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Viral Hepatitis

There is a Cure

Infectious Disease Center for Viral Hepatitis

The Center has a longstanding history of excellence and leadership in direct patient care and research in the management of viral hepatitis infection. We evaluate and manage patients with confirmed or suspected acute or chronic infections due to hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis D/delta virus (HDV), including those with HIV/AIDS.

We offer FDA approved treatments and access to cutting edge therapies in clinical trials. Our unique outpatient program offers extensive, specialized services in the hands of expert viral hepatitis clinicians, researchers, nurses and case managers.  Our clinical provider team is comprised of 10 infectious disease-trained physicians and 4 nurse practitioners with expertise in the delivery of viral hepatitis care and treatment.

The Johns Hopkins Viral Hepatitis Center offers a comprehensive spectrum of services to manage and treat hepatitis B and C infections, including:

  • Specialty services for the treatment of persons with hepatitis B and C including those coinfected with HIV
  • Comprehensive clinical services targeting international patients seeking access to novel therapies
  • Noninvasive liver staging methods, such as liver elastography
  • Multidisciplinary team of viral hepatitis specialists, hepatologists, nurses and case managers with expertise in the continuum of viral hepatitis care from diagnosis to cure
  • Individualized case management and specialty pharmacy services

Our Providers

hepatitistestingday

Hepatitis C Free Baltimore: 1,000 Cured and Counting was held on May 19, 2016 at the William H. Welch Library. The evening featured keynote speaker John Ward, MD (Centers for Disease Control), Lucy Wilson, MD, Sc.M, (Department of Health and Mental Hygeine), Joneigh Khaldun, MD (Baltimore City Health Department), Redonda Miller, MD (Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System), and Landon King, MD (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine). Speakers highlighted the prevalence of Hepatitis C here in Baltimore, and Johns Hopkins’ ongoing commitment to curing even more patients moving forward. A roundtable discussion followed, with recently cured Hepatitis C patients weighing in on their experiences living with the disease and being treated here at Johns Hopkins. Thank you to our patient panelists, Willis Telp, Monte Ephraim, Annie Calderone, and Marion Winik, and to everyone who attended this event!

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General Information and Clinic Appointments

For information and appointments at all locations, please contact one of the following:

Phone: 443-997-1900
Fax: 443-287-0141
Email: viralhep_appt@jhmi.edu

Clinical Trials

Learn more about Clinical trials
Phone: 443-997-1900
Email: viralhep_trials@jhmi.edu


Getting Here

We offer outpatient services at two convenient locations:

Baltimore City

The Johns Hopkins Medical Campus is home to two outpatient clinic settings for viral hepatitis specialty services. The campus is easily accessible from major North-South (I-95, I-83) corridors and East-West roads and highways (Rte. 40, 70 & 695). Johns Hopkins is also a short drive from Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI).

  • Specialty Clinic at Blalock is located at the Johns Hopkins Hospital on the East Baltimore campus in the Blalock building. The East Baltimore campus offers access to state-of-the-art radiology, endoscopy and comprehensive liver transplant services to ensure every aspect of viral hepatitis care is readily available to our patients and their families. The clinic is located in the Johns Hopkins Hospital at 600 N. Wolfe St. Blalock 319 in Baltimore, MD 21287.
  • Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center is located across the street from Johns Hopkins Hospital in downtown Baltimore City. The clinic is located at 601 N. Caroline St. in Baltimore, MD 21287.

Lutherville

We also see patients at a Johns Hopkins' suburban outpatient center, Johns Hopkins at Green Spring Station, providing an alternative to the downtown location. Located on the Baltimore beltway 20 minutes north of the downtown medical campus, Johns Hopkins at Green Spring Station is easily accessible from major roads and highways.


 

Our Providers

viralhepgroup

 

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Mark Sulkowski, MD
Dr. Mark S. Sulkowski is a professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His areas of clinical expertise include hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). Dr. Sulkowski serves as the medical director of the Viral Hepatitis Center in the divisions of Infectious Diseases and Gastroenterology/Hepatology.

