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WOMEN AND BLADDER CANCER

THERE'S AN ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SMOKING AND BLADDER CANCER IN WOMEN, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

About half of all bladder cancers in men are attributable to cigarette smoking, but now women are closing the gap. That's according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, explains.

NELSON: What has happened in bladder cancer in women is that more of the bladder cancer in women appears to be more directly attributable to cigarette smoking. Now why cigarette smoke, that you breath in, affects cancers in the bladder, is almost certainly related to things that are in the cigarette smoke that appear in the bladder and another thing that's happened over the years is that the cigarettes themselves have been changed in terms of the way they are produced and distributed, leading to different exposures to different compounds. :30

Nelson says the clear message to all is to stop smoking immediately, or don't begin at all. The good news is the risk of bladder cancer declines when people quit smoking. At Johns Hopkins, I'm Elizabeth Tracey.

 



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