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The Johns Hopkins NIMH Center for Novel Therapeutics of HIV-associated Cognitive Disorders

The Johns Hopkins NIMH Center comprises an interdisciplinary research team who has pooled their talents to study the nature of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Their aim is to translate discoveries of the pathophysiological mechanisms into novel therapeutics for HAND.

Education

Primary neurological complications of HIV-1/AIDS include:

  • AIDS Dementia Complex: AIDS + memory loss, poor concentration, balance issues, clumsiness, mood changes, loss of energy, diminished ability to work or care for one's self
  • Myelopathy: Literally means "disease of the spinal cord"; HIV-associated myelopathy can present as subacute or chronic leg weakness, spasticity, and hyperreflexia
  • Myopathy: Progressive weakness of limb muscles, neck flexors
  • Neuropathy: Nerve disease or dysfunction; numbness, tremor, tingling, pins-and-needles, tiredness, walking/balance issues
Neurological Complications of HIV-1/AIDS. Primary Neurologic Complications, Opportunistic Infections, Malignancies
Image: Cell Research, 2015

Publications

Featured Publications

Cortical Neurons are a Prominent Source of the Proinflammatory Cytokine Osteopontin in HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders
Silva K, Hope-Lucas C, White T, Hairston TK, Rameau T, Brown A.
Published: January 2015

Read the Abstract: Cortical Neurons are a Prominent Source of the Proinflammatory Cytokine Osteopontin in HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders

Controversies in HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders
Nightingale S, Winston A, Letendre S, Michael BD, McArthur JC, Khoo S, Solomon T
Published: November 2014

Summary: Cross-sectional studies show that around half of individuals infected with HIV-1 have some degree of cognitive impairment despite the use of antiretroviral drugs. However, prevalence estimates vary depending on the population and methods used to assess cognitive impairment. Whether asymptomatic patients would benefit from routine screening for cognitive diffculties is unclear and the appropriate screening method and subsequent management is the subject of debate. In some patients, HIV-1 RNA can be found at higher concentrations in CSF than in blood, which potentially results from the poor distribution of antiretroviral drugs into the CNS. However, the clinical relevance of so-called CSF viral escape is not well understood. The extent to which antiretroviral drug distribution and toxicity in the CNS affect clinical decision making is also debated.

Read Full Text Article: Controversies in HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders


Podcast

Featured Podcast
Broadcasted: October 2014

Clinical and ethical judgment: A profound dilemma

Highlight: The second part of this podcast includes an interview by NIMH Center Director, Justin McArthur, MBBS, MPH, FAAN, discussing salient and clinically relevant features of HIV and its neurologic complications.

Listen to the podcast: Clinical and ethical judgment: A profound dilemma


Upcoming JHU NIMH Center & Collaborator Events

  • NeuroHIV Symposium: Friday, June 19, 2015 in the Weinberg Auditorium (more details forthcoming)
  • Johns Hopkins Faculty and Guest Lecturers present their work at these regularly scheduled conferences:
  • Collaborator Events:
    • Johns Hopkins University Center for AIDS Research (JHU CFAR): Annual Meeting, June 12, 2015
    • Centers for AIDS Research – NIH (CFAR)
    • AIDS.gov

Teamwork

group photo of NIMH faculty
JHU NIMH Center Directors, investigators, and staff

Support

The Johns Hopkins Center for Novel Therapeutics of HIV-associated Cognitive Disorders is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, NIMH Grant P30MH075673

Learn more about the NIMH: National Institute of Mental Health / Research on HIV and AIDS

 

The Johns Hopkins NIMH Center newsletter

Clinical Perspectives

HANSA 2011 Presentations

View a presentation by Dr Justin McArthur entitled "NeuroAIDS Research Needs in the Era of HAART."
Learn more.

Out-of-State and International Patients - Find Out More

 
 
 
 
 

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