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Mixed Gliomas

What is a mixed glioma?

A mixed glioma is a malignant glioma made up of more than one type of glial cell. This type of glioma may also be called an oligo-astrocytoma. Mixed gliomas are often found in the cerebrum, but may metastasize to other parts of the brain.

Only about 1% of primary brain tumors are mixed gliomas. They are most common in adult men.

Symptoms of a mixed glioma:

Gliomas cause symptoms by pressing on the brain or spinal cord. Some gliomas may not present any symptoms at all. The most common symptoms are:

  • headache
  • seizures
  • mood disturbances
  • changes in vision
  • nausea or vomiting

The first symptoms likely to present for a mixed glioma may be caused by pressure on the brain, which may be due to a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak.

Treatment for a mixed glioma:

Treatment for an mixed glioma may include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or observation. Learn more about treatment for mixed gliomas.


Learn about types of gliomas: astrocytoma, brain stem glioma, ependymomaoligodendroglioma, optic nerve glioma.


To make an appointment or request a consultation, contact the Johns Hopkins Glioma Center at 410-955-6406.

 
 

Our Comprehensive Brain Tumor Center is a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Brain Tumor Center is a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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