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Living In Baltimore

Baltimore, Maryland is one of America's oldest and most culturally rich and diverse communities. The city and its surrounding areas offer a blend of historic charm, ethnic heritage and urban vitality. Baltimore is home to such historic sites as Fort McHenry, whose defense against the British in the War of 1812 inspired Francis Scott Key to write the words to America's national anthem.

Baltimore has also had more than its share of famous citizens, including Edgar Allen Poe and Babe Ruth. From the dynamic Inner Harbor to the rolling estates on the edges of the city, Baltimore is a community for people of all backgrounds and interests.

The Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center is located in a safe residential neighborhood fewer than five miles from the Inner Harbor on the fringe of the beautiful Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest tidewater bay. The Inner Harbor features a variety of shops, food stands and restaurants at Harborplace. The National Aquarium, the Maryland Science Center and Fort McHenry are other popular landmarks. Summer festivals highlight the many different nationalities and cultures in the area.

Baltimore's entertainment and cultural attractions include the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, which performs in the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the Lyric Opera House, the Hippodrome Theater, the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Walters Art Gallery. The Morris Mechanic Theater and Center Stage theater present traditional and contemporary plays and musicals. The Peabody Conservatory of Music, affiliated with The Johns Hopkins University, offers concerts throughout the year. Concerts at the Pier Six Pavilion, the Baltimore Arena and the nearby Merriweather Post Pavilion run the gamut from swing to jazz, country music and rock. For those who like dining out, Baltimore - famed for its seafood - offers many fine restaurants.

The Chesapeake Bay provides diverse opportunities for boating, fishing and water sport enthusiasts, and the hills and mountains of Western Maryland and West Virginia welcome hikers, campers and skiers. The Atlantic coast beaches of Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey are easy day trips from Baltimore. Historic Annapolis, the state capital and home of the United States Naval Academy, is only 45 miles away. A town for architecture buffs, sailors and seafood lovers, it offers finely preserved 18th-century mansions and historic landmarks along with harbor cruises, sailing schools and antique shops. Washington, D.C., with its myriad historical and cultural attractions, is about an hour drive. In addition to the Smithsonian Institutions, the National Gallery of Art, and the Hirshhorn and Phillips collections, Washington and Georgetown offer a variety of restaurants, specialty shops and bookstores.

Sports fans enjoy Orioles baseball at Camden Yards, Ravens football, indoor soccer, the Hunt Cup, and the yearly Governor's Cup on the Chesapeake Bay. The Pimlico Race Course hosts the Preakness, the second jewel in the Triple Crown. Johns Hopkins University lacrosse and University of Maryland football and basketball enliven the local sports scene. In addition to the range of recreational activities in the Baltimore area, Hopkins Bayview employees can take advantage of a well-equipped, modern fitness center located on the campus. There are also many outstanding walking, jogging and bicycle paths throughout the area.

Where to Live

Johns Hopkins Bayview has many beautiful and affordable neighborhoods within easy commuting distance, and Bayview’s housestaff live throughout the city and surrounding suburbs. Within the city, many older neighborhoods—some dating back to 1799—have been beautifully restored and offer a diverse mix of housing to rent or to buy. For those who prefer a more suburban environment, many residential communities are within 20 minutes of the Medical Center.

Fells Point and Canton, both about ten minutes away, are among the few remaining urban waterfront residential communities on the East Coast, and these two adjoining neighborhoods have many restaurants and bars for dining and live music. A few blocks inland/north are quaint neighborhoods with easy access to Bayview and to downtown Baltimore.

Mount Vernon, an elegant and historic neighborhood of restaurants, shops, and galleries, is in the cultural heart of Baltimore. Once the home of such notable figures as Emily Post and George Peabody, Mount Vernon today offers a variety of historic townhouses, walkup apartments, and modern apartment complexes and high-rises. Nearby are the Peabody Conservatory, Center Stage Theater, and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

South of the Inner Harbor is Federal Hill, a neighborhood that has undergone extensive renewal in recent years and now offers a mix of rowhomes and apartments in a charming, old-city neighborhood.

Although a longer commute to Bayview, the neighborhoods surrounding the Johns Hopkins University undergraduate campus present an eclectic mix of students, professionals, and families. Housing ranges from the brownstones and highrises of Charles Village to the garden communities of Roland Park and Homeland.

Suburbs to the northeast include the popular-and-growing White Marsh and Perry Hall, which have easy access to extensive shopping. New homes and condominiums are readily available.

More to the north of the city are the suburbs of Mount Washington, Towson, and Pikesville.

Finally, to the south are the suburbs of Columbia and Laurel (along with many other towns between Baltimore and Washington). Like White Marsh, Columbia is a rapidly growing community with shopping, schools, and an active housing boom. It is a popular place to live for our house staff whose partners work in Washington, DC or in Bethesda.

For more information on each neighborhood, visit www.livebaltimore.com.

 
 
 
 

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