more than 20 Johns Hopkins-affiliated startups on Dec. 10 at an event entitled “A Healthcare Technology Day.” The showcase, which will run from 2 to 6 p.m. at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, will feature presentations by company management and offer opportunities for one-on-one interviews.

Released: December 9, 2014

A step toward cracking the code of how brains work


Whether we’re paying attention to something we see can be discerned by monitoring the firings of specific groups of brain cells. Now, new work from Johns Hopkins shows that the same holds true for the sense of touch. The study brings researchers closer to understanding how animals’ thoughts and feelings affect their perception of external stimuli.

Released: December 3, 2014


Akira Sawa, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavorial Sciences and director of the Johns Hopkins Schizophrenia Center, has been named the inaugural Sachiko Kuno and Ryuji Ueno Innovation Professor, endowed by scientists, biotech entrepreneurs and philanthropists Ryuji Ueno and Sachiko Kuno.

Released: December 3, 2014


Johns Hopkins University has been awarded a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging to fund a center that will conduct research on the informal support resources of vulnerable older adults.

Released: December 1, 2014


Johns Hopkins researchers report that their test of an interventional X-ray guidance device approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2013 has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure of patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy (IAT) for liver cancer.

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