Dr. Sulkowski received his M.D. from the Temple University School of Medicine in 1992. He completed his residency at the Duke University School of Medicine and performed a fellowship in infectious diseases in 1998 at Johns Hopkins.

He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, the European Association for the Study of the Liver and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He is also an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI). 

Dr. Sulkowski is widely published, with works in Annals Internal MedicineNatureNew England Journal of MedicineJournal of the American Medical AssociationJournal of Infectious Diseases and Hepatology. As an invited lecturer, he has presented discussions of the management of viral hepatitis at numerous major national and international medical meetings.

 


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Ashwin Balagopal, MD

Dr. Ashwin Balagopal is an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His area of clinical expertise is infectious diseases. 

After receiving his medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Dr. Balagopal completed his residency in internal medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospital. He performed his fellowship in infectious diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Dr. Balagopal's research interests include microbial translocation and Kupffer cells in HIV-HCV coinfection and in situ liver studies of HIV-HCV pathogenesis.


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Andrea Cox, MD
Dr. Andrea L. Cox is a professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She holds joint appointments in oncology and, at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in molecular microbiology and immunology. She is an internationally recognized leader in studies of the host immune response to chronic viral infections, including HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C (HCV). Dr. Cox serves as the director of the Medical Scientist Training Program.

Dr. Cox earned her Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Virginia, where she worked on the characterization of peptide T cell antigens. She then earned her M.D. and completed internal medicine residency and infectious disease fellowship training at Johns Hopkins. 

She leads the largest prospective cohort study of acute HCV infection designed to enable detailed molecular analysis of HCV transmission, host immune responses and virus sequence evolution. She is the principal investigator on the first prophylactic HCV vaccine trial in individuals at risk of HCV infection. In addition to her research on chronic viral infections, Dr. Cox is actively involved in clinical care of patients with HCV, HIV and hepatitis B infection.

A teacher, advisor and mentor of physician-scientists, Dr. Cox is a faculty member in the cellular and molecular medicine and the immunology graduate programs at the School of Medicine. Dr. Cox also serves as the faculty advisor for the Association of Women Student MD-PhDs.


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Michael Chattergoon, MD 
Dr. Chattergoon received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine through the Medical Scientist Training Program and completed medical residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He completed fellowship training in Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine before transitioning to a faculty position. His primary clinical interest is management and treatment of viral hepatitis and HIV. His research interests include the study of innate immune system responses against chronic viral infections including hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B and HIV.


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Oluwaseun Falade-Nwulia, MD, MPH

Dr. Oluwaseun O. Falade-Nwulia is an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her areas of clinical expertise include infectious disease. 

Dr. Falade-Nwulia earned her M.B.B.S. from the University of Ibadan Medical School College of Medicine. She completed her residency at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She performed fellowships in infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins and a fellowship in critical care medicine at the National Institutes of Health.

 


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Risha Irvin, MD, MPH

Dr. Risha R. Irvin is an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her area of clinical expertise is infectious disease. Dr. Irvin earned her M.D. at Harvard Medical School. She completed her residency at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center. Dr. Irvin serves as the program director of Generation Tomorrow at the Center for AIDS Research at Johns Hopkins.

 


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Chloe Thio, MD
Dr. Chloe Thio is a professor of medicine and an associate professor of molecular microbiology and immunology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her areas of clinical expertise include hepatitis, HIV/AIDS and infectious disease. 

Dr. Thio received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania. She earned her M.D. from the Yale University School of Medicine. She completed her residency at Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and performed a fellowship in infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins. 

Her research interests include hepatitis and HIV/AIDS. Her recent research revealed that certain HIV drugs provide added benefit of protecting against hepatitis B. 

Dr. Thio serves on the Research Compensation Subcommittee for the Department of Medicine. She is a member of the American College of Physicians, the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, HIVMA and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.


 
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Sarah Keller, MD

Dr. Sara Keller graduated from the Duke University School of Medicine in 2007. She completed her Master of Public Health in epidemiology in 2006 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She then completed a residency in Internal Medicine in the Osler Medical Residency Training Program at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2010. She then completed a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania in 2012, and a fellowship in the University of Pennsylvania Centers for Healthcare Improvement and Patient Safety in 2013. She also completed a Master of Science in Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania in 2013.

