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PILL PACEMAKER

CAN ORAL MEDICINES REGULATE THE HEART'S PUMPING ACTION? ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Cardiac resynchronization therapy, known for short as CRT, is more familiar to most as a pacemaker, used when someone has a certain type of heart failure. Now David Kass and colleagues at Johns Hopkins have discovered why the device is effective- it actually induces changes in the heart cells that make them more responsive to adrenaline.

KASS: We have now what I'm calling extracting the lessons of CRT, a kind of more molecular lesson, pointing the path at which one might be able to test whether those molecular changes could be applied to other kinds of heart failure, where the heart is in failure but is contracting all at the same time. But that same molecular modification might prove useful, and we've found some already that are quite intriguing. This sort of becomes my pacemaker in a bottle. :29

Kass says knowing this molecular basis will enable researchers to develop medicines or therapies that mimic the device. At Johns Hopkins, I'm Elizabeth Tracey.

 



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