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Information for the Media

Recent News Releases

Released: 08/28/2014

The news in July that HIV had returned in a Mississippi toddler after a two-year treatment-free remission dashed the hopes of clinicians, HIV researchers and the public at large tantalized by the possibility of a cure.

Released: 08/27/2014

Many African-Americans may not be getting effective doses of the HIV drug maraviroc, a new study from Johns Hopkins suggests. The initial dosing studies, completed before the drug was licensed in 2007, included mostly European-Americans, who generally lack a protein that is key to removing maraviroc from the body. The current study shows that people with maximum levels of the protein — including nearly half of African-Americans — end up with less maraviroc in their bodies compared to those who lack the protein even when given the same dose. A simple genetic test for the gene that makes the CYP3A5 protein could be used to determine what doses would achieve effective levels in individuals, the researchers say.

Released: 08/27/2014

A combination of two drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for different applications reduces wound healing time by one-quarter and significantly decreases scar tissue in mice and rats, Johns Hopkins researchers report. If the findings, reported in the September issue of the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, hold true in future human studies, the dual treatment could speed skin healing in people with skin ulcers, extensive burns, surgical wounds and battlefield injuries.

Released: 08/26/2014

Regardless of their stage or type, cancers appear to share a telltale signature of widespread changes to the so-called epigenome, according to a team of researchers. In a study of a broad variety of cancers, the investigators say they have found widespread and distinctive changes to chemical marks known as methyl groups attached to DNA. Those marks help govern whether genes are turned “on” or “off,” and ultimately how the cell behaves. Such reversible chemical marks on DNA are known as epigenetic, and together they make up the epigenome.

Released: 08/25/2014

Modern Healthcare, a leading industry publication, has named Johns Hopkins Medicine Dean and CEO Paul B. Rothman, M.D., and patient safety expert Peter J. Pronovost, M.D., Ph.D., to this year’s 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare list. The list recognizes individuals deemed by their peers and experts as leaders in the industry.

 

Media Relations and Public Affairs

The Johns Hopkins Medicine Division of Media Relations and Public Affairs is Johns Hopkins Medicine's official communications link to local, national and international media. The media relations staff supports The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, with centralized, coordinated communications, providing round-the-clock services and products for print, online and electronic media and is the official JHM institutional, faculty and staff link to news media.

The Media Relations staff is available to respond to journalists' inquiries and requests. In addition to providing news releases and tip sheets, we also provide:

  • Photographs and digital images
  • Interview scheduling
  • Studio for on-site radio taping or remote interviewing
  • Background information on research and faculty

All Hopkins Press Offices

Broadcast Services

  • Health NewsFeed
    Health NewsFeed, a daily radio news service offering one-minute "packages" of Hopkins-vetted medical information to millions of listeners via satellite and the Web, is also produced and distributed by the Media Relations team.
     
  • Podcasts
    Johns Hopkins Medicine is pleased to present its new health podcast, a lively discussion of the week’s medical news and how it may affect you. This seven to ten-minute free program features Rick Lange, M.D., chief of clinical cardiology, and Elizabeth Tracey, director of the Hopkins Health NewsFeed, a radio news service program.
     
  • RSS Service: Johns Hopkins Medicine press releases
    Johns Hopkins Medicine science and medical news is now available through an RSS service, free of charge.

Studio Services
Through the appropriate media representative, Johns Hopkins experts can be interviewed at a local satellite-capable video studio for live or live-to-tape television interviews. The studio is available 24/7. Please contact your media representative to make the arrangements.

Subscribe to our Listserv
Many of our news releases are distributed under embargo.  Only journalists and working freelance writers are eligible to subscribe.  To enroll in our direct e-mail news service, please send an email with your name, email address and news affiliation to hjones49@jhmi.edu.

After-Hours Calls
Reporters calling before or after regular business hours, should call 410-955-6070 and ask the operator to page the Media Relations representative on-call. 

Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations & Public Affairs
901 S. Bond Street, Suite 550
Baltimore, MD 21231
410-955-4288 or 410-614-6652

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