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REPORTING ERRORS

EVERYONE NEEDS TO BE INVOLVED IN MONITORING FOR SAFETY IN MEDICINE, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

In the increasingly technical world of medicine, careful monitoring and reporting of treatment errors helps everyone, but a recent study by Kendra Harris, a radiation oncologist at Johns Hopkins, and colleagues, found that physicians may be reluctant to use such reporting systems.

HARRIS: Physicians don't participate as much as other members of the team, and it looks like the reasons for that non-participation may be related to specific barriers that they feel, so being concerned about being embarrassed, getting in trouble, seem to be important. When we started the project we thought that maybe physicians don't have any time, or they don't value reporting, or they feel that it's not important and shouldn't be prioritized and certainly none of those things were true at all. It was in fact more of an issue of addressing some of the cultural norms that get in the way. :33

Harris says now that the problem has been pinpointed, solutions are on the way. At Johns Hopkins, I'm Elizabeth Tracey.

 



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