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Pseudotumor Cerebri

Pseudotumor cerebri (“false brain tumor”) is a condition characterized by increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the brain. It is also sometimes known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) or benign intracranial hypertension (BIH). 

What You Need to Know

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  • Increased pressure inside the skull causes symptoms that are similar to those seen with a brain tumor, including headache and vision problems.
  • A correct diagnosis is important because pseudotumor cerebri may lead to progressive (and possibly permanent) vision loss.
  • Pseudotumor cerebri is more likely to affect women of childbearing age. Other conditions associated with pseudotumor cerebri are obesity, (especially with recent weight gain), use of certain medications, inborn narrowing of the vein that drains blood from the brain and sleep apnea.

Patient Resources

To Request an Appointment: Call 410-550-1470


Why Choose Johns Hopkins for Treatment of Pseudotumor Cerebri?


Our Physicians

We have a multidisciplinary team of neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuro-ophthalmologists and interventional neuroradiologists that can tailor treatment to your specific condition for the best possible longterm outcomes.

Meet Our Physicians:

Our Patient Care

Pseudotumor Cerebri: Ashley's Story

After visiting more than 30 physicians, Ashley was diagnosed with the rare condition known as pseudotumor cerebri. She turned to The Johns Hopkins Hospital, where experts worked as a team to implant a stent, a new approach to treating this condition.

To Request an Appointment: Call 410-550-1470

 
 
 
 
 
 

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