Johns Hopkins logo

Health Newsfeed

OVARIAN CANCER SCREENING

USING CURRENT TECHNIQUES TO SCREEN FOR OVARIAN CANCER YIELDS DISAPPOINTING RESULTS, ELIZABETH TRACEY REPORTS

Ovarian cancer remains a killer, with most tumors so widespread at the time of diagnosis that the majority of women die within a few years. Yet a recent study using both a blood marker called CA125 along with ultrasound didn’t help improve survival, a very disappointing result, says William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins.

NELSON: If you look in detail at the results generated one thing that happens with all the other screening approaches that we use for cancer is that when the cancers are diagnosed or detected they are smaller and less extensively spread throughout the body. In this study that did not happen at all, which means the screening tools being used were not detecting the ovarian cancer at an earlier stage. It suggests that the screening tools used in this way is not a very good idea.       :32

Nelson says the definitive experiment where cell phone users are compared to non-users over time will likely never be done. At Johns Hopkins, I’m Elizabeth Tracey.

Search Health NewsFeed

-----------------------------------------
Health NewsFeed Home | Hopkins Medicine Home