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THE MAJORITY OF MEN REALLY DON'T NEED PSA SCREENING, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

The United States Preventive Services Task Force has recommended that most men give prostate specific antigen or PSA screening a miss, citing a lot of overtreatment issues that have cropped up since PSA testing became routine. But Ballantine Carter, a prostate cancer expert at Johns Hopkins, has other advice.

CARTER: Get a baseline PSA test. If it's low, below the median for that age group, that person is at virtually no risk of developing an aggressive cancer over ten to twenty years. So they don't need to be screened very frequently. But for those people who are in their forties who have PSA levels that are high for that age, those people are at very high risk for being diagnosed with an aggressive cancer during their lifetime, and they need to be looked at more frequently. The PSA is a strong predictor for later development of aggressive disease. :30

Carter cites data showing that deaths from prostate cancer have declined substantially, and credits PSA screening for much of that. At Johns Hopkins, I'm Elizabeth Tracey.

 



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