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ANCHOR LEAD: ONE TYPE OF URINARY INCONTINENCE MAY BE CONTROLLED BY DIET, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Urinary incontinence is a huge public health problem, affecting many thousands of people, especially women. Now a new study offers women hope in helping to control one type of urinary incontinence. Arthur Burnett, a urologist at Johns Hopkins, explains the findings.

BURNETT: Women who have a high caffeine intake, which is the equivalent of four cups of coffee a day or ten cans of caffeinated tea or soda drinks are at higher risk of developing urge urinary incontinence, not stress incontinence. Urge referring to a sudden sense of urgency and an inability to control the urge to urinate as opposed to stress which has to do with exertional activity, and suggests that by decreasing this amount of caffeine intake we may be able to reduce one in four incident urge incontinence out there. :31

Burnett says reducing caffeine intake is worth trying for women who have urge incontinence. At Johns Hopkins, I'm Elizabeth Tracey.

 



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