She is currently a Clinical Associate in Infectious Disease where she primarily sees patients at Johns Hopkins Greenspring Station, and also attends on the inpatient infectious disease consult service at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Her clinical interests are in the long-term management of patients with HIV, hepatitis C, or hepatitis B, the management of outpatients on parenteral antimicrobial therapy, chronic bacterial infections, and general infectious disease


 

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Michael Melia, MD
Dr. Michael T. Melia is an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His areas of clinical expertise include general infectious diseases, HIV and Lyme disease. He serves as the associate director of the Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program.

After receiving his medical degree from the Georgetown University School of Medicine, Dr. Melia completed his internal medicine residency, infectious diseases fellowship, and chief medical residency at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2008.

Dr. Melia's research interests include Nocardia infections, Lyme disease, hepatitis C, and medical education. He is developing a curriculum to improve the quality of teaching delivered by residents and fellows to medical students and interns.

In 2015, Dr. Melia was recognized with the Outstanding Achievement in Teaching Award from the Institute for Excellence in Education at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a member of the American College of Physicians, the Massachusetts Medical Society and the Infectious Diseases Society of America.


 
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David Thomas, MD
Dr. David Lee Thomas is a professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases and cares for patients with chronic viral hepatitis. 

Dr. Thomas serves as the director of the Division of Infectious Diseases and is the Stanhope Bayne-Jones Professor of Medicine. He is also co-director of the Center for AIDS Research Clinical Core.

He earned his undergraduate degree in chemistry, in 1982, and his medical degree, in 1986, from West Virginia University. He then completed his medical training and residency at Wake Forest University in North Carolina, before coming to Johns Hopkins as a research fellow in infectious diseases. He went on to earn his Master of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He joined the faculty at both schools, the School of Medicine in 1993 and Public Health in 1994. 

From 2005 to 2006, he served as director of research at the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda. The institute provides free medical and social services for HIV-1-infected Ugandans and training for physicians and nurses from across sub-Saharan Africa.

For his commitment to translating medical research into advances in the care of people living with both hepatitis C and HIV, the American Society of Clinical Investigation named Dr. Thomas to its honor list of physician-scientists in 2001.


 
 
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Justin Bailey, MD
Dr. Bailey received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine through the Medical Scientist Training Program and completed medical residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He subseqently completed fellowship training in Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine before transitioning to a faculty position. His primary clinical interest is management and treatment of viral hepatitis, including hepatitis c virus. His research interests include the study of immune responses against hepatitis c virus, particularly neutralizing antibody responses, with the goal of guiding vaccine development against the virus.


 
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Stuart Ray, MD
Stuart C. Ray, MD, FACP, FIDSA serves as Vice Chair of Medicine for Data Integrity and Analytics and is a Professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases within the Department of Medicine, with secondary appointments in Viral Oncology and Health Sciences Informatics. He is Scientific Director of the JHU Laboratory for Integrated NanoDiagnostics, directs the virology laboratory and is a clinical investigator in the Center for Viral Hepatitis Research in the Division of Infectious Diseases. He is a faculty member of the Graduate Immunology program, the Graduate Pharmacology program, and of the Janeway Firm of the Osler Medical Service.

Dr. Ray received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1990. After an internship and residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital, he continued there as an Assistant Chief of Service and fellow in Infectious Diseases. During his fellowship, he studied the immunology and sequence variation of HIV in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Bollinger. During that time, he developed an interest in HIV sequence variation during antiretroviral therapy in a productive collaboration with Dr. Robert Siliciano that continues to the present.

In 1997 Dr. Ray joined the Johns Hopkins faculty, and under the mentorship of Dr. David Thomas shifted his primary research focus to hepatitis C virus (HCV).  His laboratory work has focused on the sequence variation of HCV during acute and chronic infection, developing and applying computational and molecular biology tools to underlying mechanisms including stochastic variation, immune selection, and viral fitness. He continues to care for patients with HIV, HCV, and other infectious diseases.