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General Internal Medicine Track

The General Internal Medicine Residency Program (GIMRP) at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center provides a unique track for those interested in career pathways in primary care medicine, public health and health policy, medical education, geriatrics, hospitalist practice, or any medical subspecialties where a strong grounding in outpatient primary care medicine is advantageous. The GIMRP at Johns Hopkins Bayview, established in 1979, has one of the longest track records of any institution in training primary care general internists, and has graduated numerous individuals into the related fields mentioned above. The faculty of the Division of General Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins Bayview includes some of the nation's leading experts in primary care medicine, medical education, faculty development, and mentoring. The opportunity to work closely with these faculty - - as teachers, advisors, and mentors - - is one of the distinguishing features of the program.

Both the Categorical and GIM programs provide equal and superb inpatient training as well as a variety of other rotations. In terms of camaraderie, and in the eyes of all faculty, GIM and Categorical residents are indistinguishable - - all are part of the Johns Hopkins Bayview family. The major difference between the two tracks is that GIM residents enjoy a more extensive and varied outpatient continuity experience and primary care curriculum, whereas Categorical residents focus on subspecialty clinical or research experiences. In addition to the three-year, hospital-based continuity clinic that all residents participate in, GIM residents have two other continuity experiences:

  • Community-Based Practice (CBP) Resident Firms -- a two-year continuity, clinic at a community-based site where residents are precepted by Johns Hopkins teaching faculty and learn the art and science of ambulatory primary care medicine.
  • Elder House Call Program -- a two-year, continuity clinic where residents follow a panel of 6 to 8 frail, homebound elderly patients through home visits every third month, under the preceptorship of faculty from the Division of Geriatrics.

The sections below further details some of the important similarities and differences between the Categorical and GIM tracks.

Click here for a PDF Version for the GIM Program Description.

 
 
 
 

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